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Causal Agent:

Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) is caused by the nematode (roundworm) Dracunculus medinensis.

Life Cycle:

Life cycle of Dracunculiasis.

Humans become infected by drinking unfiltered water containing copepods (small crustaceans) which are infected with larvae of D. medinensis The number 1. Following ingestion, the copepods die and release the larvae, which penetrate the host stomach and intestinal wall and enter the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space The number 2. After maturation into adults and copulation, the male worms die and the females (length: 70 to 120 cm) migrate in the subcutaneous tissues towards the skin surface The number 3. Approximately one year after infection, the female worm induces a blister on the skin, generally on the distal lower extremity, which ruptures. When this lesion comes into contact with water, a contact that the patient seeks to relieve the local discomfort, the female worm emerges and releases larvae The number 4. The larvae are ingested by a copepod The number 5 and after two weeks (and two molts) have developed into infective larvae The number 6. Ingestion of the copepods closes the cycle The number 1.

 
Eradicating Guinea Worm Disease. 3.5 million cases in 1986 to 542 cases in 2012.
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