Videos

At a glance

Young women and men who have been affected by breast cancer share their stories in these videos.

Beyond the Diagnosis

Beyond the Diagnosis: Being a Previvor

Breast cancer previvors are those who have a known higher risk for the disease due to harmful genetic changes or family history but have not been diagnosed with breast cancer. For previvors, living with risk can be coupled with anxiety, feelings of isolation, guilt, and discomfort with where they fit into the breast cancer community. In this episode, young previvors share their experiences navigating risk management options, talking about their risk, and finding their voices.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Family Planning

For young women, breast cancer treatment may affect your plans for having children and building a family. Family planning decisions affect breast cancer previvors (women with a known high risk but who have not been diagnosed with the disease). These women discuss how breast cancer and their treatment changed their plans to have children, and the family planning decisions they face.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Relationships

Love and dating can be tricky—even more so when breast cancer is a factor. These six women share how they navigate romantic relationships and body acceptance as young women affected by breast cancer.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Kiki's Story

Kiki's long road to a breast cancer diagnosis taught her the importance of being her own advocate. In this episode, Kiki reflects on how therapy has helped her navigate motherhood, family relationships, and her journey with infertility.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Megan's Story

From the challenges of finding support to the joys of finding love, Megan shares her experience as a stage 4 metastatic breast cancer survivor. She stresses the importance of staying attuned to the signs and symptoms of the disease while cherishing each moment with those who matter most.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Micha's Story

A decade after her breast cancer diagnosis, Micha reflects on how the disease affected her relationships, career, and outlook on life. She now dedicates her time to spreading awareness about the risk of breast cancer among young women.

Beyond the Diagnosis: Taylor's Story

Taylor, a travel nurse, was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 25. Taylor talks about what it's like to face breast cancer as young adult, how being a breast cancer survivor made her a better nurse, and the challenges of dating after cancer.

Carletta

Carletta's Breast Cancer Story: A Decade After Diagnosis

Ten years after her breast cancer diagnosis, Carletta looks back on how her definition of bravery has changed. She discusses how she managed the highs and lows of being a cancer survivor and learning how to ask for help.

Carletta: Managing Survivor Guilt

A decade after her breast cancer battle, Carletta unpacks the complex feelings of guilt and gratitude that many survivors struggle with. Carletta describes how she's found comfort in embracing empathy for others while also being grateful for her own journey.

Carletta: Supporting Survivors

The breast cancer journey is never easy, but having a support system can make a big difference. Carletta, a 10-year breast cancer survivor, says meeting survivors wherever they're at emotionally is key to being a supportive friend or partner.

Carletta: Why Words Matter

Not all cancer survivors feel like they are "superheroes" or "brave." In this video, Carletta, a breast cancer survivor herself, explains the importance of using words that uplift rather than add pressure.

Charity

There Isn't Just One Face to Breast Cancer

When Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer at 27, she faced a series of hard decisions. Learn the steps she took to be proactive about her health and her cancer risk, and what she wants young women to know about their health.

No Matter Your Age, Know Your Breast Cancer Risk

At age 27, Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer. Find out how she took a proactive approach to her health and what she wants other young women to know about their breast cancer risk.

Emily and Caroline

Emily and Caroline: Do What Works Best for You

When Emily and Caroline found out their mom had a BRCA gene mutation, they decided to get tested themselves. From there, they took different paths. Find out how these sisters and their mom support each other, and how one size doesn't always fit all when managing your breast cancer risk.

Emily and Caroline: Two Different Paths

Breast cancer doesn't just affect the person diagnosed. It can affect the entire family. Sisters Emily and Caroline manage their breast cancer risk in individual ways but support each other on their paths.

Jackie

Jackie: Taking Action for My Daughter

Jackie, age 38, has a paternal family history of breast and ovarian cancer and a BRCA gene mutation. She shares how understanding her risk enabled her to take action to reduce her risk for breast and ovarian cancer. She created a roadmap for a bright future for herself and her 4-year-old daughter.

Jackie: Testing for a BRCA Gene Mutation

Jackie saw many relatives on her father's side of the family get diagnosed with and die from breast or ovarian cancer. Because of her family history, her doctor recommended she receive genetic counseling. Jackie explains her experience with genetic counseling and testing.

Jackie's Bring Your Brave Ad

Jackie took steps to learn about her risk for breast and ovarian cancer because of her family history.

Lisa

Lisa: Start the Conversation About Family History of Breast Cancer

Lisa realized that having family members with pre-menopausal breast and ovarian cancer meant she has a higher risk of getting cancer before age 45. She talks about how this affected her as a young mother and why she takes steps to manage her risk. Lisa provides a tip for talking with family members about their history of cancer.

Lisa: Empower Yourself by Learning Your Family's Cancer History

Lisa's family history of breast and ovarian cancer puts her at higher risk for getting cancer in the future. Watch this video to learn how she's used this information to empower herself.

Lisa: My Experience With BRCA Counseling and Testing

Lisa, age 41, talks about how her family history led her to get genetic counseling and testing for BRCA gene mutations. She describes the genetic testing experience and how it helped her understand her family history and manage her breast cancer risk.

Lisa: Be Your Own Health Advocate

Lisa, age 41, talks about her decision to get genetic counseling and testing to find out if she had a BRCA gene mutation. She explains how the experience empowered her to understand her options and be her own best health advocate.

Marleah

Marleah: Inspired by My Mom

When Marleah was 8, she watched her mother, then 38, go through breast cancer treatment. Her mother's experience inspired her to understand and her own risk. She learned she has a BRCA2 gene mutation like her mom and aunt. To manage her risk, Marleah undergoes surveillance.

Marleah: Understanding My Risk to Help Others

Marleah's family history of breast cancer motivated her to pursue a career in which she can advocate for herself and others at high risk. At 27, Marleah explains that understanding her risk has been an emotional journey, but also a good journey.

Marleah's Bring Your Brave Ad

Marleah took steps to understand her risk for breast cancer because of her family history. She encourages young women with a family history of cancer to learn their personal risk.

Sally and Gloria

Supporting Survivors: Sally and Gloria's Story

After Sally learned she had breast cancer at 26, her best friend Gloria was there to support her through everything. They share valuable advice for survivors on how to ask for help and how to help loved ones after a breast cancer diagnosis.

From a genetic counselor

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer (30-second)

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains that if you have a family history of breast cancer, it is important to speak with a genetic counselor or a health professional about your breast cancer risk.

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains how family history of breast cancer may indicate inherited changes in genes that increase your breast cancer risk. She offers steps you can take if you have concerns about your risk.

BRCA Genes and Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, provides an overview of BRCA genes and their relationship to breast and ovarian cancer. She explains how each of us inherits BRCA genes from our parents, the role of those genes, and what happens if we inherit a gene mutation. She also talks about how genetic counseling and testing can give women information to make decisions about their health.

What Is a BRCA Gene Mutation?

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains what the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are and how a mutation in either gene can lead to cancer. She also discusses how genetic counseling and testing can help women make informed decisions about their health.

Ask the Expert

What Would You Tell Your Patients About Drinking Alcohol and Breast Cancer Risk?

CDC's Dr. Lisa Richardson explains the link between drinking alcoholic beverages and breast cancer risk, and what you can do to lower your risk.

Why Does Breastfeeding Lower Your Risk of Breast Cancer?

CDC's Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why breastfeeding your babies can lower your breast cancer risk.

What Should I Know About My Family History of Breast Cancer?

CDC's Dr. Temeika Fairley explains how a family history of breast cancer can raise your risk, and how to start the conversation about family health history.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Breast Cancer?

CDC's Dr. Temeika Fairley explains several signs and symptoms of breast cancer, including some you may not know about.

How Can I Reduce My Risk of Breast Cancer?

You can make healthy choices to help lower your breast cancer risk. CDC's Dr. Temeika Fairley explains.

Why Do Black Women Have a Higher Risk of Breast Cancer at a Young Age?

CDC's Dr. Temeika Fairley explains what she wants young Black women to know about their breast cancer risk.

Talking About Your Family History of Cancer

These videos offer advice for having conversations about your family history of cancer. Women and men affected by hereditary breast and ovarian cancer talk about their conversations with family members, and two health care providers share their views.