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New NIOSH Study Sheds Light on Long-Haul Truck Driver Health

January 16, 2014
NIOSH Update:

Contact: Christina Spring (202) 245-0633

A new study from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) finds that U.S. long-haul truck drivers were twice as likely to be obese compared to the adult working population, as well as more likely to smoke and suffer from other risk factors for chronic disease. The study, published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, is the first to provide a comprehensive look at the health status, risk factors, and work practices of long-haul truck drivers in the U.S.

NIOSH conducted the survey in 2010 interviewing 1,670 long-haul truck drivers at truck stops across the continental U.S. about their health and work practices. According to the survey, 69% of these drivers were obese and 54% smoked. Additionally, 88% of long-haul truck drivers reported having at least one risk factor (hypertension, smoking, and obesity) for chronic disease, compared to only 54% of the general U.S. adult working population.

“Truck drivers serve a vital role in our nation’s economy, ensuring the safe and timely delivery of goods across the U.S.,” said NIOSH Director John Howard, M.D. “This initial survey helps us work collaboratively with the trucking industry on understanding how to improve the lives of truckers both on the road and at home.”

Long-haul truck drivers are professional drivers of heavy and tractor-trailer trucks whose delivery routes require them to have to take sleep breaks away from home. There is limited information on illness and injury in this population, which prompted the survey by NIOSH. The data collected from this survey will help to establish a picture of the health conditions, risk factors, and work practices for U.S. long-haul truck drivers, giving the trucking industry and researchers valuable information to guide health and safety efforts.

The study is available online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajim.22293/abstract. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), within the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulates the health requirements and work schedules for truck drivers. FMCSA provided financial support for this study.

NIOSH is the federal agency that conducts research and makes recommendations for preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. For more information about NIOSH visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/.

 
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  • Page last reviewed: January 16, 2014
  • Page last updated: January 17, 2014
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