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NPPTL011 - Physiological Evaluation of Tight- and Loose-Fitting PAPRs, Funded under PanFlu CAN# 921ZJSM

Start Date: 10/1/2010
End Date: 9/30/2012

Principal Investigator (PI)
Name: Nina Turner
Phone: 304-285-5976
Organization: NIOSH
Sub-Unit: NPPTL
Funded By: NIOSH

Primary Goal Addressed
5.0

Secondary Goal Addressed
9.0


Attributed to Manufacturing
50%

Project Description

Short Summary

The purpose of this laboratory-based research project is to evaluate the metabolic and respiratory responses of men and women wearers of commercially available PAPRís at rest and during low-and moderate-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The specific goals are to measure inhaled gas concentrations, pressures, and temperatures while men and women wear six different manufacturersí PAPRís at rest and during treadmill walking.

This project addresses the Cross-Sector Program goals for Personal Protective Technology of reducing exposure to both inhalation and dermal hazards.

Outputs from this project will include dissemination of results via presentations at national and stakeholders meetings and a peerreviewed journal publication. An outcome will be the incorporation of findings into the test procedures contained in a draft updated PAPR certification module to be produced by the Policy and Standards Development Branch, NPPTL. Ultimately, completion of the objectives of this project will result in a significant step toward reducing inhalation injuries to wearers of PAPRís.



Description

The purpose of this laboratory-based research project is to evaluate the metabolic and respiratory responses of men and women wearers of commercially available PAPRís at rest and during low-and moderate-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The specific goals are to measure inhaled gas concentrations, pressures, and temperatures while men and women wear six different manufacturersí PAPRís at rest and during low-and moderate-intensity treadmill walking. The objective of the project is to provide findings to the Policy and Standards Development Branch, NPPTL, for incorporation into a draft certification module for PAPRís.

This research will be conducted in the Physiology Laboratory of the Technology Research Branch, NPPTL. Subjects will be recruited from the Pittsburgh area, will provide informed consent before participating in the study, and will receive a medical examination prior to being accepted into the study. Subjects will complete testing in approximately three hours. Testing will consist of seated rest (10 minutes), treadmill walking at 2.0 mph (10 minutes), and treadmill walking at 3.0 mph (10 minutes) while wearing a tee shirt, pants, and a face mask to collect metabolic and respiratory data. Subjects will then don six different PAPRís and repeat the rest and exercise bouts. Descriptive statistics will be used to determine mean inhaled oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations and inhalation and exhalation pressures and temperatures.

During first and second quarter FY11, a protocol will be developed with the input of Policy and Standards Development Branch personnel and external stakeholders such as PAPR manufacturers. Peer review of the research protocol will be completed by the end of 3Q FY11. NIOSH Human Subject Review Board (HSRB) approval will be obtained by 4Q FY11. All human subject testing will be completed by the end of 2Q FY12. Data analysis will be completed by 2Q FY12, and a draft manuscript will be completed by 4Q FY12.

This project will be conducted with input from the Policy and Standards Development Branch, NPPTL, PAPR manufacturers, and members of relevant standards-setting groups. Outputs will include dissemination of results via presentations at national and stakeholders meetings and a peer-reviewed journal publication. An outcome will be the incorporation of findings into the test procedures contained in a draft updated PAPR module to be produced by the Policy and Standards Development Branch.

Ultimately, completion of the objectives of this project will result in a significant step toward reducing injuries to wearers of PAPRís.



Mission Relevance

Powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRís) are respirators with either a tight-fitting facepiece or a loose-fitting hood or helmet.

These respirators are increasingly being sold to healthcare institutions for the protection of healthcare workers and are being advertised as providing a high degree of comfort, mobility, visibility, and respiratory protection. They are currently worn by workers in the chemical and painting/blasting industries. There are currently no NIOSH human subject certification test standards for PAPRís. A draft concept paper for human subject testing has been published (http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docket/NIOSHdocket0008.html ); however, recent human subject data on PAPR wearers is lacking.

The National Academies report ďPersonal Protective Technology Program at NIOSHĒ (2008) was used to help define the need for this project. The report lists as its fourth recommendation to ďIncrease Research on the Use and Usability of PPT.Ē

A primary mission of the Technology Evaluation Branch of the National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL), NIOSH, is to certify respiratory protective equipment according to standards contained in 42 CFR Part 84. As part of that mission, test regulations are updated/revised on an ongoing basis through the publication of certification modules for public comment. A module for the testing and certification of PAPRís has been proposed; however, recent research including human subject testing of currently available loose and tight-fitting PAPRís is lacking. The goal of this project is to evaluate the metabolic and respiratory responses of wearers of PAPRís at rest and during low-intensity exercise on a treadmill. Findings will be provided to the Policy and Standards Development Branch, NPPTL, in support of future updates of PAPR modules.



Page last updated: June 3, 2011
Page last reviewed: May 23, 2011
Content Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of the Director

 

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