The Epidemiology and Clinical Presentation of Lassa Fever: Information for Medical Providers

Learn to Identify Lassa Fever

While viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs), like Lassa fever, are very serious, they are not common in the U.S. However, it is important for healthcare providers to understand high consequence viruses, like Lassa fever, so they can appropriately diagnose and care for their patients. This video, the first in a two-part training series on Lassa fever, provides an overview, describing the epidemiology and clinical presentation of the virus.

What you will learn

By the end of this training, you will be able to:

  • Describe at least two risk factors of Lassa fever.
  • Name at least two countries where Lassa fever is endemic.
  • Describe at least five signs or symptoms of Lassa fever.
  • Describe the implications of Lassa fever infection on pregnant women.
  • Describe the clinical syndrome associated with Lassa fever in children.
  • Describe my role, responsibilities, and scope of practice as a team member when diagnosing Lassa fever.
Free Continuing Education Credit

To receive continuing education (CE) from TCEO for the Hantavirus Disease: Information for Medical Providers training complete the following—

  1. Visit TCEO and follow these steps before February 1, 2021.
  2. Complete the pre-test on lassa virus.
  3. Complete the training.
  4. Complete the Evaluation and pass the posttest at 100%.
After Registering for the CE Credit Take the Required Pre-test
Training Video—The Epidemiology and Clinical Presentation of Lassa Fever: Information for Medical Providers
Accreditation Statements:

CME: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME®) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CNE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

This activity provides 0.2 contact hours.

DISCLOSURE: In compliance with continuing education requirements, all presenters must disclose any financial or other associations with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters as well as any use of unlabeled product(s) or product(s) under investigational use.

CDC, our planners, content experts, and their spouses/partners wish to disclose they have no financial interests or other relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters. Planners have reviewed content to ensure there is no bias.

Content will not include any discussion of the unlabeled use of a product or a product under investigational use.

CDC did not accept commercial support for this continuing education activity.