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No. 4, 2012

COMMUNICATIONS, EDUCATION, AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES BRANCH UPDATES

CDC Patient Education Brochure Available:
12-Dose Regimen for Latent TB Infection

The Communications, Education, and Behavioral Studies Branch (CEBSB) in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination (DTBE) at CDC developed a patient education brochure on the 12-dose treatment regimen for latent TB infection. This brochure was developed for clinicians to use with patients while discussing the 12-dose regimen. The brochure contains information on latent TB infection, the 12-dose regimen, treatment schedules, and adverse events. There is space on this brochure to write in treatment schedules and clinic/office contact information. The 12-Dose Regimen for Latent TB Infection-Patient Education Brochure (www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/pamphlets/12-doseregimen.htm) is available for download in two sizes: 

Reported by Molly Dowling, MPH, CHES
Div of TB Elimination

DTBE Team Builds the Best Scarecrow Ever …
and Provides TB Education

In August 2012, Dr. Wanda Walton, Chief of the Communications, Education, and Behavioral Studies Branch (CEBSB) in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination saw an e-mail from the Atlanta Botanical Garden announcing its upcoming annual competition, Scarecrows in the Garden. Dr. Walton, not one to turn down a chance for fun and creative group activities, sent her branch an e-mail asking: Do you all want to participate in this? The branch responded almost in unison, Yes! So the project was afoot.

CEBSB staff simply thought they had found another outlet for their boundless creativity. But they were actually doing what they have decades of combined experience in accomplishing: finding a new (and whimsical) way to communicate about tuberculosis.

After several creative ideas were proposed, “Scare-let Crow’Hara” was adopted. As the name implies, the general appearance was to be Scarlett O’Hara in the famous scene in Gone with the Wind in which, to pay the taxes and save Tara, she decides to visit Capt. Rhett Butler in Atlanta and ask for money. Wanting to look well-off, not needy, she resorts to a dress made from lovely green velvet drapes hanging in her home.

But, you may be asking, what does all this have to do with tuberculosis?  Well, indeed, the actress who played Scarlett O’Hara, Vivien Leigh, died in 1967 … of tuberculosis.

The final Scare-let Crow’Hara is a large, 6-foot-tall crow, wings and tail and all, in a green dress. Black feathers spill out from her really low-cut bodice, and hot pink lipstick adorns the end of her beak. One wing is bent at the “elbow” so she can hold her large bottle of TB pills; the bottle reads

TB Pills
Scaring away TB germs
so this frightful disease will be
gone with the wind.

Scare-let stands behind an eerily realistic looking tombstone that says,

Vivien Leigh
(alias Scarlett O’Hara)
Died of TB
1967

Cheryl Tryon, Health Education Specialist in CEBSB, provided overall guidance, instruction, and a serene “I actually know what I’m doing” attitude. She impressed the team by announcing that, whatever ideas we came up with or whatever challenges arose during the build process, she was certain that she could produce the appropriate tool needed to address it or resolve it. And she was right!

Scare-let grew up in the home of CEBSB’s Dr. Joan Mangan, Behavioral Scientist, who has a basement perfect for such artistic projects. Joan also contributed many of the creative ideas and details of the project. Joan not only provided the studio space -- she and her mother, Joanrose Mangan, provided dinner and refreshments on many evenings to inspire and fortify the branch during the creative and building process.

Over the weeks, Scare-let grew from a spindly frame of PVC pipe, chicken wire, and a tomato cage, to a ravishing young crow. She is dressed in a full drop-cloth dress painted in two shades of green, and wearing one very fancy hat. Rhett would have had no chance of resisting this Scare-let! At least, that’s CEBSB’s not-so-humble opinion.

Scare-let visited CDC prior to being transported to the Garden. Missing from photo: Ije Agulefo, Nakia Burgess, and Teresa Goss.

Scare-let visited CDC prior to being transported to the Garden. Missing from photo: Ije Agulefo, Nakia Burgess, and Teresa Goss.

Prior to being transported to the Atlanta Botanical Garden, Scare-let visited the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination on September 25 for her social debut. She received visitors all day in the CEBSB Graphics room. She quite graciously agreed to being photographed with a steady stream of admirers, and daintily refused to nibble any of the treats her family had brought in. She looked ready to take on all challengers in the big contest for which she had been prepared.

Through this one project, we were able to build teamwork and raise awareness about TB. Dr. Ken Castro, Director, Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, made the observation, “Often times, we spend thousands of dollars on management consultants for team-building activities. You all took a relatively inexpensive activity, and turned it into a great team building experience!”  All expenses for this activity were shared by the CEBSB staff ($25 entry fee, paint, other supplies), and participation was after regular work hours.  Because everyone involved had such fun this year in the creation of Scare-let Crow’Hara, planning has already started for next year’s entry!

In the battle for the public’s very short attention span, public health must be willing to use nontraditional means to educate the public. We educated people not only here at CDC, but throughout the city of Atlanta, through publicity in the following venues:

  • Article on AccessAtlanta website
  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution print article
  • Atlanta Botanical Garden Scarecrows in the Garden event
  • “Visit Scare-let at work” event
  • Article in CDC Connects (internal employee website)

In the Atlanta Journal-Constitution article about the scarecrows in the Garden, Scare-let Crow’Hara was one of only eight scarecrows – out of all 117 entered -- whose photo was included in the article.

We hope all CDC staff in Atlanta had a chance to come out to the Atlanta Botanical Garden and visit Scare-let Crow’Hara—the biggest TB educational product CEBSB has developed!

Submitted by Ann Lanner, Joan Mangan, Cheryl Tryon, and Wanda Walton
Div of TB Elimination

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