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What CDC Is Doing About Lung Cancer

CDC's ongoing work to encourage the prevention and control of lung cancer includes—

National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR). CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) and the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, in collaboration with the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, produce the annual United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) Web-based report. CDC's National Center for Health Statistics/National Vital Statistics System provides nationwide cancer death statistics.

Office on Smoking and Health (OSH). CDC's OSH created the National Tobacco Control Program in 1999 to reduce tobacco-related diseases through community interventions, counter-marketing, program policy and regulation, surveillance, and evaluation. The program provides funding and technical support to state and territorial health departments.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). CDC's NIOSH is the federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness, including lung cancer caused by workplace exposures.

National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). ATSDR and CDC's NCEH support environmental health tracking programs and conduct activities to prevent or control exposures and diseases related to the environment. For lung cancer, examples include exposures to asbestos or radon at home or at work.

Guide to Community Preventive Services. CDC supports the Guide to Community Preventive Services, a Web site that recommends ways to improve tobacco control at the community level. The Guide also offers evidence-based recommendations about other disease prevention and health promotion programs.

Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. CDC contributes to Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T., a Web site that offers research-tested tools and programs for tobacco control, as well as many other resources for the prevention and control of cancer.

National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. CDC established the NCCCP in 1998 and funds state, tribal, local, and territorial comprehensive cancer control programs that facilitate the pooling of cancer resources to address top-priority cancers, including lung cancer.

1-800-QUITNOW. CDC and NCI support a national network of "quitlines" that smokers in the United States can use for help with quitting smoking. 1-800-QUITNOW (1-800-784-8669) is a single-access point to the National Network of Tobacco Cessation Quitlines. Callers are routed automatically to a state-run quitline if one exists in their area. If there is no state-run quitline, the call goes to the NCI quitline.

 
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