Cancers Associated with Human Papillomavirus, United States—2011–2015

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Based on data from 2011 to 2015, about 42,700 new cases of HPV-associated cancers occurred in the United States each year.

U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Briefs, No. 4
August 2018

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Note

The data in this data brief were the most recent data available at the time of publication. More recent data may be available in an updated data brief or in the U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations tool, which is updated annually.

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recognized cause of cancer. Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously, persistent infections can progress to precancer or cancer.
  • Cancer registries do not routinely collect information about HPV status, so in this report, HPV-associated cancers are defined as those that occur in parts of the body where HPV is often found. These body parts include the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils).
  • Based on data from 2011 to 2015, about 42,700 new cases of HPV-associated cancers occurred in the United States each year, including about 24,400 among women and about 18,300 among men.
  • The incidence rate of HPV-associated cancers varied by cancer type, sex, and race/ethnic group. Cervical cancer is the most common HPV-associated cancer among women, and oropharyngeal cancers are the most common among men.
Suggested Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cancers Associated with Human Papillomavirus, United States—2011–2015. USCS data brief, no 4. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2018.

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Page last reviewed: October 31, 2018