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PRC Program Seminar Series Summer 2009

Thomas A. Pearson, MD, PhD, MPH, from the National Center for Deaf Health Research and a sign language interpreter

Thomas A. Pearson, MD, PhD, MPH, from the National Center for Deaf Health Research, the University of Rochester Prevention Research Center, spoke on June 10, 2009, to an audience of hearing and deaf people with the assistance of an American Sign Language interpreter.

The 2004-2009 PRC Program funding cycle ended in September 2009. During the summer, several PRCs shared results from their core research projects at a seminar series held at CDC.

Brief summaries of the presentations are given below. For additional information, please contact the PRC Program office at cdcinfo@cdc.gov.

Seminars:
Topic: Working with the Deaf Community to Identify Health Priorities
Presenter: University of Rochester PRC
June 10, 2009

Topic: Community-Based Prevention Marketing: A Framework for Health Program Planning
Presenter: University of South Florida PRC
July 8, 2009

Topic: Promoting Health and Well-Being in Youth
Presenters: University of Minnesota PRC and
University of New Mexico PRC
August 12, 2009

Topic: Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative
Presenter: Harvard University PRC
September 9, 2009


Seminar summaries:

Working with the Deaf Community to Identify Health Priorities
University of Rochester PRC
June 10, 2009

Deaf and hard-of-hearing persons constitute medically underserved minority groups that are underrepresented in health research and public health surveillance.

The University of Rochester’s Prevention Research Center (National Center for Deaf Health Research) and partners adapted the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to create a linguistically accessible, culturally appropriate, video-based survey in American Sign Language (ASL).

Presenters described the community-academic collaboration essential to this research, lessons learned about recruitment of deaf research participants, the development of reproducible survey methods in ASL, and survey findings. The survey findings helped identify some community strengths and at least three areas of health disparity: obesity and overweight, intimate partner violence, and self-reported suicide attempts.

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Community-Based Prevention Marketing: A Framework for Health Program Planning
University of South Florida PRC
July 8, 2009

Community-based prevention marketing (CBPM) combines principles of social marketing with elements of community organization to promote health behavior change at the community level. The presenters described the development and applications of the framework, which the Florida Prevention Research Center evaluated for four projects. One example was discussed in depth: Scorecard—a CBPM project to promote physical activity among youth. The session also covered use of CBPM to tailor and evaluate an intervention.

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Promoting Health and Well-Being in Youth
University of Minnesota PRC and University of New Mexico PRC
August 12, 2009

The presenters will describe two programs developed for youth at risk for violence exposure, substance use, and trauma.

Lead Peace addresses risk and protective factors for violence and substance use among middle school students. Participants practice social skills, develop emotional skills, build relationships with peers and adults, and increase involvement in their school and community by participating in a community service-learning project. Program analyses found an association between students’ sense of hopefulness and social connections, and lower levels of aggressive and violent behavior.

Teen Health Resiliency Intervention for Violence Exposure (THRIVE) addresses exposure to violence and multiple layers of trauma (historical, chronic, and episodic) among American Indian youth. The presenters will discuss adaptation of the school-based Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS). The adapted program, which focused on healing historical trauma and strengthening family relationships, was implemented in To’Hajiilee, New Mexico. Families were positively affected by the program’s focus on problem-solving, social support, and traditional cultural practices.

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Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative
Harvard University PRC
September 9, 2009

The prevalence of overweight among children in the United States has tripled since 1980. Physicians need to be informed about the health consequences of childhood overweight, the criteria for diagnosis, and ways to address the problem with children and their families. The Maine-Harvard Prevention Research Center (MHPRC) established the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative (MYOC) in partnership with the Maine Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Together they developed an approach to addressing overweight in children via physicians’ offices. An expert panel selected 4 main messages for children and parents: eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day, limit screen time (television and computer use) to 2 hours per day, get 1 hour of physical activity every day, and avoid sugar-sweetened beverages. The slogan “5-2-1-0” was adopted to help promote these messages. The intention of the program is to train all physicians in Maine so that addressing children’s weight may become a routine part of clinical practice. MYOC has been recognized by the National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality for outstanding achievements in preventing and treating childhood obesity.

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