Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes

Among the US population overall, crude estimates for 2018 were:

  • 26.9 million people of all ages—or 8.2% of the US population—had diagnosed diabetes.
  • 210,000 children and adolescents younger than age 20 years—or 25 per 10,000 US youths—had diagnosed diabetes. This includes 187,000 with type 1 diabetes.
  • 1.4 million adults aged 20 years or older—or 5.2% of all US adults with diagnosed diabetes—reported both having type 1 diabetes and using insulin.
  • 2.9 million adults aged 20 years or older—or 10.9% of all US adults with diagnosed diabetes—started using insulin within a year of their diagnosis.

Among US adults aged 18 years or older, age-adjusted data for 2017–2018 indicated the following:

  • Prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was highest among American Indians/Alaska Natives (14.7%), people of Hispanic origin (12.5%), and non-Hispanic blacks (11.7%), followed by non-Hispanic Asians (9.2%) and non-Hispanic whites (7.5%) (Appendix Table 3).
  • American Indians/Alaska Natives had the highest prevalence of diagnosed diabetes for women (14.8%) (Figure 2; Appendix Table 3).
  • American Indian/Alaska Native men had a significantly higher prevalence of diagnosed diabetes (14.5%) than non-Hispanic black (11.4%), non-Hispanic Asian (10.0%), and non-Hispanic white (8.6%) men (Figure 2; Appendix Table 3).
  • Among adults of Hispanic origin, Mexicans (14.4%) and Puerto Ricans (12.4%) had the highest prevalences, followed by Central/South Americans (8.3%) and Cubans (6.5%) (Appendix Table 3).
  • Among non-Hispanic Asians, Asian Indians (12.6%) and Filipinos (10.4%) had the highest prevalences, followed by Chinese (5.6%). Other Asian groups had a prevalence of 9.9% (Appendix Table 3).
  • Among adults, prevalence varied significantly by education level, which is an indicator of socioeconomic status. Specifically, 13.3% of adults with less than a high school education had diagnosed diabetes versus 9.7% of those with a high school education and 7.5% of those with more than a high school education (Appendix Table 3).

Figure 2. Age-adjusted estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes by race/ethnicity group and sex for adults aged 18 years or older, United States, 2017–2018

Bar chart comparing men and women of different races as described in the above text.

Note: Error bars represent upper and lower bounds of the 95% confidence interval.

Data sources: 2017–2018 National Health Interview Survey; 2017 Indian Health Service National Data Warehouse (for American Indian/Alaska Native group only).

County-Level Prevalence Among Adults

Among US adults aged 20 years or older, age-adjusted, county-level data indicated:

  • In 2016, estimates of diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied across US counties, ranging from 1.5% to 33.0% (Figure 3).
  • Median county-level prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased from 7.8% in 2004 to 13.1%in 2016.

Figure 3. Age-adjusted, county-level prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 20 years or older, United States, 2004, 2008, and 2016

US map in year 2004 had 1.5-6.9 percent of adults aged 20 years and older diagnosed with diabetes. US map in year 2008 had 8.5-9.8 percent of adults aged 20 years and older diagnosed with diabetes. US map in year 2016 had 12.2-33 percent of adults aged 20 years and older diagnosed with diabetes.

Note: Data were unavailable for some US territories.

Data sources: US Diabetes Surveillance System; Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Page last reviewed: June 25, 2020