Learn About How COVID-19 Impacts Those With Viral Hepatitis
New CDC Vital Signs Report

A new report finds that large gaps in hepatitis C treatment persist nearly a decade after a highly effective cure was approved. Learn how reducing barriers can increase hepatitis C treatment and save lives.

Hepatitis C Information

Hepatitis C - Illustration depicting a transparent human body with the liver highlighted

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is spread through contact with blood from an infected person. Today, most people become infected with the hepatitis C virus by sharing needles or other equipment used to prepare and inject drugs. For some people, hepatitis C is a short-term illness, but for more than half of people who become infected with the hepatitis C virus, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis C can result in serious, even life-threatening health problems like cirrhosis and liver cancer. People with chronic hepatitis C can often have no symptoms and don’t feel sick. When symptoms appear, they often are a sign of advanced liver disease. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C. The best way to prevent hepatitis C is by avoiding behaviors that can spread the disease, especially injecting drugs. Getting tested for hepatitis C is important, because treatments can cure most people with hepatitis C in 8 to 12 weeks.