Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

	Countries Where CDC Works

  
	child with nurse for global HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

CDC leverages its core strengths to advance four overarching global health goals:
1) improving the health and well-being of people around the world,
2) improving capabilities for preparing for and responding to infectious diseases and emerging health threats,
3) building country public health capacity, and
4) maximizing organizational capacity.
 

To learn more about these goals and our vision, see our global strategy(http://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/strategy/default.htm).

 

The most effective and least expensive way to protect Americans from diseases and other health threats that begin overseas is to stop them before they spread to our shores. CDC works 24/7 to protect the American people from disease both in the U.S. and overseas. CDC detects and controls outbreaks at their source, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. In addition, fighting diseases like HIV/AIDS, malaria, and TB help reduce poverty and strengthen political stability in developing countries.

	CDC Roybal Campus Atlanta, GA

For more than 60 years, CDC has used its scientific expertise to help people throughout the world live healthier, safer, longer lives. CDC's Center for Global Health coordinates and manages the agency's resources and expertise to address global challenges such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, emergency and refugee health, non-communicable diseases, injuries, and more.

Making a Difference

Blog

	Blog of the week
Facebook Live from AIDS 2016

AIDS.gov will be using Facebook Live at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, South Africa to reach an even wider audience. They’ll be able to show in real time, daily interviews with senior government officials who will share the latest research and news...
Posted July 15, 2016

Video

Addressing the needs of women and girls: Olive Shisana

Big Questions to Drive Action: How do we meaningfully address some of the gender norms that place women and girls at increased risk of HIV? Olive Shisana, AIDS 2016 Co-Chair shares her answer. On the road to Durban, we went out and asked experts and health leaders the guiding questions to drive meaningful action at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016).

Story

	Story of the week
International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference

Leaders from CDC’s Division of Global HIV & TB are participating the 21st annual International AIDS Conference being held in Durban, South Africa from July 18-22, 2016...

Infographic

CDC Zika Updates

	Zika Outbreak World Map

Latest Outbreak Info

On January 22, 2016, CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to respond to outbreaks of Zika occurring in the Americas and increased reports of birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome in areas affected by Zika. On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) because of clusters of microcephaly and other neurological disorders in some areas affected by Zika. On February 8, 2016, CDC elevated its EOC activation to a Level 1, the highest level.

CDC is working with international public health partners and with state and local health departments to

  • Alert healthcare providers and the public about Zika.
  • Post travel notices and other travel-related guidance.
  • Provide state health laboratories with diagnostic tests.
  • Detect and report cases, which will help prevent further spread.
  • Page last reviewed: July 18, 2016
  • Page last updated: July 18, 2016
  • Content source: Global Health
    Notice: Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS, CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.
Top