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Keeping Children Safe

Two boys in school librarySchool is back in session. As you stock up on pencils, take first-day pictures, and adjust to new bus schedules, take a few, quick steps that can keep your child safer during an emergency.

January 15, 2015. A water main break near Atlanta, Georgia cuts off water pressure to 12 schools. With no water to drink or to use to flush toilets, some schools close early while others bus their students to nearby schools with working bathrooms. Parents rush to keep up with notifications on when and where to pick up their children. If this were to happen in your neighborhood, would you know what to do and where to go?

From tornadoes to water main breaks, emergencies can occur with little or no warning—even during the school day. As children head back to school, take a few steps to help protect your child from an emergency and to reunite with your child quickly and safely.

Infographic: Easy as ABC. Three steps to protect your child during emergencies in the school day. Ask how you would be reunited with your children in an emergency or evacuation. Bring extra medications, special food, or supplies your child would need if you were separated overnight. Complete a backpack card and tuck one in your child's backpack and your wallet.

Three steps to protect your child during emergencies in the school day.

Protecting your child is as easy as A-B-C

Ask how you would be reunited with your child in an emergency or evacuation

  • If students had to evacuate, where should you go to pick them up?
  • How would the school notify you in the event of emergency?

Bring extra medication, special foods, or supplies your child would need if you were separated overnight

  • What essential supplies would your child need if separated from you overnight? (Medications? Inhaler? Milk? Diapers? Battery pack for special equipment?)
  • Does the school have an emergency stockpile of these items or could you bring extras to be kept at school?
  • What is the school policy for how and when medicine can be administered to your child?

Complete a backpack contact information card [171 KB] and tuck one in your child's backpack and your wallet

  • Emergencies are chaotic! Make sure your child or their school knows how to reach you, and who should be called if your phone isn't working.
  • Download and complete your own backpack card.

Follow these A-B-C’s so that emergencies are less chaotic, children can be kept safe, and families can be reunited safely as soon as possible.

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