Prevention Guidelines

2020 ASM Guideline

On March 3, 2020, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) released a new guideline for detecting and identifying GBS. ASM’s guideline replaces the 2010 guidelines published by CDC. View ASM’s Interim Guideline for the Detection and Identification of Group B Streptococcusexternal icon.

In June 2019, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published a new Committee OpinionPrevention of Group B Streptococcal Early-Onset Disease in Newbornsexternal iconexternal icon—which all obstetric care providers should now be following. ACOG’s guidance replaces the 2010 guidelines published by CDC.

In July 2019, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a new clinical reportManagement of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Diseaseexternal iconexternal icon—which all neonatal providers should now be following. AAP’s Clinical Report replaces the 2010 guidelines published by CDC. Additionally, in late 2018, AAP released guidance that pertains to management of infants with suspected or proven early-onset sepsisexternal iconexternal icon.

In March 2020, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) published a new guidelineInterim Guideline for the Detection and Identification of Group B Streptococcusexternal icon—which all labs should now be following. ASM’s guideline replaces the 2010 guidelines published by CDC.

CDC, AAP, ACOG, ASM, the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and the American Academy of Family Physicians have worked together on GBS prevention for many years and new guidance represents both progress and continued collaboration between these groups. These organizations remain committed to working together to protect newborns from GBS. CDC will continue to stay engaged actively in evaluating guidelines implementation along with impact and trends in disease burden. CDC will also continue to build the evidence base relevant to maternal GBS vaccination.