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2.         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2008. Recommendations for partner services programs for HIV infection, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, and Chlamydial infection. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; 57, no. RR-9:1-63.

3.         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Improving Sexually Transmitted Disease Programs through Assessment, Assurance, Policy Development, and Prevention Strategies (STD AAPPS). Atlanta, Georgia: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/std/foa/aapps/PS14-1402-FOA-Amendment-I-Final_07-08-13.pdfCdc-pdf

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25.       Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2004. Using the internet for partner notification of sexually transmitted diseases – Los Angeles County, California, 2003. MMWR. 53(6):129-131.

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34.       Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Program Operations Guidelines for STD Prevention: Partner Services. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/std/program/partners.pdfCdc-pdf

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