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NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MORTALITY SURVEILLANCE (NOMS)

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Publications

138 Publications Based On Data from

The National Occupational Mortality Surveillance (NOMS) Study 1985-2012

The Publications list contains the 138 published studies that were based on National Occupational Mortality Surveillance (NOMS) data during the years1985-2012.

  1. Robinson CF, Walker JT, Sweeney MH, Shen R, Schumacher PK, Ju J, Nowlin S. 2014. Overview of the National Occupational Mortality Surveillance (NOMS) System: Leukemia and Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk by Industry and Occupation in 30 U.S. States 1985-1999, 2003-2004 and 2007. In press.
  2. Violanti JM, Robinson CF, Shen R. Law Enforcement Suicide: A National Analysis. Inter J Emergency Mental Health Human Resilience 15(4):289-298.
  3. NIOSH Data and Statistics Gateway. NOMS PMRs and Charts 1984-1998 available at /niosh/data/. Last accessed July 28, 2012.
  4. Robinson CF, Schumacher PS, Lainez J, Sweeney MH. 2012. Guidelines to Reporting Industry and Occupation on the Death Certificate. NIOSH 2012.
  5. Robinson CF, Sullivan PA, Li J, Walker JT. 2011. Occupational Lung Cancer in U.S. Women 1984-1998. Am J Ind Med 54:102-1117.
  6. Sonnenberg A, Walker JT. Occupational Mortality Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the United States 1984-1998. Inflamm Bowel Dis. In press. 2011.
  7. Robinson CF, Sullivan PA., Li J, Walker JT. (2011) Female Occupational Lung Cancer Mortality 1984-1998. AJIM 54:102-117.
  8. Charney W, Ed. Handbook on Modern Hospital Safety. CRC Press. 2010.
  9. Violanti JM. Police Suicide: a National Comparison with fire-fighter and military personnel. 2010. Policing: an International Journal of Police Strategies and Management 33 (2): 270-286.
  10. Anon. State of the Sector Health Care and Social Assistance Identification of Research Opportunities for the Next Decade of NORA. Executive Summary. NIOSH publication number 2009-138.
  11. Anon. State of the Sector Health Care and Social Assistance Identification of Research Opportunities for the Next Decade of NORA. White Paper. NIOSH publication number 2009-139.
  12. Healthcare and Social Assistance. Advancing Priorities through Research and Partnerships. NIOSH Publication number 2009-137.
  13. Luckhaupt, S. and Calvert, GM. (2008). Deaths due to bloodborne infections and their sequelae among Health Care Workers. AJIM, 51(11), 812-824.
  14. Peterson, M. and Burnett, CA. (2008) The suicide of working Physicians and Dentists. Occup. Med, 58, 25-29.
  15. Robinson, CF., Schnorr T., Cassinelli, RT., Calvert, GM., Steenland, NK., Gersic, GM., Schubauer-Berigan MK. (2006). Tenth Revision, US Mortality Rates for use with the NIOSH Life Table System. JOM, 48, 662-667.
  16. Birdsey, J., Alterman, T., & Petersen, M. R. (2007). Race, occupation, and lung cancer: Detecting disparities with death certificate data. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 49(11), 1257-1263.
  17. Besson, H., Banks, R., & Boffetta, P. (2006). Cancer mortality among butchers: A 24-state death certificate study. Journal Of Occupational And Environmental Medicine, 48(3), 289-293.
  18. Bang, K. M., Weissman, D. N., Wood, J. M., & Attfield, M. D. (2005). Tuberculosis mortality by industry in the United States, 1990-1999. International Journal Of Tuberculosis And Lung Disease, 9(4), 437-442.
  19. Park, R. M., Schulte, P. A., Bowman, J. D., Walker, J. T., Bondy, S. C., Yost, M. G., Touchstone, J. A., & Dosemeci, M. (2005). Potential occupational risks for neurodegenerative diseases. American Journal Of Industrial Medicine, 48(1), 63-77.
  20. Robinson, C. F., & Burnett, C. A. (2005). Truck drivers and heart disease in the United States, 1979-1990. Am J Ind Med, 47(2), 113-119.
  21. Svec, M. A., Ward, M. H., Dosemeci, M., Checkoway, H., & De Roos, A. J. (2005). Risk of lymphatic or haematopoietic cancer mortality with occupational exposure to animals or the public. Occupational And Environmental Medicine, 62(10), 726-735.
  22. Finkelstein MN, Verma DK, Sahai D, Stefov E. Ischemic heart disease mortality among heavy equipment operators. Am J Ind Med. 2004 Jul;46(1):16-22.
  23. Steenland, K., Hu, S., & Walker, J. (2004). All-cause and cause-specific mortality by socioeconomic status among employed persons in 27 US states, 1984-1997. American Journal Of Public Health, 94(6), 1037-1042.
  24. Bang, K. M., Weissman, D. N., & Wood, J. M. (2003). Respiratory tuberculosis mortality by occupation and industry in the United States, 1990-1999. American Journal Of Epidemiology, 157(11), S100.
  25. Birdsey, J., Alterman, T., & Petersen, M. (2003). Examining racial disparity within occupation versus adjusting for race using the National Occupational Mortality Surveillance database. Paper presented at the American Public Health Association 131st Meeting and Exposition, San Francisco, CA.
  26. Calvert, G. M., Rice, F. L., Boiano, J. M., Sheehy, J. W., & Sanderson, W. T. (2003). Occupational Silica Exposure and Risk of Various Diseases: an Analysis using Death Certificates from 27 States of the United States. Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 60(2), 122–129.
  27. Steenland, K., Halperin, W., Hu, S., & Walker, J. T. (2003). Deaths due to injuries among employed adults: the effects of socioeconomic class. Epidemiology, 14(1), 74-79.
  28. Cucino, C., & Sonnenberg, A. (2002). Occupational mortality from squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in the United States during 1991-1996. Digestive Diseases & Sciences., 47(3), 568-572.
  29. Freedman, D. M., Dosemeci, M., & McGlynn, K. (2002). Sunlight and mortality from breast, ovarian, colon, prostate, and non-melanoma skin cancer: a composite death certificate based case-control study. Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 59(4), 257-262.
  30. Lee, E., Burnett, C. A., Lalich, N., Cameron, L. L., & Sestito, J. P. (2002). Proportionate mortality of crop and livestock farmers in the United States, 1984-1993. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 42(5), 410-420.
  31. Colt, J. S., Stallones, L., Cameron, L. L., Dosemeci, M., & Zahm, S. H. (2001). Proportionate mortality among US migrant and seasonal farmworkers in twenty-four states. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 40(5), 604-611.
  32. Cucino, C., & Sonnenberg, A. (2001). Occupational mortality from inflammatory bowel disease in the United States 1991-1996. American Journal of Gastroenterology., 96(4), 1101-1105.
  33. Lamba, A. B., Ward, M. H., Weeks, J. L., & Dosemeci, M. (2001). Cancer mortality patterns among hairdressers and barbers in 24 US states, 1984 to 1995. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 43(3), 250-258.
  34. Stern F, Lehman E, Ruder A. Mortality among unionized construction plasterers and cement masons. Am J Ind Med. 2001 Apr;39(4):373-88.
  35. Walsh, S. J., & DeChello, L. M. (2001). Excess autoimmune disease mortality among school teachers. Journal of Rheumatology, 28(7), 1537-1545.
  36. Chen, G. X., Johnston, J. J., Alterman, T., Burnett, C., Steenland, K., Stern, F., & Halperin, W. (2000). Expanded analysis of injury mortality among unionized construction workers. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 37(4), 364-373.
  37. Frank, E., Biola, H., & Burnett, C. A. (2000). Mortality rates and causes among U.S. physicians. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 19(3), 155-159.
  38. Freedman, D. M., Dosemeci, M., & Alavanja, M. C. (2000). Mortality from multiple sclerosis and exposure to residential and occupational solar radiation: a case-control study based on death certificates. Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 57(6), 418-421.
  39. Jemal, A., Grauman, D., & Devesa, S. (2000). Recent geographic patterns of lung cancer and mesothelioma mortality rates in 49 shipyard counties in the United States, 1970-94. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 37(5), 512-521.
  40. Loomis, D., & Schulz, M. (2000). Mortality from six work-related cancers among African Americans and Latinos. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 38(5), 565-575.
  41. Schulz, M. R., & Loomis, D. (2000). Occupational bladder cancer mortality among racial and ethnic minorities in 21 states. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 38(1), 90-98.
  42. Stern FB, Ruder AM, Chen G. Proportionate mortality among unionized roofers and waterproofers. Am J Ind Med. 2000 May;37(5):478-92.
  43. Barnett, E., Armstrong, D. L., & Casper, M. L. (1999). Evidence of increasing coronary heart disease mortality among black men of lower social class. Annals of Epidemiology, 9(8), 464-471.
  44. Burnett, C., Robinson, C., & Walker, J. (1999). Cancer mortality in health and science technicians. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(1), 155-158.
  45. Buxton JA, Gallagher RP, Le ND, Band PR, Bert JL. Occupational risk factors for prostate cancer mortality in British Columbia, Canada. Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jan;35(1):82-9
  46. Calvert, G. M., Merling, J. W., & Burnett, C. A. (1999). Ischemic heart disease mortality and occupation among 16-to 60- year-old males. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 41(11), 960-966.
  47. Cocco, P., & Dosemeci, M. (1999). Peritoneal cancer and occupational exposure to asbestos: results from the application of a job-exposure matrix. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 35(1), 9-14.
  48. Cocco, P., Heineman, E. F., & Dosemeci, M. (1999). Occupational risk factors for cancer of the central nervous system (CNS) among US women. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(1), 70-74.
  49. Cocco, P., Ward, M. H., & Dosemeci, M. (1999). Risk of stomach cancer associated with 12 workplace hazards: analysis of death certificates from 24 states of the United States with the aid of job exposure matrices. Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 56(11), 781-787.
  50. Fillmore, C. M., Petralia, S. A., & Dosemeci, M. (1999). Cancer mortality in women with probable exposure to silica: A death certificate study in 24 states of the US. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(1), 122-128.
  51. Kernan, G. J., Ji, B. T., Dosemeci, M., Silverman, D. T., Balbus, J., & Zahm, S. H. (1999). Occupational risk factors for pancreatic cancer: a case-control study based on death certificates from 24 U.S. states. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(2), 260-270.
  52. NIOSH. (1999). Work-Related Lung Disease Surveillance Report 1999 ((NIOSH) 2000-105). Morgantown, WV: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
  53. Petralia, S. A., Dosemeci, M., Adams, E. E., & Zahm, S. H. (1999). Cancer mortality among women employed in health care occupations in 24 US States, 1984-1993. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(1), 159-165.
  54. Robinson CF, Petersen M, Palu S. Mortality patterns among electrical workers employed in the U.S. construction industry, 1982-1987. Am J Ind Med. 1999 Dec;36(6):620-7.
  55. Robinson, C. F., & Walker, J. T. (1999). Cancer mortality among women employed in fast-growing U.S. occupations. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(1), 186-192.
  56. Walsh, S. J. (1999). Effects of non-mining occupational silica exposure on proportional mortality from silicosis and systemic sclerosis. Journal of Rheumatology., 26(10), 2179-2185.
  57. Cocco, P., Dosemeci, M., & Heineman, E. F. (1998). Brain cancer and occupational exposure to lead. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 40(11), 937-942.
  58. Cocco, P., Dosemeci, M., & Heineman, E. F. (1998). Occupational risk factors for cancer of the central nervous system: a case-control study on death certificates from 24 U.S. states. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 33(3), 247-255.
  59. Cocco, P., Ward, M. H., & Dosemeci, M. (1998). Occupational risk factors for cancer of the gastric cardia. Analysis of death certificates from 24 US states. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 40(10), 855-861.
  60. Dement JM, Hensley L, Kieding, Lipscomb H. Proportionate mortality among union members employed at three Texas refineries. Am J Ind Med 33:327-340, 1998.
  61. Krstev, S., Baris, D., Stewart, P. A., Hayes, R. B., Blair, A., & Dosemeci, M. (1998). Risk for prostate cancer by occupation and industry: a 24-state death certificate study. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 34(5), 413-420.
  62. Ma, F., Lee, D. J., Fleming, L. E., & Dosemeci, M. (1998). Race-specific cancer mortality in US firefighters: 1984-1993. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 40(12), 1134-1138.
  63. Nicholas, J. S., Lackland, D. T., Dosemeci, M., Mohr, L. C., Jr., Dunbar, J. B., Grosche, B., & Hoel, D. G. (1998). Mortality among US commercial pilots and navigators. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 40(11), 980-985.
  64. Savitz, D. A., Loomis, D. P., & Tse, C. K. (1998). Electrical occupations and neurodegenerative disease: analysis of U.S. mortality data. Archives of Environmental Health., 53(1), 71-74.
  65. Sala, M., Dosemeci, M., & Zahm, S. H. (1998). A death certificate-based study of occupation and mortality from reproductive cancers among women in 24 US states. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 40(7), 632-639.
  66. Ward, E. M., Burnett, C. A., Ruder, A., & Davis-King, K. (1997). Industries and cancer. Cancer Causes & Control, 8(3), 356-370.
  67. Freedman, D. M., Zahm, S. H., & Dosemeci, M. (1997). Residential and occupational exposure to sunlight and mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: composite (threefold) case-control study. Bmj., 314(7092), 1451-1455.
  68. Freedman Freedman DM, Dosemeci M, Alavanja MC. 2000. Mortality from multiple sclerosis and exposure to residential and occupational solar radiation: a case-control study based on death certificates. Occup Environ Med 57:418-421.
  69. Burnett, C., Maurer, J., Rosenberg, H. M., & Dosemeci, M. (1997). Mortality by Occupation, Industry, and Cause of Death, 24 Reporting States (1984-1988) ((NIOSH) 97-114). Cincinnati, OH: NIOSH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cincinnati, Ohio, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 97-114.
  70. Wagener, D. K., Walstedt, J., Jenkins, L., Burnett, C., Lalich, N., & Fingerhut, M. (1997). Women: work and health. Vital & Health Statistics - Series 3, Analytical & Epidemiological Studies(31), 1-91.
  71. Walker, J. T., Burnett, C. A., Lalich, N. R., Sestito, J. P., & Halperin, W. E. (1997). Cancer mortality among laundry and dry cleaning workers. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 32(6), 614-619.
  72. Schulte, P. A., & Burnett, C. A. (1997). EMFs and Alzheimer's disease. Neurology., 49(1), 312-313.
  73. Kang, S. K., Burnett, C. A., Freund, E., Walker, J., Lalich, N., & Sestito, J. (1997). Gastrointestinal cancer mortality of workers in occupations with high asbestos exposures. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 31(6), 713-718.
  74. Leigh JP, Markowitz SB, Fahs M, Shin C, Landrigan PJ. Occupational injury and illness in the United States. Estimates of costs, morbidity, and mortality. Arch Intern Med 157:1557-1568, 1997.
  75. Stern F, Sweeney MH, Ward E. Proportionate mortality among unionized construction ironworkers. Am J Ind Med. 31:176-187, 1997.
  76. Stern F, Sweeney MH. Proportionate mortality among unionized construction operating engineers. Am J Ind Med. 32:51-65, 1997.
  77. Peipins, L. A., Burnett, C., Alterman, T., & Lalich, N. (1997). Mortality patterns among female nurses: a 27-state study, 1984 through 1990. American Journal of Public Health., 87(9), 1539-1543.
  78. Alterman, T., Burnett, C., Peipins, L., Lalich, N., & Halperin, W. (1997). Occupation and cervical cancer: An opportunity for prevention. Journal of Womens Health, 6(6), 649-657.
  79. Chen, G. X., Burnett, C. A., Cameron, L. L., Alterman, T., Lalich, N. R., Tanaka, S., & Althouse, R. B. (1997). Tuberculosis Mortality and Silica Exposure: A Case-Control Study Based on a National Mortality Database for the Years 1983-1992. International Journal of Occupational & Environmental Health, 3(3), 163-170.
  80. Kross BC, Burmeister LF, Ogilvie LK, Fuortes LJ, Fu CM. Proportionate mortality study of golf course superintendents. Am J Ind Med. 1996 May;29(5):501-6.
  81. Park RM, Mirer FE. A survey of mortality at two automotive engine manufacturing plants. Am J Ind Med. 1996 Dec;30(6):664-73.
  82. Robinson CF, Petersen M, Sieber WK, et al. Mortality of Carpenters’ Union members employed in the U.S. construction or wood products industries, 1987-1990. Am J Ind Med 30:674-694, 1996.
  83. Halperin, W. E., & Ordin, D. L. (1996). Closing the surveillance gap.[comment]. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 29(2), 223-224.
  84. Schulte, P. A., Burnett, C. A., Boeniger, M. F., & Johnson, J. (1996). Neurodegenerative diseases: occupational occurrence and potential risk factors, 1982 through 1991. American Journal of Public Health, 86(9), 1281-1288.
  85. Rosenman KD, Stanbury M. Risk of lung cancer among former chromium smelter workers. Am J Ind Med. 1996 May;29(5):491-500.
  86. Robinson, C. F., Halperin, W. E., Alterman, T., Braddee, R. W., Burnett, C. A., Fosbroke, D. E., Kisner, S. M., Lalich, N. R., Roscoe, R. J., Seligman, P. J., & et al. (1995). Mortality patterns among construction workers in the United States. State of the Art Reviews in Occupational Medicine, Construction Safety and Health, 10(2), 269-283.
  87. Robinson, C., Stern, F., Halperin, W., Venable, H., Petersen, M., Frazier, T., Burnett, C., Lalich, N., Salg, J., Sestito, J., & et al. (1995). Assessment of mortality in the construction industry in the United States, 1984-1986. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 28(1), 49-70.
  88. Cantor, K. P., Stewart, P. A., Brinton, L. A., & Dosemeci, M. (1995). Occupational exposures and female breast cancer mortality in the United States. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine., 37(3), 336-348.
  89. Miller JM, Beaumont JJ. Suicide, cancer, and other causes of death among California veterinarians, 1960-1992. Am J Ind Med 27:37-49, 1995.
  90. CDC. (1995). Proportionate mortality from pulmonary tuberculosis associated with occupations--28 states, 1979-1990. MMWR - Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 44(1), 14-19.
  91. Figgs, L. W., Dosemeci, M., & Blair, A. (1995). United States non-Hodgkin's lymphoma surveillance by occupation 1984-1989: a twenty-four state death certificate study. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 27(6), 817-835.
  92. Ward, M. H., Dosemeci, M., & Cocco, P. (1994). Mortality from gastric cardia and lower esophagus cancer and occupation. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(11), 1222-1227.
  93. Burnett, C. A., & Dosemeci, M. (1994). Using Occupational Mortality Data for Surveillance of Work- Related Diseases of Women. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 36(11), 1199-1203.
  94. Burnett, C. A., Halperin, W. E., Lalich, N. R., & Sestito, J. P. (1994). Mortality among fire fighters: a 27 state survey. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 26(6), 831-833.
  95. Rosenman KD. Causes of mortality in primary and secondary school teachers. Am J Ind Med. 1994 May;25(5):749-58.
  96. Rubin, C. H., Burnett, C. A., Halperin, W. E., & Seligman, P. J. (1994). Occupation and lung cancer mortality among women: using occupation to target smoking cessation programs for women. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(11), 1234-1238.
  97. Burnett, C. A., Silverman, D. T., & Lalich, N. R. (1994). A Comparison of Analyses of Occupational Bladder-Cancer - Death Certificate Vs Population-Based Case-Control Interview. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 25(5), 677-688.
  98. Partanen T, Boffetta P. Cancer risk in asphalt workers and roofers: review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies. Am J Ind Med. 1994 Dec;26(6):721-40.
  99. Pottern, L. M., Zahm, S. H., Sieber, S. S., Schneider, I. J., LaRosa, J. H., Brown, D. P., Collman, G. W., Fingerhut, M. A., & Waters, M. A. (1994). Occupational cancer among women: a conference overview. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(8), 809-813.
  100. Park R, Krebs J, Mirer F. Mortality at an automotive stamping and assembly complex. Am J Ind Med. 1994 Oct;26(4):449-63.
  101. King AS, Threfall WJ, Band PR, Gallagher RP. Mortality among female registered nurses and school teachers in British Columbia. Am J Ind Med 26:125-132, 1994.
  102. Loomis, D. P., Savitz, D. A., & Ananth, C. V. (1994). Breast cancer mortality among female electrical workers in the United States. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 86(12), 921-925.
  103. Dosemeci, M., & Blair, A. (1994). Occupational cancer mortality among women employed in the telephone industry. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(11), 1204-1209.
  104. Dosemeci, M., Hoover, R. N., Blair, A., Figgs, L. W., Devesa, S., Grauman, D., & Fraumeni, J. F., Jr. (1994). Farming and prostate cancer among African-Americans in the southeastern United States. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 86(22), 1718-1719.
  105. Robinson, C. F., & Burnett, C. A. (1994). Mortality patterns of US female construction workers by race, 1979-1990. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(11), 1228-1233.
  106. Figgs, L. W., Dosemeci, M., & Blair, A. (1994). Risk of multiple myeloma by occupation and industry among men and women: a 24-state death certificate study. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 36(11), 1210-1221.
  107. Blair, A., Dosemeci, M., & Heineman, E. F. (1993). Cancer and other causes of death among male and female farmers from twenty-three states. Am J Ind Med, May; 23(5):729-742.
  108. Burkhart, G., Schulte, P. A., Robinson, C., Sieber, W. K., Vossenas, P., & Ringen, K. (1993). Job tasks, potential exposures, and health risks of laborers employed in the construction industry. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 24(4), 413-425.
  109. Rubin, C. H., Burnett, C. A., Halperin, W. E., & Seligman, P. J. (1993). Occupation as a risk identifier for breast cancer. American Journal of Public Health., 83(9), 1311-1315.
  110. Rosenberg, H. M., Burnett, C., Maurer, J., & Spirtas, R. (1993). Mortality by Occupation, Industry, and Cause of Death: 12 Reporting States, 1984. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 42(S4).
  111. Hayes, R. B., Dosemeci, M., Riscigno, M., & Blair, A. (1993). Cancer mortality among jewelry workers. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 24(6), 743-751.
  112. Cote, T. R., Dosemeci, M., Rothman, N., Banks, R. B., & Biggar, R. J. (1993). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and occupational exposure to hair dyes among people with AIDS.[comment]. American Journal of Public Health., 83(4), 598-599.
  113. McDougal L, Band PR, Spinelli JJ, Threlfall WJ, Gallagher RP. Mortality patterns in female domestic workers. Am J Ind Med. 1992;21(4):595-9.
  114. Harford, T. C., & Brooks, S. D. (1992). Cirrhosis mortality and occupation. Journal of Studies on Alcohol., 53(5), 463-468.
  115. Loomis, D. P. (1992). Cancer of breast among men in electrical occupations. Lancet, 339(8807), 1482-1483.
  116. Loomis, D. P., & Savitz, D. A. (1991). Occupation and leukemia mortality among men in 16 states: 1985-1987. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 19(4), 509-521.
  117. Robinson, C. F., Lalich, N. R., Burnett, C. A., Sestito, J. P., Frazier, T. M., & Fine, L. J. (1991). Electromagnetic field exposure and leukemia mortality in the United States. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 33(2), 160-162.
  118. Loomis, D. P. (1991). Occupation, industry, and fatal motor vehicle crashes in 20 states, 1986-1987. American Journal of Public Health., 81(6), 733-735.
  119. Kipen HM, Wartenberg D, Scully PF, Greenberg M. Are non-whites at greater risk for occupational cancer? Am J Ind Med. 1991;19(1):67-74.
  120. Lalich N, Burnett C, et al. (1990). A Guide for the Management, Analysis, & Interpretation of Occupational Mortality Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: 1-82.
  121. Lalich, N., Burnett, C., Robinson, C., Sestito, J., & Schuster, L. (1990). A Guide for the Management, Analysis, & Interpretation of Occupational Mortality Data (DHHS (NIOSH) 90-115): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
  122. Park RM, Silverstein MA, Green MA, Mirer FE. Brain cancer mortality at a manufacturer of aerospace electromechanical systems. Am J Ind Med. 1990;17(5)537-52.
  123. Hayes RB, Blair A, Steward PA, Herrick RF, Mahar H. Mortality of U.S. embalmers and funeral directors. Am J Ind Med 18:641-652, 1990.
  124. Loomis, D. P., & Savitz, D. A. (1990). Mortality from brain cancer and leukaemia among electrical workers. British Journal of Industrial Medicine., 47(9), 633-638.
  125. Robinson, C., Burnett, C., Lalich, N., & Brackbill, R. (1989). Selected Leads from the 1984 Occupational Mortality Surveillance Data. Cincinnati, OH: Illness Effects Section, NIOSH, Cincinnati, Ohio
  126. Maizlish N, Beaumont J, Singleton J. Mortality among California highway workers. Am J Ind Med. 1988;13(3):363-79.
  127. O’Brien TR, Decoufle P. Cancer mortality among Northern Georgia carpet and textile workers. Am J Ind Med 14:15-24, 1988.
  128. Dubrow, R., Burnett, C. A., Gute, D. M., & Brockert, J. E. (1988). Ischemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction mortality among police officers. Journal of Occupational Medicine., 30(8), 650-654.
  129. Dubrow R, Gute DM. Cause-specific mortality among male textile workers in Rhode Island. Am J Ind Med. 1988;13(4):439-54.
  130. Saftlas AF, Blair A, Cantor KP, Hanrahan L, Anderson HA. Cancer and other causes of death among Wisconsin farmers. Am J Ind Med. 1987;11(2):119-29.
  131. Walrath J, Decoufle P, Thomas TL. Mortality among workers in a shoe manufacturing company. Am J Ind Med. 1987;12(5):615-23.
  132. Alavanja MCR, Rush GA, Steward P, Blair A. Proportionate mortality study of workers in the grain industry. JNCI 78:247-252, 1987.
  133. Schwartz E. Proportionate mortality ratio analysis of automobile mechanics and gasoline service station workers in New Hampshire. Am J Ind Med. 1987;12(1):91-9.
  134. Dubrow R, Sestito JP, et al. (1987). “Death certificate-based occupational mortality surveillance in the United States.” Am J of Ind Med. 11(3):329-42.
  135. Mallin K, Berkely L, Young Q. A proportional mortality ratio study of workers in a construction equipment and diesel engine manufacturing plant. Am J Ind Med 10:127-141, 1986.
  136. Depue RH, Kagey BT, Heid MF. A proportional mortality study of the acting profession. Am J Ind Med 8:57-66, 1985.
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Glossary

What is NOMS?
NOMS stands for National Occupational Mortality Surveillance. It consists of a database that contains more than 11.5 million death records collected from 30 states during the periods 1985-1998 and 1999, 2003-2004, 2007-2010.

What is a PMR?
PMR stands for the proportionate mortality ratio. PMRs are computed by dividing the death count for an occupational group by the expected number of deaths in all occupations combined.For NOMS, all deaths are counted in the states and years that we studied. PMRs are computed when the population at risk of death is not known.

What is cause-of-death?
Population cause-specific mortality statistics are usually based on the cause of death stated on the death certificate. In most cases, cause of death is based on the physician’s diagnosis of the patient’s condition before death.

What is a death rate?
A death rate is computed by dividing the tabulated deaths by the number of people at risk of dying over a defined time interval.

What is NIOSH?
NIOSH stands for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

What is the underlying cause of death?
The underlying cause of death is the disease, injury or circumstance that led directly to death.

What is the ICD or how is the cause-of-death coded?
ICD stands for International Classification of Disease. It is the standardized coding system that categorizes disease used by nearly all countries. It was developed by the World Health Organization and is adapted for use in the United States.

FAQs

What is NIOSH?
NIOSH stands for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

What is NOMS?
NOMS stands for National Occupational Mortality Surveillance. It consists of a database that contains more than 11.5 million death records collected from 30 states during the periods 1985-1998 and 1999, 2003-2004, 2007-2010.

What data sources are used to build the NOMS data base?
Data sources include death certificates that contain age, race, sex, cause of death, usual occupation and kind of business or industry and other information about the circumstances of death and work-relatedness.

What is surveillance?
Surveillance is the repetitive collection, analysis and dissemination of data about the distribution of injury or disease.

Why do occupational mortality surveillance?
Occupational mortality surveillance provides suggestions about the types of jobs and work environments that may be riskier or more hazardous to work in. It also provides researchers, public health professionals and others a source of data with which to examine their own questions.

What kinds of studies can be done with the NOMS PMR query system for occupation or industry?
The query system produces PMRS or proportionate mortality ratios for selected occupational groups. PMRS are estimates of the death rate.

What do PMRs mean?
PMRs estimate the age adjusted death rate for an occupational or industrial group.

How do we describe a PMR result?
A PMR of 150 indicates that the proportionate mortality of an occupation-cause group is 1.5 times that expected proportionate mortality based on all groups in the population studied. Or the risk ratio of lung cancer is greater among loggers than among all groups studied. Or the risk ratio (PMR) for bartenders who die of an alcohol-related cause is higher (PMR=1.5) than that among all US deaths (PMR=1.00). PMRs must be interpreted cautiously, in conjunction with biologic plausibility or previous studies—they are not standalone figures. PMRs have biases that may inflate the estimate, if another cause such as injury has a very high PMR.

How do we Interpret PMRs?
PMR values should be interpreted with caution. PMRS are not meant to be stand-alone estimates of death rates. PMRS must be interpreted in context with other, relevant scientific data. These could include occupational exposures, biologic plausibility, and the results of other relevant studies. Epidemiologists and other researchers use the findings reported from NOMS data as an initial step in deciding to investigate them more fully by designing an epidemiologic study. For more information, see the Methods page.

What are the advantages of computing PMRs?
PMR’s can provide broad estimates of the risk of death among workers whose job history records are unrecorded. It is particularly advantageous for rare disease, small ethnic or race-sex groups that are not often studied.

Are PMRs valid estimators of death rates?
To the extent that the group being studied represents the frequency of disease in the actual population, PMRs will be more valid.

What are some of the drawbacks to using PMRs?
A biased PMR is computed whenever the cause of death is either over or under represented. For example, loggers have a very high fatal injury mortality rate. Expected deaths from non-accidental causes can be inflated and falsely low PMRs for other causes can result.

Is there a Bibliography of peer reviewed articles published that used NOMs data?
Yes. See Pubs on the NOMS home page.

What is our data source for cause of death, occupation and industry?
The NOMS database was made from data collected from death certificates that are filed in state registration offices at the time of death, and transmitted to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Can NOMS data be released to external requestors?
The results of the NOMS data analysis are provided through use of the PMRs and charts query systems. However, NOMS data may not be released due to data agreements with the US states and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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