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Teen Pregnancy Prevention 2010–2015

Integrating Services, Programs, and Strategies Through Communitywide Initiatives: State- and Community-Based Organizations

Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Campaign of North Carolina

Gaston county's first wellness center logo.

The Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Campaign of North Carolina (APPCNC) has implemented Gaston Youth Connected (GYC). The 5-year GYC project is an intensive collaboration between APPCNC, local partners, and partners who can ensure long-term project sustainability. APPCNC works with multiple clinical and program sites to increase agencies’ capacity to provide evidence-based interventions and connect youth to clinic services. Evidence-based and evidence-informed programs are being implemented in at least 10 community sites. Programs include Making Proud Choices, Teen Outreach Program (TOP), Parents Matter!, and ¡Cuidate!. APPCNC has also worked with the community to develop three teams to provide project input and planning: a Core Partner Team to plan activities, a Community Advisory Panel, and a Youth Advisory Panel. A designated At-Risk Populations Coordinator focuses on reaching Latino/Hispanic teens, African American teens, and pregnant and parenting teens. Partners work together to connect more youth to adequate clinical services. The three primary partner groups and panels inform community stakeholders about the importance of effective prevention efforts, and work to ensure long-term program and project sustainability.

Alabama Department of Public Health

Think about it!, Alabama Department of Public Health logo

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) is the Title X Family Planning agency for the state. ADPH focuses its teen pregnancy prevention activities on Mobile County, Alabama. Mobile County has the highest teen pregnancy rate (65.6 per 1,000 population) of Alabama’s three largest metropolitan statistical areas, and more than 29,000 females aged 10–19 years. The Mobile County Health Department (MCHD) has established partnerships with 11 youth-serving organizations and 4 family planning health care providers at 8 sites to recruit teens into the program. MCHD created a Youth Leadership Team which helped design and launch an innovative and informative Web site, www.thinkteen.org. This teen-friendly Web site empowers youth by providing accurate information and resources to assist them in making responsible, informed decisions to avoid unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The Alabama Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and Region IV Title X Training Center collaborates to train staff and educate stakeholders on the effective development and implementation of evidence-based and evidence-informed teen pregnancy prevention programs. MCDH health educators are implementing evidence-based interventions with teens, engaging community stakeholders, and conducting training of trainers to promote program sustainability. Program evaluation will be done in conjunction with staff from the University of South Alabama. As a result of these efforts, by 2015 ADPH expects a 10% reduction in birth rates among African-American females aged 15–19 in the target community.

City of Hartford, Department of Health and Human Services

City of Hartford Health and Human Services Department

The City of Hartford, Department of Health and Human Services (HHHS) coordinates Hartford’s community wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. The 5-year project serves low-income African-American and Hispanic teens aged 13–19 years in Hartford, and engages a majority of the city's youth-serving organizations, health clinics, the Hartford Department of Health and Human Services, the City of Hartford Youth Services Office (HOYS), the Hartford System of Schools, and other public and private sector leaders and cooperating organizations. This initiative builds on current services being offered to teens in Hartford by using the context of Social Determinants of Health and engaging a variety of community organizations. HHHS works closely with its partners  to implement evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs, connect youth to clinic services, educate stakeholders, and promote program sustainability. More than 10 youth-serving organizations, 4 community health clinics, and private sector supporters will collaborate with HHHS, to meet defined objectives for each project component.

AccessMatters

I matter Philly Preventing Teen Pregnancy, Philadelphia logo

AccessMatters aims to reduce teen birth rates 10% by 2015 in the predominately African American West Philadelphia community. FPC is a private, nonprofit organization responsible for administering public funding for Title X family planning services in southeastern Pennsylvania. The target community has high teen birth rates, poverty, and unemployment rates, and low high school graduation rates. The project goal will be achieved by increasing the number and percentage of youth aged 10–19 years who participate in evidence-based and evidence-informed teen pregnancy prevention programs, and increasing the number and percentage of youth who receive clinical care. FPC provides training and technical assistance to youth-serving agencies and clinics to select, implement, evaluate, and sustain evidence-based programs; provides training and technical assistance to clinics to increase accessibility and teen-friendliness; builds relationships between clinics and youth-serving agencies; links with the network of school-based health resource centers providing evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs; supports the CHOICE Hotline to increase teens’ awareness of clinical services; has established an “Askable Adult Program” to serve as a reproductive health resource for youth serving professionals and other adults in the community; holds community events; and disseminates information to stakeholders.

Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power & Potential

Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power & Potential logo

The Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power & Potential (G-CAPP) works with youth-serving organizations and clinical service providers in Richmond County, Georgia, to implement a communitywide pregnancy prevention intervention designed to reach more than 16,000 African American and Latino youth aged 15–19 years. G-CAPP works to increase the number of youth receiving evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs, and increase the number of sexually active youth referred to appropriate services by conducting interventions informed by needs assessments in partner organizations and the target community. Project activities include working with 10 youth-serving organizations and 5 reproductive health clinics in Richmond County, Georgia, to reduce teen births by 10% by 2015. G-CAPP and its partners established a youth advisory panel, developed and implemented a community advocacy plan targeting stakeholders, and is using new and traditional media to increase awareness and linkages between programs and clinics.

Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy

Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy logo

The Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy (MATP) launched the “Youth First” initiative to reduce teen birth rates in the communities of Springfield and Holyoke by 10% by 2015, with a focus on serving African American and Latino/Hispanic youth at high risk of teen pregnancy. MATP’s primary partner is the YEAH (Youth Empowerment and Adolescent Health) Network, a teen pregnancy prevention coalition. This initiative aims to reach 15,000 youth, parents, youth-service providers, funders, and other stakeholders. This community wide approach includes a core partner group of YEAH, community-based organizations, clinical service providers, city health departments, and school districts. Primary goals are to increase the number of young people receiving sexual and reproductive health services and evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. Activities include providing technical assistance on program planning, implementation, evaluation and sustainability; supporting local partners who are currently implementing evidence-based programming; training and supporting clinics in using best practices in adolescent sexual health; and engaging and mobilizing stakeholders—including youth—as leaders on teen pregnancy prevention.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bureau of Maternal, Infant, and Reproductive Health (NYCDOH) has implemented “Bronx Teens Connection,” a multicomponent, communitywide teen pregnancy prevention initiative in two community districts in the South Bronx. Key partners include the Bronx District Public Health Office, the Department of Education, the Administration for Children’s Services, private clinical service providers, and a number of minority- and youth-serving organizations in the community. Evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention curricula are being implemented in high schools in the target community, as well as for teens in foster care and out-of-school settings. Links to clinical services are being strengthened in school-based and community health centers. This initiative includes an innovative social marketing campaign using new media to educate community youth and stakeholders. NYCDOH provides training and technical assistance to community partners, including training on long-term institutional sustainability.

South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

Not right now put pregnancy on hold. Spartanburg SC.

The South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) has implemented innovative, multicomponent, communitywide initiatives to prevent teen pregnancy in two communities, with a focus on reaching African American and Latino youth aged 15–19 years. SC Campaign works to reduce teen pregnancy among ethnic minority youth in Spartanburg and Horry Counties by increasing access to high quality, evidence-based and evidence-informed youth development and teen pregnancy prevention programs, and increasing linkages between these programs and community-based clinical services. Major activities include developing a Community Advisory Group with representatives from a Youth Advisory Panel and local clinics, educating leadership on evidence-based programming, and developing content for an Online Learning Center aimed at building capacity among local partner organizations.

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) - UT Teen Health (UTTH) provides an innovative community-wide initiative in south San Antonio to focus on decreasing teen births in Latino/Hispanic youth. UTTH provides community wide, medically accurate, evidence-based/informed teen pregnancy prevention programs, and creates and enhances linkages between  youth serving organizations and community-based clinical services. Major activities include implementing culturally appropriate, evidence-based/informed teen pregnancy prevention programs with students in schools, juvenile justice and foster care, and providing training and technical assistance to community-based clinical service providers to build organizational sustainability.

 
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