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Prevalence of Selected Risk Behaviors and Chronic Diseases and Conditions---Steps Communities, United States, 2006--2007

Stella Cory, MD1

Ann Ussery-Hall, MPH2

Shannon Griffin-Blake, PhD1

Alyssa Easton, PhD1

Justin Vigeant3

Lina Balluz, MPH1

William Garvin1

Kurt Greenlund, PhD1

1Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease and Prevention

2Ginn Group, Atlanta, Georgia

3Northrop Grumman, Atlanta, Georgia


Corresponding author: Stella Cory, MD, MPH, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, MS K-93, 4770 Buford Hwy, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30341. Telephone: 770-488-4187; Fax: 770-488-8488; E-mail: spk9@cdc.gov.


Abstract

Problem: At least one chronic disease or condition affects 45% of persons and account for seven of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. Persons who suffer from chronic diseases and conditions, (e.g., obesity, diabetes, and asthma) experience limitations in function, health, activity, and work, affecting the quality of their lives as well as the lives of their family. Preventable health-risk factors (e.g., insufficient physical activity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure) contribute substantially to the development and severity of certain chronic diseases and conditions.

Reporting Period Covered: 2006--2007

Description of the System: CDC's Healthy Communities Program funds communities to address chronic diseases and related risk factors through policy, systems, and environmental change strategies. As part of the Healthy Communities Program, 40 Steps communities were funded nationwide to address six focus areas: obesity, diabetes, asthma, physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure. During 2006--2007, 38 and 39 of the 40 communities conducted a survey to collect adult health outcome data. The survey instrument was a modified version of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, a state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey. The survey instrument collected information on chronic diseases and conditions, health risk behaviors, and preventive health practices related to Steps community outcomes from noninstitutionalized community members aged ≥18 years.

Results: Prevalence estimates of chronic diseases and conditions and risk behaviors varied among Steps communities that reported data for 2006 and 2007. The proportion of the population that achieved Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objectives also varied among the communities.

In 2006, the estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years being overweight or obese as calculated from self-reported weight and height ranged from 51.8% to 73.7%. The nationwide 2006 BRFSS median was 62.3%; a total of 20 communities exceeded this median. In 2007, the estimated prevalence being overweight or obese ranged from 50.5% to 77.2%. The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 63.0%; a total of 18 communities exceeded this median.

In 2006, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes (excluding gestational diabetes) ranged from 3.7% to 19.7%. None of the communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 91% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have at least an annual clinical foot examination. Six communities reached the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 76% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination; 20 communities reached the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 65% the proportion of adults who have a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement (A1c) at least once a year.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes (excluding gestational diabetes) ranged from 4.4% to 17.9%. None of the communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 91% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have at least an annual clinical foot examination, eight communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 76% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination, and 16 communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 65% the proportion of adults who have an A1c at least once a year.

In 2006, the prevalence of reported asthma ranged from 6.5% to 18.9%. Among those who reported having asthma, the prevalence of having no symptoms of asthma during the preceding 30 days ranged from 11.5% to 29.5% for five communities with sufficient data for estimates.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of reported asthma ranged from 7.5% to 18.9%. Among those who reported having asthma, the prevalence of having no symptoms of asthma during the preceding 30 days ranged from 10.3% to 36.1% for 12 communities with sufficient data for estimates.

In 2006, the prevalence of respondents who engaged in moderate physical activity for ≥30 minutes at least five times a week or who reported vigorous physical activity for ≥20 minutes at least three times a week ranged from 42.3% to 59.9%. The prevalence of consumption of fruits and vegetables at least five times/day ranged from 11.1% to 30.2%.

In 2007, the prevalence of moderate or vigorous physical activity ranged from 40.6% to 69.8%; 25 communities reached the HP 2010 objective to increase the proportion of adults who engage in physical activity to 50%. The prevalence of consumption of fruits and vegetables ≥5 times/day ranged from 14.6% to 37.6%.

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among respondents aged >18 years who reported having smoked >100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who were current smokers on every day or some days at the time of the survey ranged from 12.5% to 48.0%. Among smokers, the prevalence of having stopped smoking for ≥1 day because of trying to quit smoking during the previous 12 months ranged from 48.4% to 67.9% for 31 communities. No communities reached the HP 2010 target of increasing to 75% smoking cessation attempts by adult smokers.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of current smokers ranged from 11.2% to 33.7%. Two communities reached the HP 2010 objective to reduce the proportion of adults who smoke. Among smokers, the prevalence of having stopped smoking for ≥1 day because of trying to quit smoking during the preceding 12 months ranged from 50.8% to 69.6% for 26 communities. No communities reached the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 75% smoking cessation attempts by adult smokers.

Interpretation: The findings in this report indicate variations in health risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, and use of preventive health screenings and health services among Steps communities. These findings underscore the continued need to evaluate prevention interventions at the community level and to design and implement policies to promote and encourage healthy behaviors.

Public Health Action: Steps BRFSS data monitored the prevalence of health behaviors, conditions, and use of preventive health services. CDC (at the national level), and Steps staff at state, local, and tribal levels can use BRFSS data to demonstrate accountability to stakeholders; monitor progress in meeting objectives; focus activities on policy, systems and environmental change strategies with the greatest promise of results; identify collaboration opportunities; and identify and disseminate successes and lessons learned.

Introduction

At least one chronic disease or condition affects 45% of persons (1) and account for seven of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States (2). Chronic diseases and conditions (e.g., heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, obesity, and arthritis) account for >75% of the $2 trillion spent annually on medical care in the United States and cost the economy approximately $1 trillion a year in lost productivity (1). Preventable health-risk factors (e.g., insufficient physical activity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure) substantially contribute to the development and severity of certain chronic diseases and conditions. In 2007, <50% (3) of adults met the recommended levels for physical activity and only 24% (4) reported eating 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables/day. In addition, an estimated 20.6% (46 million) of U.S. adults were current cigarette smokers (5).

The Steps program was funded through CDC's Healthy Communities Program to use population-based community-level approaches (e.g., policy, systems, and environmental change strategies) that address multiple determinants of health (6). During 2003--2009, the Healthy Communities Program operated two Steps cooperative agreements that funded 40 communities nationwide. In 2003, CDC's Healthy Communities Program funded 12 awardees representing 24 Steps communities; in 2004, the program funded 10 additional awardees representing 16 communities. Key elements of the CDC's Healthy Communities Program include implementing evidence-based strategies; responding to community needs; reaching diverse population groups; working across multiple sectors (e.g., schools, work sites, health care, and the community); creating nontraditional partnerships; (e.g., media, businesses, transportation, public safety, and planning and development departments), and using policy, systems, and environmental change strategies to affect sustainable, community-level change. All of these elements aim to accelerate positive health changes in communities and reduce chronic diseases and conditions.

Steps communities' efforts supported policies and interventions that focused on six priority areas, comprising three health conditions or diseases (i.e., obesity, diabetes, and asthma) and three related risk behaviors (i.e., physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure). Communities were selected as part of a Request for Funding Announcement (RFA) designed to ensure inclusion of populations disproportionately affected by chronic diseases and associated risk factors; inclusion of geographic areas with high age-adjusted rates of chronic disease and associated risk factors; geographic distribution of communities nationwide; and inclusion of communities of varying sizes, including rural, suburban, and urban communities. Steps sites included small cities and rural communities (with sites coordinated at the state level), large cities and urban communities, and tribal communities. As part of the RFA, grantees participated in the Steps Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to collect data on health conditions and diseases and on related risk factors at the community level and tracked Steps communities' health outcomes and behaviors over time. This report presents data from the second and third years of funding for the Steps communities as they implemented policies and interventions to address Steps priority chronic diseases and conditions.

Methods

The Steps BRFSS survey instrument is a modified version of the BRFSS state-based survey and includes standardized questions related to the three diseases and outcomes (obesity, diabetes, and asthma) and the three related risk factors (physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure). BRFSS uses a disproportionate stratified sample design to select a representative sample of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged ≥18 years. To ensure coordinated efforts and efficient use of resources, most Steps communities used BRFSS infrastructure and capacity already in place at the national, state, and local levels to collect data. The survey instrument included standard 2006 and 2007 BRFSS questions (available at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/) related to the six priority areas. Data collection procedures or processes varied by community because of each community's particular characteristics. For example, certain Steps communities conducted a stand-alone survey whereas others coordinated data collection with the state or local BRFSS. Certain communities adapted their data collection methods to respond to local cultural needs. For the majority of communities, CDC provided technical assistance, data cleaning, weighting, and analysis of surveillance data.

Questionnaire

The 2006 and 2007 Steps BRFSS questionnaire comprised three parts: 1) core questions, 2) optional supplemental modules containing sets of questions on specific topics (e.g., diabetes, health-related quality of life, and arthritis management), and 3) community-specific questions. The questionnaires asked core and optional questions related to risk factors associated with obesity, diabetes, and asthma and the accompanying underlying risk factors of physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure. Questions from the following Core Sections of the 2006 and 2007 BRFSS National Survey were used: Healthy Days, Health Care Access, Diabetes, Asthma, Tobacco Use, Demographics, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, and Physical Activity. In addition, certain questions from the following optional modules were part of the survey: Diabetes Self Management, Adult Asthma History, and Smoking Cessation. Additional information regarding the national BRFSS standard questions is available at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/ questionnaires.

Data Collection and Processing

Thirty eight communities collected data in 2006 and 39 communities collected data in 2007* using trained interviewers to administer the survey via computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) system. In 2006, a total of 29 communities submitted their data to CDC for data reliability checks and preparation for analyses, and nine communities conducted analysis at the local level, of which seven sent weighted data to CDC's Healthy Communities Program. Among the tasks included in data reliability checks, CDC validates responses based on expected values for categorical variables. In addition, CDC checks the reliability of the disposition code assigned by the community. However, a record marked as complete might not have enough data according to CDC standards and will need to be reassigned as an incomplete record. For each community, data were collected either monthly or over a fixed period as a point in time.

Data Weighting and Analysis

Upon completion of data collection, communities submitted their data to CDC, which edited and aggregated the data files to create a sample for each community. For this analysis, each sample was weighted to the respondent's probability of selection and to the age- and sex-specific population or age-, sex-, and race-specific population data using current population estimates provided by the community or 2006 and 2007 intercensal estimates provided by Claritas, Inc., a private data vendor that uses census projections to develop yearly population estimates. These sampling weights were then used to calculate community-level prevalence estimates. Detailed weighting and analytic methodologies used for BRFSS have been reported previously (7).

Statistical Analyses

SAS(r) (release 9.1.3) and SUDAAN(r) were used in the analyses to account for the complex sampling design and to calculate prevalence estimates, standard errors, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (8,9). Statistics for selected communities were reported as "not available" if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the confidence interval half width was >10. Because those data are not included in this report and certain communities did not measure every indicator, the number of communities represented varies in 2006 (range: 5--38), and in 2007(range: 12--38).

Data Presented

Because of the slightly different methodologies, populations of interest, and primary goal of Steps projects, this report presents yearly data for Steps communities. Given the early stages of Steps, rather than compare with nonintervention communities, Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) goals were used as a benchmark. HP 2010 objectives were analyzed separately for each year so that communities could continue to track their progress. The tables in this report contain the weighted percentage, sample size, standard error, and CIs. Data for the communities that conducted their own data analysis are reported without standard errors. Standard errors are reported for the five communities that conducted their own data analysis and sent their data to CDC to produce estimates from the weighted data set that they provided. When BRFSS data and HP 2010 objective statements were comparable, nationwide BRFSS median prevalence estimates and HP 2010 targets are presented (10--12). For several questions, comparative HP 2010 goals are not presented because BRFSS data definitions are not comparable to the HP 2010 definitions.

Results

Overweight and Obesity

Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI) (weight[kg]/height [m]). Being overweight or obese was defined as having a BMI of ≥25.0 kg/m2; obesity alone was classified as BMI of ≥30.0 kg/ m2.

In 2006, the estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years being overweight or obese ranged from 51.8% (95% CI = 46.9--56.8) in Teller, Colorado, to 73.7% (95% CI = 69.4--78.0) in SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska (median: 62.6) (Table 1). The nationwide 2006 BRFSS median was 62.3%; 20 communities exceeded this median.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence among respondents aged ≥18 years who had a BMI ≥25.0 kg/m² ranged from 50.5% (95% CI = 45.6--55.4) in Teller County, Colorado, to 77.2% (95% CI = 71.5--83.0) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 63.2%) (Table 2). The 2007 nationwide BRFSS median was 63.0%; 18 communities exceeded this median.

Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, the estimated prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2) among respondents aged ≥18 years ranged from 14.6% (95% CI = 11.2--18.0) in Teller County, Colorado, to 38.3% (95% CI = 32.3--44.2) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 24.8%) (Table 3). The 2006 nationwide BRFSS median was 25.1%; 17 communities exceeded this median. One community (Teller County, Colorado) achieved the HP 2010 objective of reducing to 15% the proportion of adults who are obese (objective 19.2).

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of adults who were obese ranged from 16.6% (95% CI = 13.1--20.1) in Teller County, Colorado, to 41.0% (95% CI = 34.0--47.9) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 25.4%) (Table 4). The 2007 nationwide BRFSS median was 26.3%; 17 communities exceeded this median. No communities reached the HP 2010 objective.

Diabetes

Overall Rate of Diabetes Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, the estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported ever having been told by a doctor that they have diabetes (other than during pregnancy) ranged from 3.7% (95% CI = 2.2--5.1) in Teller, Colorado, to 19.7% (95% CI = 15.1--24.3) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 7.6%) (Table 5). The nationwide 2006 BRFSS median was 7.5%; 19 communities exceeded this median.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of adults who reported ever having been told by a doctor that they had diabetes (other than during pregnancy) ranged from 4.4% (95% CI = 3.3--5.5) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to 17.9% (95% CI = 12.5--23.2) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 8.2%) (Table 6). The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 8.1%; 19 communities exceeded this median.

Clinical Foot Examination Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diabetes

In 2006, among adults in 27 Steps communities who were ever told by a doctor that they have diabetes (excluding women who were pregnant), the estimated prevalence who reported having a clinical foot examination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 68.2% (95% CI = 61.4--74.9) in San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas, to 89.3% (95% CI = 82.8--95.7) in Willmar, Minnesota (median: 77.4%) (Table 7). The nationwide BRFSS median was 71.6%; 27 communities exceeded this median. No Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 91% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have at least an annual clinical foot examination (objective 5-14).

In 2007, among adults with diabetes in 26 communities, the estimated prevalence who reported having a clinical foot examination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 51.1% (95% CI = 41.9--60.4) in Santa Clara County, California, to 83.5% (95% CI = 75.9--91.1) in Minneapolis, Minnesota (median: 77.1%) (Table 8). The nationwide BRFSS median was 73.2%; 19 communities exceeded this median. No communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Dilated Eye Examination Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diabetes

In 2006, among adults with diabetes aged ≥18 years in 22 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence who reported having received a dilated eye examination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 63.2% (95% CI = 54.3--72.1) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 84.4% (95% CI = 78.7--90.1) in Cleveland, Ohio (median: 72.55%) (Table 9). The nationwide BRFSS median was 70.9%; 11 communities exceeded this median. Six Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 76% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination (objective 5-13).

In 2007, among 26 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence of adults with diabetes who received a dilated eye examination during the preceding 12 months ranged from 60.3% (95% CI = 51.5--69.1) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 85.4% (95% CI = 78.5--92.3) in Rochester, Minnesota (median: 72.9%) (Table 10). The nationwide BRFSS median was 71.3%; 16 communities exceeded this median. Eight communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Glycosylated Hemoglobin Measurement at Least Once a Year Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diabetes

In 2006, among adults with diabetes aged ≥18 years in 23 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence who reported having received a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement (A1c) at least once a year ranged from 62.5% (95% CI = 53.5--71.4) in Hillsborough, Florida, to 85.1% (95% CI = 76.7--93.5) in Rockland, New York (median: 70.7%) (Table 11). The nationwide BRFSS median was 66.3%; 17 communities exceeded this median. Twenty Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 65% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an A1c at least once a year (objective 5-12).

In 2007, among adults with diabetes in 22 communities, the estimated prevalence who reported having received an A1c at least once a year ranged from 54.5% (95% CI = 46.7--62.2) in San Antonio, Texas, to 90.4% (95% CI = 85.6--95.2) in Boston, Massachusetts (median: 69.9%) (Table 12). The nationwide BRFSS median was 66.3%; 16 communities exceeded this median. Sixteen communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Self Blood-Glucose Monitoring Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diabetes

In 2006, among adults with diabetes aged ≥18 years in 19 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence who reported self-blood glucose monitoring at least 2 times daily ranged from 24.8% (95% CI = 17.7--31.9) in St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida, to 51.6% (95% CI = 42.0--61.1) in Broome County, New York (median: 43.5%) (Table 13). The nationwide BRFSS median was 38.8%; 11 communities exceeded this median.

In 2007, among adults with diabetes in 23 communities, the estimated prevalence who reported self-blood glucose monitoring at least 2 times daily ranged from 28.9% (95% CI = 20.9--36.9) in Santa Clara County, California, to 53.3% (95% CI = 43.4--63.1) in Rockland County, New York (median: 41.4%) (Table 14). The nationwide BRFSS median was 38.6%; 16 communities exceeded this median.

Self-Foot Examination Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diabetes

In 2006, among adults aged ≥18 years with diabetes in 21 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence who reported checking their feet at least one time daily for any sore or irritations ranged from 57.5% (95% CI = 47.6--67.5) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to 88% (95% CI = 81.6--94.5) in Austin-Travis County, Texas (median: 69.3%) (Table 15). The nationwide BRFSS median was 68.8%; 11 communities exceeded this median.

In 2007, among adults with diabetes in 22 communities, the estimated prevalence who reported checking their feet at least once daily for any sores or irritations ranged from 59.2% (95% CI = 49.7--68.8) in Jefferson County, New York, to 80.6% (95% CI = 75.4--85.7) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma (median: 68.5%) (Table 16). The nationwide BRFSS median was 69.1%; nine communities exceeded this median.

Asthma

Told by Health Professional that they had Asthma Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, the estimated prevalence among respondents aged ≥18 years who reported being told by a health professional that they have asthma ranged from 6.5% (95% CI = 3.2--9.8) in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, to 18.9% (95% CI = 16.0--21.9) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (median: 13.1%) (Table 17). The nationwide 2006 BRFSS median was 13.0%; 19 communities exceeded this median.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of reported asthma in the Steps communities ranged from 7.5% (CI = 4.7--10.2) in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, to 18.9% (95% CI = 16.1--21.7) in Cleveland, Ohio (Table 18). The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 13.0%; 18 communities exceeded this median.

Symptom-Free Days Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Asthma

In 2006, among five steps communities, of those adults with asthma who reported having had an episode of asthma or asthma attack during the preceding 12 months, the estimated prevalence with no symptoms of asthma during the preceding 30 days ranged from 11.5% (95% CI = 6.4--16.6) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 29.5% (95% CI = 20.8--38.1) in Jefferson County, New York. Among five communities, the median was 25.6% (Table 19). The nationwide BRFSS median was 26.2%; one community exceeded this median.

In 2007, among 12 Steps communities, of those adults with asthma who reported having had an episode of asthma or an asthma attack during the preceding 12 months, the estimated prevalence who reported having no symptoms during the preceding 30 days ranged from 10.3% (95% CI = 4.8--15.7) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 36.1% (95% CI = 26.7--45.4) in DeKalb County, Georgia. Among 12 communities, the median was 21.5% (Table 20). The nationwide BRFSS median was 27.1%; two communities exceeded this median.

Physical Activity

Recommended Physical Activity Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, among 22 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence among adults who reported engaging in moderate physical activity for ≥30 minutes at least five times/week or who reported vigorous physical activity for ≥20 minutes at least three times/week ranged from 42.3% (95% CI = 37.5--47.1) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 59.9% (95% CI = 55.2--64.7) in SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska. Among these 22 communities, the median was 52.4% (Table 21). Seventeen Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 50% the proportion of adults engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity (objective 22-02)

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of adults who reported moderate or vigorous physical activity ranged from 40.6% (95% CI = 36.3--44.8) in Southeast Alabama, to 69.8% (95% CI = 62.4--77.2) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan (median: 51.5%) (Table 22). The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 49.2%; 26 communities exceeded this median. A total of 25 Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Fruits and Vegetables

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, among 22 Steps communities, the percentage of respondents aged 18 years who reported eating at least five fruits and vegetables/day ranged from 11.1% (95% CI = 8.0--14.2) in Inter-Tribal Council, Michigan, to 30.2 (95% CI = 27.6--32.8) in St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota (median: 26.4%) (Table 23)§.

In 2007, the estimated prevalence among respondents aged ≥18 years who reported eating fruits and vegetables ≥5 times/day ranged from 14.6% (95% CI = 2.3--16.9) in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma, to 37.6% (95% CI = 34.3--40.9) in Salinas-Monterey County, California (median: 26.4%) (Table 24). The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 24.3%; 25 communities exceeded this median.

Tobacco Use

Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, among 37 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence of respondents aged 18 years who reported having smoked 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and were current smokers on every day or certain days ranged from 12.5% (95% CI = 10.4--14.7) in Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota, to 48.0% (95% CI = 27.0--69.6) in Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington (median: 19.6%) (Table 25). The nationwide 2006 BRFSS median was 20.1; 18 communities exceeded this median. No Steps community achieved the HP 2010 objective of reducing to 12% the proportion of adults who smoke cigarettes (objective 27-1a).

In 2007, the estimated prevalence of adult current smokers ranged from 11.2% (95% CI = 9.0--13.4) in Rockland County, New York, to 33.7% (95% CI = 30.3--37.0) in Cleveland, Ohio (median: 21.1%) (Table 26). The nationwide 2007 BRFSS median was 19.7%; 21 communities exceeded this median. Two Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Tobacco Use Cessation Attempts by Adult Smokers Aged ≥18 Years

In 2006, among adult smokers in 31 Steps communities, the estimated prevalence of who reported having stopped smoking for one day or longer because they were trying to quit smoking during the preceding 12 months ranged from 48.4% (95% CI = 42.2--54.5) in St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida, to 67.9% (95% CI = 59.3--76.5) in Austin-Travis County, Texas (median: 58.4%) (Table 27). No Steps communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 75% smoking cessation attempts by adult smokers (objective 27-5).

In 2007, among adult smokers in 26 communities, the estimated prevalence of smokers who reported having stopped smoking for one day or longer during the preceding 12 months because they were trying to quit smoking ranged from 50.8% (95% CI = 43.4--58.2) in Chautauqua County, New York, to 69.6% (95% CI = 62.2--77.1) in Pueblo County, Colorado (median: 55.4%) (Table 28). The nationwide BRFSS median was 57.6%; eight communities exceeded this median. No communities achieved the HP 2010 objective.

Discussion

CDC's Healthy Communities Program responds to community needs and works to affect change at the population level using community-based approaches that include policy, systems, and environmental change. As part of the Healthy Communities Program, Steps communities were funded across the country to demonstrate how local initiatives across sectors (e.g., schools, work sites, health care, and the community) in collaboration with traditional and nontraditional partners (e.g., media, businesses, transportation, public safety, and departments of planning and development) can impact the burden of chronic diseases and conditions (e.g., obesity, diabetes, and asthma), and the underlying risk factors of physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use and exposure. For example, approximately 100 work site interventions, advancing policy, systems, and environmental changes were implemented, including implementation of health risk assessments and policies promoting increased access to nutritious foods in vending machines and at meetings. Other strategies used in work sites included development of smoke-free policies and onsite space for exercise. By focusing on joining resources and perspectives of a wide range of sectors and entities dedicated to collaboration for health improvement, the Healthy Communities Program draws on common interests and accelerates progress toward health promotion efforts. Such efforts create measurable improvements in the health of Steps communities through the selection, implementation, and evaluation of interventions promoting policy, systems, and environmental change. For example, the Steps Program in Austin, Texas, partnered with Capital Metro, the Austin transit authority, to implement a worksite wellness program. As a result of worksite wellness program implementation, the Capital Metro has experienced substantial reductions in its health care costs.

The findings in this report indicate variations in the estimated prevalence of chronic diseases and conditions, health-risk behaviors, and use of preventive screening practices across Steps communities. In 2006, six communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 76% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination; eight communities achieved the objective in 2007. In 2006, a total of 20 communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 65% the proportion of adults who have an A1c at least once a year; 16 communities achieved the objective in 2007. In 2006, no Steps community achieved the HP 2010 objective of reducing to 12% the proportion of adults who smoke; two communities achieved the objective in 2007. In 2006, a total of 17 communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 50% the proportion of adults who engage in moderate physical activity ≥30 minutes/day at least 5 days a week, or vigorous physical activity ≥20 minutes/day at least 3 days a week; 25 communities achieved the objective in 2007. In 2006, one community achieved the HP 2010 objective of reducing to 15% the proportion of adults who are obese; no communities achieved this objective in 2007. No communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 75% smoking cessation attempts by adult smokers in 2006 or 2007. In 2007, no communities achieved the HP 2010 objective of increasing to 91% the proportion of adults with diabetes who have at least an annual clinical foot examination.

The direct estimates might be different from those using similar geographic units but based on other small area analysis methods (12). For example, estimates of diabetes and obesity presented here might be slightly different from those using small area analysis methods. Steps communities will need to continue to monitor data and continue to focus on improving health to achieve and maintain these improvements.

Steps communities' use of BRFSS questions for community-specific surveys permits useful collection of data at the local level. Data presented in this report indicate that prevalence rates of important chronic disease indicators vary widely among the communities. This variability might reflect differences in state and local laws and policies, enforcement practices, availability of effective community policies and interventions, prevailing behavioral and social norms, demographic and adult practices, characteristics of the population, and other social determinants of health.

Collection of Steps BRFSS data will provide trend estimates that will enable community-to-community, nationwide, and HP 2010 comparisons. These data also will provide useful information for decision making at the community, district, and state levels and guide local health officials and decision makers in intervention planning and evaluation. CDC staff and other public health and education practitioners can use these data to assess changes in these behaviors over time and assist in evaluating the effectiveness of Steps communities' interventions. An examination of the variations among communities can identify which ones would benefit from additional technical assistance related to effective community policies and interventions. Differences also can alert community representatives to the opportunity to learn from each other by taking advantage of the national Steps network. Communities can use these data to identify, prioritize, and develop community-specific activities to address obesity, diabetes, and asthma by increasing physical activity, encouraging healthy eating, and reducing tobacco use and exposure.

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, the Steps BRFSS survey is a telephone-based survey, which only queries persons with landline telephone access. Differences might exist in the characteristics of persons who reside in households with telephones compared with those without telephone access or those households that use cell phones only. Therefore, the data might not be generalizable to persons who reside in households without landline telephones. Second, prevalence estimates are self-reported and, for certain behaviors, the reported estimates might be subject to recall and social desirability biases. Third, each Steps community has the option to administer its own data collection method, which might preclude standardization in certain cases. Fourth, the number of interviews ranged from 464 to 2,934. Therefore, estimates for certain communities are based on small sample sizes, and for relatively rare events might yield unstable estimates. Fifth, Steps BRFSS does not collect information from institutionalized persons, thereby excluding persons residing in nursing homes, long-term care, and correctional facilities.

BRFSS offers important benefits for making community-to-community comparisons because of its standardized questionnaire and data collection. BRFSS provides data to guide additional analysis on selected risk factors. The information is invaluable for assisting local health officials in intervention planning and evaluation.

Conclusion

Steps BRFSS data collected in the communities will be used to examine whether the Steps communities made progress on intended health outcomes in the selected intervention areas. BRFSS is a unique surveillance tool that demonstrates its usefulness at gathering comparable state-specific and local area health behavioral data, monitoring health risk behaviors over time, and supporting focused prevention interventions. Steps staff at the national, state, local, and tribal levels will use these data for decision-making, planning, and enhancing technical assistance. CDC's Healthy Communities Program, through Steps and other community funding models, strives toward achieving the established HP 2010 objectives by using BRFSS data to enhance existing program activities, focus efforts on activities with the greatest promise of results, identify opportunities for strategic collaboration, and disseminate lessons learned.

References

  1. Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease (PFCD). Almanac of chronic disease, 2008 edition. Available at http://www.fightchronicdisease.org. Accessed January 28, 2010.
  2. Heron M, Hoyert D, Murphy S, et al. Deaths: final data for 2006. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2009;57(14). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_14.pdf. Accessed January 8, 2010.
  3. Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System. Prevalence and trends data, nationwide---2007 physical activity. Available at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss/display.asp?cat=&yr=2007&qkey=4418&state=US. Accessed January 8, 2010.
  4. Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System. Prevalence and trends data, nationwide---2007 fruits and vegetables. Available at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss/display.asp?cat=&yr=2007&qkey=4415&state=. Accessed January 8, 2010.
  5. CDC. Cigarette smoking among adults and trends in smoking cessation---United States, 2008. MMWR 2009; 58:1227--32.
  6. CDC Healthy communities program. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/healthycommunitiesprogram. Accessed January 8, 2010.
  7. CDC. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System operational and user's guide, version 3.0. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2004.
  8. SAS Institute, Inc. SAS(r) version 8.02 [software and documentation]. Cary, NC: SAS Institute; 2001.
  9. Research Triangle Institute. SUDAAN(r), version 9 [software and documentation]. Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute; 2004.
  10. US Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy people 2010: national health promotion and disease prevention objective---full report, with commentary. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, US Public Health Service; 2000. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/otgeract/hpdata2010/abouthp.htm. Accessed January 8, 2010.
  11. CDC Wonder. The healthy people 2010 database. Available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010. Accessed January 14, 2010.
  12. Demeny P, McNicoll G, eds. Encyclopedia of Population. Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference; 2003:898--901.

* In 2006, Orleans Parish, Louisiana did not collect data because of displacement of population after Hurricane Katrina. In 2006 and 2007, the Tohono O'odham Tribe, did not report data because BRFSS does not include persons residing in households without telephones. The community's low telephone coverage precluded reaching the numbers required for standard sampling methodology.

The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.

§ BRFSS did not have a nationwide estimate for fruits and vegetables for 2006.


TABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥25.0 kg/m² calculated from self-reported weight and height, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

982

67.4

2.0

(63.5--71.3)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,073

68.0

2.0

(64.1--71.9)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

587

73.7

2.2

(69.4--78.0)

Cochise County, Arizona

466

60.9

3.1

(54.9--66.9)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

446

63.4

3.0

(57.6--69.3)

Yuma County, Arizona

474

71.3

2.5

(66.3--76.2)

Salinas County, California

1,560

63.9

1.6

(60.8--67.0)

Santa Clara County, California

1,342

58.4

1.8

(54.8--61.9)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,041

57.7

1.9

(54.0--61.4)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,020

61.5

1.8

(58.0--65.0)

Teller County, Colorado

555

51.8

2.5

(46.9--56.8)

Weld County, Colorado

1,015

62.5

1.9

(58.8--66.2)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,504

63.9

1.5

(60.9--66.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,617

61.4

1.4

(58.5--64.2)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,527

56.2

1.4

(53.5--58.8)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,568

54.0

§

(50.2--57.9)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

550

69.7

3.2

(63.5--75.9)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,681

56.3

1.5

(53.4--59.3)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,534

56.3

1.5

(53.3--59.3)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,453

55.6

1.7

(52.3--58.9)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,137

63.5

1.9

(59.8--67.2)

Broome County, New York

1,401

60.0

1.8

(56.5--63.5)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,432

59.6

1.8

(56.1--63.1)

Jefferson County, New York

1,439

62.6

1.9

(58.8--66.4)

Rockland County, New York

1,411

56.7

1.7

(53.4--59.9)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,409

68.9

1.7

(65.6--72.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,365

69.0

1.8

(65.4--72.6)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,459

66.8

1.8

(63.4--70.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

2,581

66.6

1.1

(64.3--68.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,583

63.3

1.1

(61.1--65.5)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,417

63.6

1.7

(60.2--66.9)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,433

62.8

2.6

(57.7--67.9)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,566

70.4

1.6

(67.1--73.6)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,457

59.8

1.8

(56.4--63.3)

Clark County, Washington

1,463

63.2

1.6

(60.1--66.3)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

36

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,012

56.3

1.9

(52.6--59.9)

Thurston County, Washington

1,502

59.9

1.6

(56.7--63.1)

Range

51.8--73.7

Median

62.6

BRFSS Nationwide Range

54.6--67.0

BRFSS Nationwide Median

62.3

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.


TABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥25.0 kg/m² calculated from self-reported weight and height, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,331

68.0

1.8

(64.4--71.6)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,102

71.6

2.0

(67.7--75.5)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

571

74.1

2.3

(69.7--78.5)

Cochise County, Arizona

445

62.9

3.2

(56.6--69.2)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

64.5

2.8

(59.0--70.0)

Yuma County, Arizona

527

71.1

2.7

(65.9--76.4)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,603

70.3

1.6

(67.2--73.5)

Santa Clara County, California

1,345

62.5

1.8

(58.9--66.0)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,017

60.5

1.9

(56.8--64.2)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,036

62.8

2.0

(58.9--66.6)

Teller County, Colorado

572

50.5

2.5

(45.6--55.4)

Weld County, Colorado

979

63.7

2.0

(59.7--67.6)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,445

61.8

1.9

(58.1--65.4)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,518

64.0

1.8

(60.5--67.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,194

58.1

1.6

(55.1--61.2)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,424

54.3

2.0

(50.4--58.2)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,490

57.5

§

(53.5--61.5)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

563

77.2

2.9

(71.5--83.0)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,462

57.1

1.9

(53.4--60.9)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,487

51.6

1.9

(47.9--55.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,514

57.0

2.0

(53.0--61.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

939

60.6

2.3

(56.0--65.2)

Broome County, New York

1,411

58.5

1.9

(54.8--62.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,422

61.7

1.8

(58.1--65.2)

Jefferson County, New York

1,432

64.6

1.8

(61.1--68.0)

Rockland County, New York

1,420

57.5

1.8

(54.0--60.9)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,155

69.6

1.8

(66.1--73.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,848

66.8

1.7

(63.5--70.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,431

64.8

1.8

(61.4--68.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,732

66.7

1.4

(64.0--69.5)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,296

64.8

1.2

(62.5--67.1)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,452

68.2

1.7

(64.9--71.5)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,379

56.6

2.5

(51.7--61.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,443

70.6

1.7

(67.2--74.0)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,503

63.0

1.7

(59.7--66.3)

Clark County, Washington

1,602

64.9

1.7

(61.6--68.1)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

35

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,400

60.0

1.7

(56.7--63.3)

Thurston County, Washington

1,860

63.3

1.5

(60.5--66.2)

Range

50.5--77.2

Median

63.2

BRFSS Nationwide Range

55.3--69.1

BRFSS Nationwide Median

63.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.


TABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30.0 kg/m² calculated from self-reported weight and height, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

982

29.2

1.9

(25.5--33.0)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,073

35.8

1.9

(32.0--39.6)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

587

36.6

2.4

(31.9--41.4)

Cochise County, Arizona

466

26.2

2.8

(20.7--31.6)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

446

25.6

2.7

(20.2--30.9)

Yuma County, Arizona

474

30.9

3.1

(24.9--36.9)

Salinas County, California

1,560

23.5

1.3

(21.0--26.0)

Santa Clara County, California

1,342

22.0

1.4

(19.1--24.8)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,041

24.3

1.7

(21.0--27.6)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,020

25.5

1.6

(22.2--28.7)

Teller County, Colorado

555

14.6

1.7

(11.2--18.0)

Weld County, Colorado

1,015

24.0

1.6

(20.9--27.1)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,504

27.1

1.5

(24.2--29.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,617

22.0

1.2

(19.7--24.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,527

21.5

1.0

(19.5--23.5)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,568

22.1

§

(19.3--24.8)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

550

38.3

3.0

(32.3--44.2)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,681

21.0

1.2

(18.8--23.3)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,534

19.7

1.2

(17.4--22.0)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,453

20.0

1.2

(17.6--22.3)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,137

22.6

1.5

(19.7--25.6)

Broome County, New York

1,401

22.9

1.4

(20.1--25.7)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,432

24.8

1.5

(21.9--27.6)

Jefferson County, New York

1,439

24.8

1.4

(21.9--27.6)

Rockland County, New York

1,411

20.2

1.3

(17.6--22.8)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,409

33.9

1.7

(30.6--37.3)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,365

35.9

1.9

(32.2--39.5)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,459

31.9

1.6

(28.8--34.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

2,581

29.3

1.0

(27.3--31.4)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,583

26.4

1.0

(24.4--28.4)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,417

29.1

1.5

(26.2--32.0)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,433

26.3

2.0

(22.3--30.3)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,566

33.8

1.6

(30.7--36.9)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,457

23.2

1.4

(20.5--25.9)

Clark County, Washington

1,463

24.7

1.3

(22.1--27.3)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

36

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,012

20.8

1.5

(17.8--23.8)

Thurston County, Washington

1,502

24.1

1.3

(21.5--26.7)

Range

14.6--38.3

Median

24.8

BRFSS Nationwide Range

18.2--31.4

BRFSS Nationwide Median

25.1

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

15.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30.0 kg/m² calculated from self-reported weight and height, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,331

34.1

1.8

(30.6--37.7)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,102

37.0

2.1

(32.8--41.1)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

571

36.2

2.6

(31.1--41.2)

Cochise County, Arizona

445

25.5

2.8

(20.0--31.0)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

25.5

2.5

(20.6--30.4)

Yuma County, Arizona

527

24.4

2.2

(20.1--28.7)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,603

30.6

1.6

(27.4--33.8)

Santa Clara County, California

1,345

25.0

1.7

(21.7--28.2)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,017

22.9

1.6

(19.8--26.0)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,036

25.2

1.7

(21.9--28.4)

Teller County, Colorado

572

16.6

1.8

(13.1--20.1)

Weld County, Colorado

979

26.5

1.7

(23.1--29.8)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,445

24.2

1.5

(21.3--27.2)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,518

24.3

1.6

(21.2--27.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,194

23.5

1.3

(21.0--26.0)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,424

22.9

1.5

(20.0--25.8)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,490

22.8

§

(19.8--25.8)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

563

41.0

3.5

(34.0--47.9)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,462

23.9

1.5

(20.9--26.9)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,487

17.9

1.4

(15.2--20.7)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,514

21.7

1.5

(18.7--24.7)

Willmar, Minnesota

939

23.2

1.7

(19.9--26.6)

Broome County, New York

1,411

24.7

1.5

(21.8--27.6)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,422

23.6

1.5

(20.8--26.4)

Jefferson County, New York

1,432

29.1

1.6

(26.0--32.3)

Rockland County, New York

1,420

18.9

1.3

(16.4--21.3)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,155

34.7

1.8

(31.2--38.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,848

31.8

1.6

(28.6--35.0)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,431

32.7

1.7

(29.5--35.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,732

30.6

1.3

(28.0--33.2)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,296

27.9

1.1

(25.7--30.1)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,452

31.4

1.5

(28.4--34.3)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,379

23.6

1.8

(20.0--27.1)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,443

33.3

1.7

(30.0--36.7)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,503

26.4

1.6

(23.3--29.5)

Clark County, Washington

1,602

28.6

1.5

(25.7--31.4)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

35

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,400

23.2

1.4

(20.6--25.9)

Thurston County, Washington

1,860

26.8

1.3

(24.3--29.3)

Range

16.6--41.0

Median

25.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

19.3--32.6

BRFSS Nationwide Median

26.3

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

15.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported ever having been told by a doctor that they had diabetes (other than during pregnancy), by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,027

9.5

1.0

(7.5--11.4)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,116

9.4

0.9

(7.6--11.2)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

610

6.3

1.0

(4.3--8.3)

Cochise County, Arizona

493

7.5

1.2

(5.1--10.0)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

7.6

1.3

(5.0--10.1)

Yuma County, Arizona

522

10.0

1.5

(7.1--12.9)

Salinas County, California

1,640

7.0

0.7

(5.6--8.4)

Santa Clara County, California

1,484

8.5

0.9

(6.8--10.2)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,083

6.8

0.8

(5.2--8.4)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,081

8.7

0.9

(7.0--10.5)

Teller County, Colorado

580

3.7

0.8

(2.2--5.1)

Weld County, Colorado

1,071

5.1

0.7

(3.7--6.4)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,556

10.2

0.9

(8.5--11.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,663

9.2

0.8

(7.7--10.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,761

7.5

0.6

(6.3--8.6)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,668

6.6

§

(5.5--7.7)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

565

19.7

2.3

(15.1--24.3)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,746

5.9

0.6

(4.8--7.0)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,604

5.9

0.6

(4.7--7.0)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,503

5.1

0.5

(4.1--6.1)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,201

6.2

0.7

(4.8--7.6)

Broome County, New York

1,487

7.6

0.7

(6.2--9.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,495

7.7

0.7

(6.4--9.1)

Jefferson County, New York

1,516

7.8

0.8

(6.2--9.4)

Rockland County, New York

1,484

7.3

0.8

(5.7--8.9)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,500

10.8

0.9

(9.0--12.6)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,497

11.3

1.0

(9.3--13.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,526

10.8

0.9

(9.0--12.6)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

2,711

10.6

0.6

(9.3--11.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,706

8.8

0.6

(7.7--9.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,503

8.9

0.8

(7.4--10.4)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,574

4.7

0.7

(3.3--6.1)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,689

13.5

0.9

(11.7--15.3)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,542

6.9

0.8

(5.5--8.4)

Clark County, Washington

1,524

6.6

0.7

(5.4--7.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

37

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,063

7.1

0.9

(5.4--8.8)

Thurston County, Washington

1,582

6.6

0.7

(5.3--7.8)

Range

3.7--19.7

Median

7.6

BRFSS Nationwide Range

5.3--12.1

BRFSS Nationwide Median

7.5

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.


TABLE 6. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported ever having been told by a doctor that they had diabetes (other than during pregnancy), by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,331

68.0

1.8

(64.4--71.6)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,102

71.6

2.0

(67.7--75.5)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

571

74.1

2.3

(69.7--78.5)

Cochise County, Arizona

445

62.9

3.2

(56.6--69.2)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

64.5

2.8

(59.0--70.0)

Yuma County, Arizona

527

71.1

2.7

(65.9--76.4)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,603

70.3

1.6

(67.2--73.5)

Santa Clara County, California

1,345

62.5

1.8

(58.9--66.0)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,017

60.5

1.9

(56.8--64.2)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,036

62.8

2.0

(58.9--66.6)

Teller County, Colorado

572

50.5

2.5

(45.6--55.4)

Weld County, Colorado

979

63.7

2.0

(59.7--67.6)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,445

61.8

1.9

(58.1--65.4)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,518

64.0

1.8

(60.5--67.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,194

58.1

1.6

(55.1--61.2)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,424

54.3

2.0

(50.4--58.2)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,490

57.5

§

(53.5--61.5)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

563

77.2

2.9

(71.5--83.0)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,462

57.1

1.9

(53.4--60.9)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,487

51.6

1.9

(47.9--55.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,514

57.0

2.0

(53.0--61.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

939

60.6

2.3

(56.0--65.2)

Broome County, New York

1,411

58.5

1.9

(54.8--62.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,422

61.7

1.8

(58.1--65.2)

Jefferson County, New York

1,432

64.6

1.8

(61.1--68.0)

Rockland County, New York

1,420

57.5

1.8

(54.0--60.9)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,155

69.6

1.8

(66.1--73.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,848

66.8

1.7

(63.5--70.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,431

64.8

1.8

(61.4--68.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,732

66.7

1.4

(64.0--69.5)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,296

64.8

1.2

(62.5--67.1)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,452

68.2

1.7

(64.9--71.5)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,379

56.6

2.5

(51.7--61.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,443

70.6

1.7

(67.2--74.0)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,503

63.0

1.7

(59.7--66.3)

Clark County, Washington

1,602

64.9

1.7

(61.6--68.1)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

35

---

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,400

60.0

1.7

(56.7--63.3)

Thurston County, Washington

1,860

63.3

1.5

(60.5--66.2)

Range

50.5--77.2

Median

63.2

BRFSS Nationwide Range

55.3--69.1

BRFSS Nationwide Median

63.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.


TABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having a clinical foot examination during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

116

75.7

4.7

(66.5--84.9)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

142

72.7

4.2

(64.5--81.0)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

50

---§

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

41

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

56

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

142

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

Mesa County, Colorado

86

81.4

4.6

(72.5--90.3)

Pueblo County, Colorado

118

77.3

4.3

(68.9--85.7)

Teller County, Colorado

27

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

74

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

173

74.4

3.8

(67.0--81.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

160

77.3

3.6

(70.1--84.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

314

84.3

2.6

(79.2--89.4)

Boston, Massachusetts

191

84.5

**

(78.8--90.2)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

114

---

**

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

128

83.0

3.7

(75.7--90.3)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

115

79.8

4.3

(71.4--88.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

108

80.6

3.9

(72.9--88.2)

Willmar, Minnesota

94

89.3

3.3

(82.8--95.7)

Broome County, New York

148

79.3

4.5

(70.5--88.0)

Chautauqua County, New York

154

87.7

2.8

(82.2--93.1)

Jefferson County, New York

157

78.2

3.9

(70.6--85.8)

Rockland County, New York

126

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

197

77.4

4.3

(69.0--85.7)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

534

72.7

4.4

(64.2--81.2)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

189

76.5

3.8

(69.2--83.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

326

77.8

2.5

(72.9--82.7)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

277

77.3

2.8

(71.8--82.7)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

154

74.7

3.9

(67.1--82.3)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

140

85.6

4.8

(76.2--94.9)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

303

68.2

3.5

(61.4--74.9)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

142

77.2

4.5

(68.4--85.9)

Clark County, Washington

127

89.1

2.8

(83.6--94.5)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

Seattle-King County, Washington

87

77.0

5.0

(67.2--86.8)

Thurston County, Washington

137

74.7

5.0

(65.0--84.4)

Range

68.2--89.3

Median

77.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

44.6--88.3

BRFSS Nationwide Median

71.6

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

91.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having a clinical foot examination during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

181

66.2

4.5

(57.4--74.9)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

173

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

51

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

59

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

77

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

171

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

193

51.1

4.7

(41.9--60.4)

Mesa County, Colorado

70

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

125

69.9

4.9

(60.4--79.4)

Teller County, Colorado

35

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

86

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

175

77.3

4.2

(69.0--85.6)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

186

69.5

4.6

(60.4--78.6)

DeKalb County, Georgia

242

80.8

3.6

(73.8--87.7)

New Orleans, Louisiana

154

72.8

4.4

(64.2--81.4)

Boston, Massachusetts

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

105

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

136

79.6

4.3

(71.3--87.9)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

112

83.5

3.9

(75.9--91.1)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

111

80.4

3.9

(72.6--88.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

91

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

152

80.6

3.8

(73.1--88.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

185

75.5

4.1

(67.5--83.6)

Jefferson County, New York

167

72.2

4.7

(63.1--81.3)

Rockland County, New York

147

83.3

4.1

(75.2--91.3)

Cleveland, Ohio

195

81.0

3.2

(74.8--87.2)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

411

73.4

3.2

(67.1--79.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

176

75.7

4.1

(67.7--83.7)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

210

79.4

3.2

(73.1--85.7)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

240

79.6

3.0

(73.8--85.5)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

163

75.6

4.1

(67.6--83.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

167

76.5

4.9

(66.8--86.1)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

304

72.2

3.4

(65.6--78.8)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

145

82.1

3.7

(74.8--89.3)

Clark County, Washington

179

77.6

3.6

(70.7--84.6)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

Seattle-King County, Washington

146

78.7

4.2

(70.5--86.8)

Thurston County, Washington

178

76.9

4.2

(68.7--85.2)

Range

51.1--83.5

Median

77.1

BRFSS Nationwide Range

40.0--87.1

BRFSS Nationwide Median

73.2

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

91.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having received a dilated eye examination during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

123

---§

---

---

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

149

76.6

4.2

(68.3--84.9)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

51

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

42

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

60

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

142

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

142

69.7

5.1

(59.7--79.6)

Mesa County, Colorado

89

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

118

75.9

4.7

(66.7--85.0)

Teller County, Colorado

27

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

73

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

186

68.4

4.3

(59.9--76.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

172

75.4

3.8

(68.0--82.8)

DeKalb County, Georgia

331

69.9

4.5

(61.1--78.7)

Boston, Massachusetts

199

84.4

(78.7--90.1)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

115

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

124

81.5

3.9

(73.8--89.1)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

119

69.5

4.9

(60.0--79.0)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

110

82.0

4.1

(74.0--90.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

96

---

---

Broome County, New York

150

66.0

5.0

(56.3--75.7)

Chautauqua County, New York

157

75.9

3.9

(68.3--83.5)

Jefferson County, New York

159

65.9

4.9

(56.3--75.4)

Rockland County, New York

130

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

195

83.4

3.6

(76.2--90.5)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

550

63.2

4.5

(54.3--72.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

197

76.1

3.7

(68.8--83.4)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

336

64.3

3.0

(58.4--70.2)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

285

72.0

3.1

(66.0--78.1)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

159

68.6

4.2

(60.4--76.8)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

145

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

312

70.9

3.1

(64.9--76.9)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

149

---

---

Clark County, Washington

133

73.1

4.6

(64.1--82.1)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

**

**

**

**

Seattle-King County, Washington

89

---

---

Thurston County, Washington

140

74.2

4.8

(64.9--83.6)

Range

63.2--83.4

Median

72.0

BRFSS Nationwide Range

58.7--80.6

BRFSS Nationwide Median

70.9

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

76.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having received a dilated eye examination during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

183

65.5

4.6

(56.4--74.6)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

180

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

53

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

60

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

83

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

175

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

192

64.4

4.9

(54.8--74.0)

Mesa County, Colorado

69

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

123

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

36

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

91

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

185

76.4

4.2

(68.1--84.7)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

198

74.3

4.1

(66.4--82.3)

DeKalb County, Georgia

250

70.1

4.1

(62.1--78.0)

New Orleans, Louisiana

157

66.2

5.0

(56.4--76.0)

Boston, Massachusetts

172

80.0

(71.9--88.2)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

105

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

139

---

---

---

Minneapolis, Minnesota

118

81.0

4.7

(71.9--90.1)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

114

85.4

3.5

(78.5--92.3)

Willmar, Minnesota

93

79.4

4.8

(69.9--88.8)

Broome County, New York

155

77.5

3.6

(70.5--84.6)

Chautauqua County, New York

184

69.9

4.3

(61.5--78.3)

Jefferson County, New York

171

73.3

4.0

(65.4--81.2)

Rockland County, New York

145

76.7

4.3

(68.2--85.1)

Cleveland, Ohio

190

73.6

3.9

(66.0--81.2)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

414

60.3

4.5

(51.5--69.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

188

68.1

4.5

(59.2--77.0)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

223

64.8

3.8

(57.5--72.2)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

246

75.9

3.0

(70.0--81.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

167

68.9

4.4

(60.3--77.5)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

166

79.2

4.5

(70.5--88.0)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

313

72.5

3.1

(66.4--78.6)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

149

74.6

4.3

(66.1--83.1)

Clark County, Washington

180

72.0

4.0

(64.1--79.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

5

---

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

153

63.9

4.6

(54.9--73.0)

Thurston County, Washington

183

71.7

4.4

(63.1--80.3)

Range

60.3--85.4

Median

72.9

BRFSS Nationwide Range

60.0--82.2

BRFSS Nationwide Median

71.3

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

76.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having received a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement (A1c) at least twice a year, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

105

72.3

5.1

(62.4--82.2)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

122

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

50

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

42

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

33

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

50

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

134

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

Mesa County, Colorado

84

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

109

75.7

4.5

(66.9--84.5)

Teller County, Colorado

24

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

72

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

163

62.5

4.6

(53.5--71.4)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

140

70.5

4.4

(61.9--79.0)

DeKalb County, Georgia

308

67.1

4.6

(58.1--76.1)

Boston, Massachusetts

183

70.1

**

(62.5--77.7)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

107

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

121

---

---

---

Minneapolis, Minnesota

104

70.8

5.1

(60.8--80.8)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

101

71.6

4.7

(62.3--80.9)

Willmar, Minnesota

91

81.6

4.2

(73.5--89.8)

Broome County, New York

138

75.8

4.8

(66.4--85.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

146

79.8

3.7

(72.5--87.1)

Jefferson County, New York

148

72.4

4.4

(63.8--80.9)

Rockland County, New York

125

85.1

4.3

(76.7--93.5)

Cleveland, Ohio

163

66.4

5.1

(56.5--76.3)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

522

71.0

4.3

(62.6--79.5)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

178

62.6

4.3

(54.1--71.1)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

312

66.6

3.1

(60.5--72.7)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

260

65.3

3.3

(58.7--71.8)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

151

66.3

4.3

(58.0--74.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

131

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

273

65.5

3.4

(58.8--72.3)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

138

67.5

5.1

(57.5--77.4)

Clark County, Washington

124

77.8

4.1

(69.7--85.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

4

---

**

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

81

---

---

---

Thurston County, Washington

137

---

---

---

Range

62.5--85.1

Median

70.65

BRFSS Nationwide Range

46.8--76.7

BRFSS Nationwide Median

66.3

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

72.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 12. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported having received a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement (A1c) at least twice a year, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

162

63.3

4.7

(54.0--72.5)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

164

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

47

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

46

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

55

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

75

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

166

62.4

4.9

(52.7--72.0)

Santa Clara County, California

Mesa County, Colorado

65

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

108

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

35

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

83

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

167

66.5

4.8

(57.1--76.0)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

181

69.2

4.7

(59.9--78.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

228

68.9

4.7

(59.6--78.2)

New Orleans, Louisiana

141

63.5

4.8

(54.0--73.0)

Boston, Massachusetts

172

90.4

**

(85.6--95.2)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

93

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

135

---

---

---

Minneapolis, Minnesota

109

---

---

---

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

105

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

92

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

147

72.5

4.5

(63.8--81.2)

Chautauqua County, New York

173

69.4

4.6

(60.5--78.4)

Jefferson County, New York

163

71.5

4.8

(62.2--80.8)

Rockland County, New York

139

78.4

3.8

(71.0--85.9)

Cleveland, Ohio

156

74.3

4.0

(66.3--82.2)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

395

72.6

4.3

(64.2--81.0)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

166

64.8

5

(55.0--74.5)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

202

72.9

3.5

(65.9--79.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

230

66.8

3.7

(59.5--73.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

154

61.3

4.7

(52.1--70.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

145

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

277

54.5

4

(46.7--62.2)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

141

78.7

4.1

(70.7--86.8)

Clark County, Washington

175

74.8

3.8

(67.3--82.2)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

5

---

**

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

143

73.1

4.5

(64.3--81.9)

Thurston County, Washington

185

70.4

3.8

(62.8--77.9)

Range

54.5--90.4

Median

69.9

BRFSS Nationwide Range

46.9--78.6

BRFSS Nationwide Median

66.3

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

72.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator in 2007.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 13. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported self-blood glucose monitoring at least two times daily, by community --- United States Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

123

30.9

5.0

(21.0--40.7)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

147

47.4

4.9

(37.7--57.0)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

52

---§

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

43

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

59

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

142

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

139

---

---

---

Mesa County, Colorado

88

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

118

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

27

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

75

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

184

36.4

4.3

(28.1--44.8)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

168

24.8

3.6

(17.7--31.9)

DeKalb County, Georgia

334

37.0

3.7

(29.7--44.2)

Boston, Massachusetts

195

47

(38.9--55.1)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

113

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

127

43.7

5.0

(33.9--53.5)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

115

---

---

---

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

110

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

95

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

148

51.6

4.9

(42.0--61.1)

Chautauqua County, New York

158

35.5

4.3

(27.1--44.0)

Jefferson County, New York

160

---

---

---

Rockland County, New York

128

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

210

43.5

4.5

(34.7--52.2)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

552

45.2

4.9

(35.6--54.9)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

199

50.4

4.4

(41.8--58.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

340

35.0

2.9

(29.3--40.7)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

283

47.4

3.4

(40.9--54.0)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

158

46.6

4.5

(37.8--55.4)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

147

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

311

39.5

3.5

(32.7--46.4)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

146

37.1

4.6

(28.1--46.1)

Clark County, Washington

128

41.3

4.9

(31.7--50.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

4

---

**

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

90

---

---

---

Thurston County, Washington

136

---

---

---

Range

24.8--51.6

Median

42.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

22.9--46.8

BRFSS Nationwide Median

38.8

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

61.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 14. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant) who reported self-blood glucose monitoring at least two times daily, by community --- United States Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

182

32.2

4.2

(23.9--40.5)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

179

41.3

4.8

(32.0--50.6)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

50

---§

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

46

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

57

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

82

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

174

34.7

4.7

(25.5--43.8)

Santa Clara County, California

190

28.9

4.1

(20.9--36.9)

Mesa County, Colorado

69

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

123

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

36

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

91

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

184

34.5

4.3

(26.0--43.0)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

200

31.4

4.5

(22.7--40.2)

DeKalb County, Georgia

250

38.0

3.9

(30.3--45.7)

New Orleans, Louisiana

156

---

---

---

Boston, Massachusetts

169

50.9

(40.5--61.3)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

106

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

138

---

---

---

Minneapolis, Minnesota

117

---

---

---

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

114

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

94

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

153

43.4

4.7

(34.3--52.6)

Chautauqua County, New York

184

42.3

4.5

(33.4--51.1)

Jefferson County, New York

173

44.1

4.6

(35.0--53.2)

Rockland County, New York

146

53.3

5.0

(43.4--63.1)

Cleveland, Ohio

200

49.5

4.4

(40.9--58.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

415

43.2

4.2

(35.0--51.4)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

187

42.0

4.8

(32.6--51.5)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

224

45.2

3.9

(37.6--52.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

250

44.7

3.7

(37.6--51.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

167

38.3

4.9

(28.6--47.9)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

165

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

310

39.5

3.5

(32.5--46.4)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

142

41.4

5.0

(31.6--51.3)

Clark County, Washington

179

45.3

4.4

(36.6--53.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

5

---

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

154

40.6

4.7

(31.3--49.8)

Thurston County, Washington

184

39.2

4.3

(30.7--47.6)

Range

28.9--53.3

Median

41.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

9.3--46.8

BRFSS Nationwide Median

38.6

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

61.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 15. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant, refusals, and unknowns) who reported checking their feet at least one time daily for any sores or irritations, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

119

---§

---

---

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

143

76.8

4.3

(68.5--85.2)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

52

---

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

40

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

60

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

139

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

Mesa County, Colorado

89

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

111

66.6

4.8

(57.2--76.1)

Teller County, Colorado

27

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

72

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

181

74.2

3.8

(66.7--81.7)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

168

65.2

4.2

(57.1--73.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

318

74.5

3.5

(67.5--81.3)

Boston, Massachusetts

196

70.7

**

(63.3--78.1)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

114

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

127

66.1

5.0

(56.3--75.9)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

117

57.5

5.1

(47.6--67.5)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

103

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

92

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

145

72.6

4.1

(64.6--80.5)

Chautauqua County, New York

154

76.6

3.8

(69.2--83.9)

Jefferson County, New York

159

---

---

---

Rockland County, New York

126

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

204

68.5

4.6

(59.6--77.4)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

546

75.0

3.7

(67.7--82.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

195

80.4

3.3

(74.0--86.8)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

322

65.7

3.1

(59.6--71.9)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

271

69.3

3.2

(63.1--75.5)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

156

63.8

4.4

(55.2--72.3)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

141

88.0

3.3

(81.6--94.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

306

73.8

3.3

(67.3--80.2)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

142

---

---

---

Clark County, Washington

129

66.3

4.7

(57.0--75.5)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

4

---

---

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

87

---

---

---

Thurston County, Washington

130

60.5

5.0

(50.6--70.3)

Range

53.1--88.0

Median

70

BRFSS Nationwide Range

55.2--82.0

BRFSS Nationwide Median

68.8

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.


TABLE 16. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years ever told by a doctor that they had diabetes (excluding women who were told only when pregnant, refusals, and unknowns) who reported checking their feet at least one time daily for any sores or irritations, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

177

66.7

4.7

(57.4--75.9)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

176

77.3

5.0

(67.6--87.0)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

48

---§

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

48

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

60

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

75

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

175

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

Mesa County, Colorado

69

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

122

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

34

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

89

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

181

67.1

4.6

(58.0--76.1)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

193

69.7

4.4

(61.0--78.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

247

68.6

4.2

(60.4--76.8)

New Orleans, Louisiana

153

64.7

5.1

(54.8--74.6)

Boston, Massachusetts

108

65.4

**

(55.7--75.1)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

104

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

136

69.8

4.9

(60.2--79.4)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

112

---

---

---

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

108

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

89

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

153

68.4

4.3

(60.0--76.9)

Chautauqua County, New York

183

59.5

4.6

(50.6--68.5)

Jefferson County, New York

170

59.2

4.9

(49.7--68.8)

Rockland County, New York

144

62.7

4.8

(53.3--72.1)

Cleveland, Ohio

194

71.9

3.8

(64.5--79.3)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

413

80.6

2.6

(75.4--85.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

186

---

---

---

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

214

73.0

3.6

(66.0--80.1)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

243

71.1

3.4

(64.6--77.7)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

162

68.5

4.2

(60.3--76.7)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

162

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

309

78.4

3.0

(72.5--84.2)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

147

67.9

4.7

(58.7--77.1)

Clark County, Washington

179

69.2

3.9

(61.5--76.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

5

---

**

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

147

61.8

4.9

(52.2--71.5)

Thurston County, Washington

174

64.4

4.8

(55.0--73.8)

Range

59.2--80.6

Median

68.5

BRFSS Nationwide Range

54.6--80.1

BRFSS Nationwide Median

69.1

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.


TABLE 17. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported being told by health professional that they had asthma, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,024

12.8

1.3

(10.1--15.4)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,115

9.2

1.0

(7.2--11.2)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

608

12.8

1.6

(9.7--15.9)

Cochise County, Arizona

493

14.6

1.9

(10.8--18.4)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

6.5

1.7

(3.2--9.8)

Yuma County, Arizona

520

14.4

2.0

(10.5--18.3)

Salinas County, California

1,639

10.1

0.9

(8.3--12.0)

Santa Clara County, California

1,484

14.5

1.2

(12.3--16.8)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,083

14.3

1.4

(11.6--17.0)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,080

14.5

1.3

(11.9--17.0)

Teller County, Colorado

580

12.7

1.5

(9.7--15.7)

Weld County, Colorado

1,070

11.8

1.2

(9.5--14.1)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,553

13.8

1.1

(11.6--16.0)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,661

13.2

1.0

(11.1--15.2)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,762

12.6

0.9

(10.8--14.4)

Boston, Massachusetts

§

§

§

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

568

15.2

2.0

(11.3--19.2)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,743

13.1

1.0

(11.2--15.0)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,598

11.9

1.0

(9.9--13.8)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,504

11.1

1.1

(9.0--13.2)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,200

9.8

1.1

(7.6--11.9)

Broome County, New York

1,485

15.4

1.3

(13.0--17.9)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,491

14.9

1.3

(12.3--17.5)

Jefferson County, New York

1,516

11.4

1.0

(9.4--13.3)

Rockland County, New York

1,485

13.4

1.1

(11.2--15.6)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,498

14.3

1.1

(12.1--16.5)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,487

17.1

1.5

(14.1--20.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,524

18.9

1.5

(16.0--21.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

2,707

11.3

0.7

(9.9--12.7)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,701

10.5

0.7

(9.1--11.8)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,496

13.3

1.2

(11.0--15.5)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,571

12.3

1.4

(9.5--15.1)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,686

10.5

1.1

(8.3--12.6)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,544

14.9

1.2

(12.6--17.2)

Clark County, Washington

1,520

14.0

1.1

(11.9--16.1)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

§

§

§

§

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,062

12.8

1.2

(10.5--15.0)

Thurston County, Washington

1,582

15.3

1.1

(13.1--17.6)

Range

6.5--18.9

Median

13.1

BRFSS Nationwide Range

9.4--18.8

BRFSS Nationwide Median

13.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.


TABLE 18. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported being told by health professional that they had asthma, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,395

11.7

1.2

(9.3--14.0)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,154

11.7

1.4

(9.0--14.3)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

601

11.5

1.6

(8.4--14.6)

Cochise County, Arizona

462

13.4

1.9

(9.6--17.2)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

544

7.5

1.4

(4.7--10.2)

Yuma County, Arizona

580

10.9

1.5

(8.1--13.8)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,674

8.3

0.8

(6.7--9.9)

Santa Clara County, California

1,571

13.9

1.2

(11.5--16.3)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,067

15.8

1.5

(12.8--18.8)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,076

15.0

1.6

(12.0--18.0)

Teller County, Colorado

588

13.5

1.6

(10.4--16.5)

Weld County, Colorado

1,055

15.4

1.6

(12.3--18.6)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,520

14.2

1.4

(11.5--16.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,594

12.5

1.4

(9.9--15.1)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,352

11.8

0.9

(10.0--13.5)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,502

9.3

1.0

(7.3--11.2)

Boston, Massachusetts

§

§

§

§

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

577

17.1

2.7

(11.9--22.3)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,531

12.6

1.3

(10.0--15.2)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,559

11.6

1.3

(9.1--14.1)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,583

9.9

1.1

(7.9--12.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

999

9.9

1.2

(7.6--12.2)

Broome County, New York

1,471

13.1

1.4

(10.5--15.8)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,492

15.8

1.4

(13.2--18.5)

Jefferson County, New York

1,490

13.6

1.2

(11.2--16.1)

Rockland County, New York

1,494

10.4

0.9

(8.6--12.2)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,253

18.9

1.4

(16.1--21.7)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,932

15.0

1.4

(12.2--17.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,479

16.4

1.4

(13.7--19.0)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,813

11.3

0.9

(9.6--13.0)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,392

10.7

0.8

(9.2--12.2)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,525

13.4

1.1

(11.3--15.5)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,535

11.7

1.4

(8.9--14.4)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,547

11.4

1.1

(9.2--13.6)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,595

13.0

1.1

(10.8--15.1)

Clark County, Washington

1,674

15.1

1.1

(12.9--17.3)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

§

§

§

§

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,477

12.9

1.1

(10.8--15.0)

Thurston County, Washington

1,938

15.6

1.1

(13.4--17.7)

Range

7.5--18.9

Median

12.9

BRFSS Nationwide Range

9.7--15.8

BRFSS Nationwide Median

13.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.


TABLE 19. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years with asthma who reported having no symptoms of asthma during the preceding 30 days, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

§

§

§

§

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

§

§

§

§

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

47

Cochise County, Arizona

§

---

§

§

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

§

§

§

§

Yuma County, Arizona

§

§

§

§

Salinas County, California

92

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

§

§

§

§

Mesa County, Colorado

92

---

---

---

Pueblo County, Colorado

95

---

---

---

Teller County, Colorado

41

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

80

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

124

25.6

4.4

(17.0--34.1)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

134

---

---

---

DeKalb County, Georgia

§

§

§

§

Boston, Massachusetts

§

§

§

§

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

66

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

§

§

§

§

Minneapolis, Minnesota

§

§

§

§

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

§

§

§

§

Willmar, Minnesota

§

§

§

§

Broome County, New York

163

---

---

---

Chautauqua County, New York

129

---

---

---

Jefferson County, New York

145

29.5

4.4

(20.8--38.1)

Rockland County, New York

110

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

176

25.8

4.1

(17.8--33.8)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

375

11.5

2.6

(6.4--16.6)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Austin-Travis County, Texas

130

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

141

19.4

3.9

(11.9--27.0)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

§

§

§

§

Clark County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

§

§

§

§

Seattle-King County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Thurston County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Range

11.5--29.5

Median

25.6

BRFSS Nationwide Range

21.7--34.4

BRFSS Nationwide Median

26.2

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.


TABLE 20. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years with asthma who reported having no symptoms of asthma during the preceding 30 days, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

100

21.4

5.0

(11.7--31.1)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

86

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

Cochise County, Arizona

49

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

25

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

52

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

107

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

117

---

---

---

Mesa County, Colorado

85

11.0

3.5

(4.1--17.8)

Pueblo County, Colorado

96

17.6

4.7

(8.3--26.8)

Teller County, Colorado

53

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

86

---

---

---

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

116

---

---

---

DeKalb County, Georgia

181

36.1

4.8

(26.7--45.4)

New Orleans, Louisiana

79

---

---

---

Boston, Massachusetts

186

32.0

**

(21.3--42.7)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

64

---

---

---

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

105

---

---

---

Minneapolis, Minnesota

109

---

---

---

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

102

---

---

---

Willmar, Minnesota

74

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

137

17.3

3.7

(11.3--25.7)

Chautauqua County, New York

158

---

---

---

Jefferson County, New York

126

---

---

---

Rockland County, New York

104

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

180

26.5

4.1

(18.5--34.6)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

270

10.3

2.8

(4.8--15.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

161

---

---

---

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

149

21.9

4.3

(13.5--30.3)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

181

26.5

4.3

(18.2--34.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

156

21.6

3.8

(14.1--29.0)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

123

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

117

---

---

---

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

Clark County, Washington

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

**

Seattle-King County, Washington

88

17.2

4.5

(8.3--26.1)

Thurston County, Washington

Range

10.3--36.1

Median

21.5

BRFSS Nationwide Range

21.9--34.3

BRFSS Nationwide Median

27.1

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

** Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.


TABLE 21. Estimated prevalence of number of adults aged ≥18 years who reported moderate physical activity for ≥30 minutes at least five times a week or who reported vigorous physical activity for ≥20 minutes at least three times a week, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

§

§

§

§

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

§

§

§

§

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

583

59.9

2.4

(55.2--64.7)

Cochise County, Arizona

430

55.6

3.2

(49.4--61.8)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

431

51.4

3.1

(45.2--57.6)

Yuma County, Arizona

432

52.1

3.0

(46.2--58.0)

Salinas County, California

§

§

§

§

Santa Clara County, California

1,426

47.1

1.8

(43.7--50.6)

Mesa County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Pueblo County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Teller County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Weld County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,446

43.7

1.7

(40.4--47.0)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,535

46.7

1.6

(43.7--49.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,477

51.0

1.3

(48.4--53.6)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,572

57

(53.3--60.7)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

393

52.6

3.9

(45.0--60.1)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,659

57.5

1.5

(54.5--60.4)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,522

55.2

1.5

(52.2--58.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,442

58.0

1.6

(54.8--61.2)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,131

49.4

1.9

(45.7--53.1)

Broome County, New York

1,416

51.9

1.8

(48.4--55.4)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,389

54.8

1.8

(51.4--58.2)

Jefferson County, New York

1,445

58.5

1.9

(54.8--62.1)

Rockland County, New York

1,407

52.2

1.7

(48.9--55.5)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,423

52.2

1.8

(48.7--55.7)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,770

42.3

2.5

(37.5--47.1)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,469

54.7

2.5

(49.8--59.6)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,572

54.2

1.7

(50.9--57.5)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

§

§

§

§

Clark County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

§

§

§

§

Seattle-King County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Thurston County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Range

42.3--59.9

Median

52.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

**

BRFSS Nationwide Median

**

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

50.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if the optional module questions for certain sectors are not used on even years.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 22. Estimated prevalence of number of adults aged ≥18 years who reported moderate physical activity for ≥30 minutes at least five times a week or who reported vigorous physical activity for ≥20 minutes at least three times a week, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,309

44.2

1.9

(40.4--48.0)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,063

40.6

2.2

(36.3--44.8)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

578

64.7

2.4

(60.0--69.5)

Cochise County, Arizona

427

51.1

3.3

(44.6--57.6)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

498

56.2

2.9

(50.5--61.9)

Yuma County, Arizona

528

53.8

2.8

(48.4--59.2)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,529

58.0

1.8

(54.5--61.5)

Santa Clara County, California

432

52.1

3.0

(46.2--58.0)

Mesa County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Pueblo County, Colorado

960

53.6

2.1

(49.5--57.6)

Teller County, Colorado

541

59.7

2.4

(54.9--64.5)

Weld County, Colorado

949

51.0

2.1

(46.8--55.2)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,409

46.9

1.9

(43.1--50.6)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,468

45.4

2

(41.6--49.2)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,129

47.6

1.6

(44.5--50.7)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,397

46.5

2

(42.6--50.3)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,558

52.8

(49.0--56.6)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

406

69.8

3.8

(62.4--77.2)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,443

56.1

1.9

(52.4--59.8)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,477

59.8

2.0

(56.0--63.7)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,521

55.5

2.0

(51.6--59.5)

Willmar, Minnesota

934

52.8

2.3

(48.4--57.3)

Broome County, New York

1,386

48.7

1.9

(45.0--52.3)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,391

54.5

1.8

(50.9--58.1)

Jefferson County, New York

1,402

61.5

1.7

(58.2--64.9)

Rockland County, New York

1,420

47.9

1.8

(44.4--51.4)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,189

50.5

1.9

(46.8--54.1)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,851

48.2

1.8

(44.7--51.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,320

45.2

1.9

(41.5--48.9)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,661

50.5

1.5

(47.6--53.4)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,182

47.9

1.3

(45.4--50.5)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,395

49.5

1.7

(46.1--52.9)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,441

55.6

2.4

(51.0--60.3)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,422

51.2

1.9

(47.5--54.8)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,494

51.5

1.7

(48.0--54.9)

Clark County, Washington

1,575

54.6

1.7

(51.4--57.9)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

36

---**

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,409

50.1

1.7

(46.8--53.4)

Thurston County, Washington

1,841

56.4

1.5

(53.5--59.3)

Range

40.6--69.8

Median

51.5

BRFSS Nationwide range

30.9--60.8

BRFSS Nationwide median

49.2

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

50.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if community did not measure this indicator in 2007.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 23. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported eating at least five fruits and vegetables/day, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

§

§

§

§

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

§

§

§

§

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

610

19.0

1.9

(15.4--22.7)

Cochise County, Arizona

463

28.5

2.7

(23.2--33.8)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

449

28.7

2.8

(23.2--34.1)

Yuma County, Arizona

454

24.7

2.4

(20.1--29.3)

Salinas County, California

§

§

§

§

Santa Clara County, California

1,483

26.8

1.5

(23.9--29.7)

Mesa County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Pueblo County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Teller County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Weld County, Colorado

§

§

§

§

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,489

23.7

1.3

(21.0--26.3)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,589

26.1

1.3

(23.5--28.6)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,688

28.8

1.2

(26.5--31.1)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,664

26.7

(23.5--29.9)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

567

11.1

1.6

(8.0--14.2)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,728

30.2

1.3

(27.6--32.8)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,594

28.9

1.3

(26.3--31.4)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,499

29.8

1.4

(27.0--32.6)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,189

22.6

1.4

(19.8--25.4)

Broome County, New York

1,491

27.8

1.6

(24.8--30.8)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,494

25.5

1.5

(22.5--28.4)

Jefferson County, New York

1,517

25.1

1.5

(22.2--28.1)

Rockland County, New York

1,485

27.2

1.4

(24.5--30.0)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,499

21.8

1.4

(19.1--24.5)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,495

13.7

1.3

(11.1--16.2)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

§

§

§

§

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,528

28.8

2.4

(24.1--33.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,637

25.9

1.4

(23.1--28.6)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

§

§

§

§

Clark County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

§

§

§

§

Seattle-King County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Thurston County, Washington

§

§

§

§

Range

11.1--30.2

Median

26.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

**

BRFSS Nationwide Median

**

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if the optional module questions for certain sectors are not used on even years.


TABLE 24. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported eating at least five fruits and vegetables/day, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,375

23.8

1.5

(20.8--26.8)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,127

17.9

1.5

(15.0--20.8)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

604

22.3

2.2

(18.0--26.6)

Cochise County, Arizona

452

27.3

2.9

(21.6--33.1)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

532

24.0

2.2

(19.7--28.2)

Yuma County, Arizona

563

28.8

2.5

(23.9--33.8)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,674

37.6

1.7

(34.3--40.9)

Santa Clara County, California

§

§

§

§

Mesa County, Colorado

1,033

25.2

1.6

(22.1--28.3)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,032

21.7

1.7

(18.4--25.0)

Teller County, Colorado

569

25.3

2.1

(21.2--29.4)

Weld County, Colorado

1,013

25.6

1.8

(22.1--29.1)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,468

29.6

1.7

(26.2--32.9)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,532

28.4

1.7

(25.1--31.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,250

30.9

1.4

(28.2--33.6)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,471

25.0

1.6

(22.0--28.1)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,601

26.6

(23.2--30.0)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

578

21.4

3.0

(15.5--27.2)

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,522

29.5

1.7

(26.2--32.8)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,549

30.5

1.7

(27.1--33.9)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,580

34.6

1.7

(31.3--38.0)

Willmar, Minnesota

993

28.0

2.0

(24.0--31.9)

Broome County, New York

1,473

28.3

1.5

(25.3--31.3)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,494

27.3

1.6

(24.2--30.4)

Jefferson County, New York

1,491

28.6

1.6

(25.5--31.8)

Rockland County, New York

1,496

28.0

1.4

(25.2--30.7)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,258

29.2

1.6

(26.1--32.4)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,934

14.6

1.2

(12.3--16.9)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,425

26.9

1.6

(23.8--30.1)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,773

20.4

1.1

(18.3--22.5)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,335

21.6

1.0

(19.7--23.6)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,497

24.5

1.4

(21.9--27.2)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,493

26.7

2.2

(22.5--30.9)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,479

24.1

1.5

(21.2--27.0)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,582

22.2

1.4

(19.6--24.9)

Clark County, Washington

1,664

26.2

1.4

(23.4--29.0)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

38

**

**

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,470

24.3

1.3

(21.8--26.9)

Thurston County, Washington

1,925

26.4

1.3

(23.9--28.9)

Range

14.6--37.6

Median

26.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

13.7--32.5

BRFSS Nationwide Median

24.3

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if the optional module questions for certain sectors are not used on even years.


TABLE 25. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported having smoked ≥100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who are current smokers on every day or certain days, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,019

19.0

1.7

(15.7--22.3)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,114

19.3

1.8

(15.8--22.8)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

609

35.6

2.5

(30.8--40.5)

Cochise County, Arizona

487

19.6

2.5

(14.7--24.4)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

495

18.1

2.5

(13.3--22.9)

Yuma County, Arizona

520

13.5

1.9

(9.8--17.2)

Salinas County, California

1,639

15.4

1.2

(12.9--17.8)

Santa Clara County, California

1,480

14.2

1.4

(11.4--16.9)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,080

21.8

1.6

(18.7--24.9)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,076

21.8

1.6

(18.8--24.8)

Teller County, Colorado

579

23.3

2.4

(18.6--28.0)

Weld County, Colorado

1,069

18.1

1.5

(15.3--20.9)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,551

22.0

1.4

(19.4--24.7)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,656

24.1

1.3

(21.6--26.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

3,756

13.4

0.9

(11.7--15.2)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,660

17.3

§

(14.6--19.9)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,739

18.2

1.2

(15.8--20.6)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,599

17.1

1.1

(15.0--19.3)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,503

12.5

1.1

(10.4--14.7)

Willmar, Minnesota

1,202

16.3

1.5

(13.4--19.2)

Broome County, New York

1,484

24.8

1.6

(21.7--27.9)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,494

22.9

1.5

(20.0--25.8)

Jefferson County, New York

1,515

24.3

1.8

(20.8--27.7)

Rockland County, New York

1,484

13.5

1.2

(11.2--15.8)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,493

31.5

1.7

(28.3--34.8)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

4,489

31.4

1.8

(27.9--34.8)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,518

24.3

1.5

(21.5--27.2)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

2,707

26.2

1.0

(24.2--28.2)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,704

26.0

1.0

(24.0--28.0)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,496

23.7

1.5

(20.9--26.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,566

17.0

1.7

(13.8--20.2)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,680

21.2

1.4

(18.4--23.9)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,534

18.0

1.4

(15.3--20.8)

Clark County, Washington

1,518

17.7

1.2

(15.2--20.1)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

36

48.0

§

(27.0--69.6)

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,056

16.4

1.4

(13.6--19.1)

Thurston County, Washington

1,579

20.8

1.4

(18.1--23.4)

Range

12.5--48.0

Median

19.6

BRFSS Nationwide Range

08.9--28.5

BRFSS Nationwide Median

20.1

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective**

12.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

** The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 26. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported having smoked ≥100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who are current smokers on every day or certain days, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

1,389

21.6

1.6

(18.5--24.7)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

1,151

21.9

2.0

(18.0--25.8)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

600

28.3

2.5

(23.3--33.2)

Cochise County, Arizona

463

24.2

3.1

(18.2--30.3)

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

546

21.2

2.5

(16.3--26.1)

Yuma County, Arizona

576

15.2

2.2

(10.9--19.5)

Salinas-Monterey County, California

1,674

12.5

1.2

(10.1--15.0)

Santa Clara County, California

1,566

13.2

1.3

(10.7--15.7)

Mesa County, Colorado

1,068

26.0

1.8

(22.5--29.5)

Pueblo County, Colorado

1,075

23.5

1.8

(20.0--26.9)

Teller County, Colorado

584

21.1

2.1

(16.9--25.2)

Weld County, Colorado

1,055

17.8

1.5

(14.9--20.7)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

1,513

23.4

1.7

(20.0--26.8)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

1,594

24.4

1.7

(21.1--27.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

2,343

12.1

1.0

(10.1--14.1)

New Orleans, Louisiana

1,497

16.2

1.6

(13.1--19.4)

Boston, Massachusetts

1,601

17.9

§

(14.8--21.0)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,526

15.9

1.3

(13.3--18.6)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

1,559

17.8

1.7

(14.5--21.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

1,583

11.8

1.2

(9.4--14.1)

Willmar, Minnesota

997

14.2

1.6

(11.2--17.2)

Broome County, New York

1,467

21.5

1.5

(18.5--24.4)

Chautauqua County, New York

1,486

24.2

1.5

(21.2--27.2)

Jefferson County, New York

1,489

22.6

1.5

(19.6--25.6)

Rockland County, New York

1,491

11.2

1.1

(9.0--13.4)

Cleveland, Ohio

1,253

33.7

1.7

(30.3--37.0)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

2,931

29.1

1.6

(25.9--32.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,471

26.0

1.5

(22.9--29.0)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

1,811

27.1

1.3

(24.7--29.6)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

2,387

24.3

1.1

(22.2--26.4)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

1,520

21.7

1.5

(18.8--24.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

1,530

20.6

2.0

(16.6--24.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

1,539

20.3

1.6

(17.3--23.4)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

1,593

17.8

1.3

(15.2--20.4)

Clark County, Washington

1,667

17.2

1.3

(14.7--19.7)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

38

---**

§

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

1,473

15.9

1.2

(13.4--18.3)

Thurston County, Washington

1,933

17.5

1.2

(15.1--19.8)

Range

11.2--33.7

Median

21.1

BRFSS Nationwide range

8.7--31.0

BRFSS Nationwide median

19.7

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

12.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

** Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 27. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported having stopped smoking for ≥1 day because they were trying to quit smoking during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 38 Steps Communities, 2006

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

184

66.7

4.2

(58.4--75.0)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

204

---§

---

---

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

196

61.2

4.3

(52.9--69.6)

Cochise County, Arizona

89

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

80

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

74

---

---

---

Salinas County, California

210

55.2

4.5

(46.5--64.0)

Santa Clara County, California

182

---

---

---

Mesa County, Colorado

216

56.1

4.1

(48.0--64.2)

Pueblo County, Colorado

217

59.7

4.0

(51.8--67.5)

Teller County, Colorado

120

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

180

61.8

4.3

(53.3--70.3)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

338

55.3

3.4

(48.7--61.8)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

386

48.4

3.1

(42.2--54.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

473

58.5

3.6

(51.5--65.5)

Boston, Massachusetts

303

60.6

(52.2--69.0)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

**

**

**

**

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

293

57.1

3.6

(50.1--64.2)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

278

54.3

3.5

(47.4--61.2)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

184

52.4

4.7

(43.1--61.6)

Willmar, Minnesota

178

57.4

4.9

(47.7--67.1)

Broome County, New York

319

57.6

3.6

(50.5--64.7)

Chautauqua County, New York

290

54.8

3.7

(47.5--62.0)

Jefferson County, New York

303

58.9

4.1

(50.8--67.0)

Rockland County, New York

185

52.5

4.6

(43.4--61.6)

Cleveland, Ohio

425

58.6

3.2

(52.2--64.9)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

1,062

58.8

3.3

(52.4--65.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

380

65.3

3.3

(58.9--71.7)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

668

52.1

2.3

(47.5--56.6)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

656

54.3

2.4

(49.7--58.9)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

314

60.0

3.4

(53.3--66.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

261

67.9

4.4

(59.3--76.5)

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

317

58.6

3.7

(51.5--65.8)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

260

58.4

4.2

(50.2--66.7)

Clark County, Washington

240

61.1

3.7

(53.8--68.4)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

15

61.9

(30.4--85.8)

Seattle-King County, Washington

159

53.0

4.7

(43.8--62.2)

Thurston County, Washington

278

58.3

3.7

(51.1--65.6)

Range

48.4--67.9

Median

58.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

48.3--68.0

BRFSS Nationwide Median

57.4

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

80.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10."

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if the community did not measure this indicator.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


TABLE 28. Estimated prevalence of respondents aged ≥18 years who reported having stopped smoking for ≥1 day because they were trying to quit smoking during the preceding 12 months, by community --- United States, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 39 Steps Communities, 2007

Community

Sample size

Weighted %

SE*

(95% CI)

River Region, Alabama

265

58.5

4.2

(50.2--66.8)

Southeast Alabama, Alabama

199

65.3

5.1

(55.3--75.2)

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Alaska

152

---§

---

---

Cochise County, Arizona

91

---

---

---

Santa Cruz County, Arizona

101

---

---

---

Yuma County, Arizona

85

---

---

---

Salinas-Monterey County, California

187

---

---

---

Santa Clara County, California

183

---

---

---

Mesa County, Colorado

223

53.3

4.1

(45.2--61.4)

Pueblo County, Colorado

233

69.6

3.8

(62.2--77.1)

Teller County, Colorado

114

---

---

---

Weld County, Colorado

190

50.8

4.6

(41.8--59.8)

Tampa-Hillsborough, Florida

307

53.8

4.3

(45.3--62.2)

St. Petersburg-Pinellas County, Florida

369

53.8

4.0

(45.9--61.7)

DeKalb County, Georgia

263

56.7

4.5

(48.0--65.4)

New Orleans, Louisiana

225

---

---

---

Boston, Massachusetts

280

55.7

(46.1--65.3)

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Michigan

**

**

**

**

St. Paul-Ramsey County, Minnesota

238

55.7

4.6

(46.8--64.7)

Minneapolis, Minnesota

250

63.1

4.8

(53.7--72.4)

Rochester-Olmstead County, Minnesota

170

65.5

4.2

(57.2--73.8)

Willmar, Minnesota

129

---

---

---

Broome County, New York

285

52.7

4.0

(44.9--60.5)

Chautauqua County, New York

308

50.8

3.8

(43.4--58.2)

Jefferson County, New York

297

51.5

4.0

(43.7--59.2)

Rockland County, New York

158

---

---

---

Cleveland, Ohio

400

62.0

3.0

(56.1--68.0)

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

703

53.9

3.5

(47.0--60.8)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

378

67.8

3.2

(61.6--74.0)

Fayette County, Pennsylvania

470

54.0

2.8

(48.6--59.3)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

571

57.4

2.5

(52.4--62.3)

Tioga County, Pennsylvania

287

57.0

3.9

(49.4--64.6)

Austin-Travis County, Texas

269

---

---

---

San Antonio-Bexar County, Texas

260

53.9

4.4

(45.4--62.5)

Chelan-Douglas-Okanogan Counties, Washington

266

51.0

4.2

(42.7--59.2)

Clark County, Washington

252

60.5

4.0

(52.7--68.3)

Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington

16

---

---

Seattle-King County, Washington

226

55.1

4.3

(46.7--63.5)

Thurston County, Washington

290

53.7

3.8

(46.1--61.2)

Range

50.8--69.6

Median

55.4

BRFSS Nationwide Range

49.5--65.2

BRFSS Nationwide Median

57.6

Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objective††

80.0

* Standard error.

Confidence interval.

§ Not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the CI half width is >10.

Data analysis conducted by the community; SE not reported.

** Not available if community did not measure this indicator.

†† The HP 2010 objective refers to adults aged ≥20 years whereas Steps data are collected for adults aged ≥18 years.


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