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PRC Comparative Effectiveness Research Grantees Present at CDC

Investigators conducting the PRC Comparative Effectiveness Research projects* described innovative methods and preliminary results during seminars at CDC. Attendees included CDC staff and invited guests. The presentation titles, presenters and PRC affiliations, brief summaries, and links to presentation slides are listed below.

Seminars:

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: Academic Curiosity or Practical Tool for Getting More "Bang" for Our Community Health "Buck"?

R. Scott Braithwaite, MD, MSc, FACP
New York University School of Medicine PRC
September 15, 2011

Comparative Effectiveness of a Statewide Program for Primary Prevention of Falls in Older Adults
Steven Albert, PhD
University of Pittsburgh PRC
September 26, 2011

Comparative Effectiveness of Telemedicine to Detect Diabetic Retinopathy
Steven Mansberger, MD, MPH
Oregon Health & Science University PRC
October 6, 2011

Comparing Delivery Methods of a Combined Lifestyle and Medication Adherence Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk (CVD)
Thomas Keyserling, MD, MPH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill PRC
June 25, 2012



Seminar Summaries


Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: Academic Curiosity or Practical Tool for Getting More "Bang" for Our Community Health "Buck"?
Dr. Scott Braithwaite with the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine PRC described mathematical methods and models developed at NYU that have the potential to influence public health decision making. He highlighted NYU’s PRC CER project and other NYU projects that are advancing rigorous, policy-relevant research to optimize quality and value in healthcare. The approach incorporates methods of decision science, comparative effectiveness, and cost effectiveness.

View Dr. Braithwaite’s presentation slides.

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Comparative Effectiveness of a Statewide Program for Primary Prevention of Falls in Older Adults
Dr. Steven Albert with the University of Pittsburgh PRC presented preliminary findings from the PRC CER project comparing the effectiveness of two falls prevention programs in Pennsylvania – one that focuses on education (Healthy Steps for Older Adults) and one that combines education with group exercise (Healthy Steps in Motion). He described a methodology that resulted in 2,100 older adults being enrolled in the research. He compared number of falls and hospitalizations for falls between participants receiving each program and for non-participants. In addition, Dr. Albert presented initial results that described participants’ response to an innovative automated telephone protocol, used to collect follow-up data, that had not been used with older adults.

View Dr. Albert’s presentation slides.

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Comparative Effectiveness of Telemedicine to Detect Diabetic Retinopathy
Dr. Steve Mansberger with the Oregon Health & Science University PRC shared preliminary results of three CER projects and discussed new partnerships for dissemination of research findings. The research was conducted in two tribal health clinics in Oregon and Kansas. The research goals are as follows:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of telemedicine to detect diabetic retinopathy when compared with traditional surveillance methods.
  • Identify the health beliefs related to adherence to annual diabetic eye exams.
  • Determine the cost-effectiveness of the telemedicine system from the perspective of the community clinic, the third-party payer, and the individual patient.

View Dr. Mansberger’s presentation slides.

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Comparing Delivery Methods of a Combined Lifestyle and Medication Adherence Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk (CVD)
Dr. Thomas Keyserling with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presented preliminary findings from the PRC CER project comparing the effectiveness of a combined lifestyle and medication adherence intervention to reduce risk of CVD when it is delivered via Internet versus via counselor. Dr. Keyserling explained that the intervention is consistent with the current literature as it incorporates findings from recent research on aspirin and cholesterol controlling drugs (statins), as well as from recent dietary research that emphasizes fat and carbohydrate quality more than quantity for cardiovascular health. In addition, Dr. Keyserling presented baseline data on study participants, including cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, history of CVD, and medication use.

View Dr. Keyserling's presentation slides



* The PRC CER projects are funded through the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. PRC researchers are conducting two-year projects that compare the benefits and harms of different public health strategies to prevent, diagnose, and monitor health conditions in community settings.

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