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Ebola Radio Health Messages in Local Languages

Click on a spot title to see transcript in English:

Spot 1. "It's probably malaria, not Ebola!"

One difficult thing about Ebola is that the signs – sudden fever, diarrhea, vomitting – these are shared by other diseases. So, perhaps it's not Ebola. It could be malaria. Or perhaps typhoid fever. So, it's quite difficult for anyone, except a health care worker, to say definitively 'Yes, it is Ebola,' or 'No, it is not Ebola.'

So, if you have sudden fever, diarrhoea or vomiting, you should go to the health centre, because, no matter the cause, you can receive help there.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Audio Message: Ebola Signs and Symptoms

It’s difficult to recognize Ebola because the signs, sudden fever, diarrhea, vomiting are shared by other diseases. It’s quite difficult for anyone, except a healthcare worker, to say definitively yes, it is Ebola, or no, it is not Ebola. So if you have sudden fever, diarrhea, or vomiting, and you have been in direct contact with someone who is sick, you should go to the health center, because no matter the cause, you can receive help there. And remember, with the right information and together with our healthcare workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 2. Where does Ebola live?

The Ebola virus lives in the bats and does not make them sick. The Ebola virus is released from the bats from time to time and can infect monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans, and other wild animals.

So, can Ebola be caused by witchcraft or a curse, or any other cause? No. Remember: the Ebola virus lives in bats.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 3. If there is no fever, there is no Ebola

If a person has no fever, he or she can move about, touch others, ride the bus, take a taxi. And they cannot pass Ebola to other people. A person who develops a fever, however, can pass Ebola to others. Once they have recovered and been discharged, they are free from Ebola, and should be welcomed back into the family and the community.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Audio Message: Travelers Message

Ebola virus disease or EVD, has been identified in several countries in west Africa, including Nigeria. The risk for travelers is low. To prevent the spread of Ebola, avoid contact with blood and body fluids. Avoid contact with a sick person, and wash hands often. And remember, with the right information and together with our healthcare workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 4. Who is at risk for Ebola?

Who is at risk of getting Ebola? It’s the people who are in contact with those who are sick from Ebola, including family members and health care workers. And also people who are in contact with wild animals, including bats and monkeys, or fruit partially eaten by bats (bat mot).

Do people have any risk of getting Ebola by riding the bus? No.
Do people have any risk of getting Ebola by wearing a helmet? No.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Audio Message: Messages to the Airport

Who is at risk of getting Ebola? It’s the people who are in physical contact with those who are sick from Ebola; including family members and health care workers. Do people have any risk of getting Ebola by riding on a plane? Ebola is not a contagious disease. It is transmitted through direct contact with the sick person’s bodily fluids. And remember, with the right information and together with our healthcare workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 5. Ebola transmission within the family

Many times, when a man becomes sick with Ebola, it is the woman who cares for him. And then what happens? Then, the woman becomes sick. And then who cares for the woman? The grand-mother or a family member.

Then, the children can become infected, as well as others having direct contact with the sick person.

This is how Ebola can pass from one person to another in the community.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 6. Ebola virus is very fragile and easily destroyed

Here is some good news about Ebola: although it is dangerous, Ebola virus is easily destroyed/(fragile).

Heat will destroy Ebola virus. Sunlight will destroy it. Light will destroy it. Bleach and laundry detergent will destroy it.

All these will kill Ebola virus.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

Spot 7. Stigmatisation

Many Ebola patients who are treated in hospital will survive and recover. Ebola is a serious disease, but when people have recovered, the doctors test them, and when the disease is all gone, they are discharged.

The discharged patients can not transmit Ebola. The virus has left their bodies, and they can not pass Ebola to anyone: not their children, their other family members, people sitting next to them in the taxi or bus. Partners, however, must abstain or always use a condom for sex for 3 months after discharge from the health centre.

And remember: with the right information, and together with our health care workers, we can protect ourselves from Ebola.

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