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NIOSH Program Portfolio

 

Manufacturing

NORA Manufacturing Sector Strategic Goals

927ZGGB - A Standard Method for Determining Airborne Nanoparticle Size

Start Date: 10/1/2008
End Date: 9/30/2010

Principal Investigator (PI)
Name: Aleks Stefaniak
Phone: 304-285-6302
E-mail: boq9@cdc.gov
Organization: NIOSH
Sub-Unit: DRDS
Funded By: NIOSH

Primary Goal Addressed
5.0

Secondary Goal Addressed
None


Attributed to Manufacturing
100%

Project Description

Short Summary

This project will utilize three spherical colloidal gold nanoscale SRMs to develop a scientifically credible method for accurately measuring workplace EN size distributions and may help to improve the scientific basis for EN exposure assessment. Additionally, to begin to address the issue of how to measure progressively more complex EN morphology regimes, we will develop sizing specifications for morphology categories of occupationally-relevant EN. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a validated NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods standard method to measure EN particle size on air samples; such a method would provide hygienists with a needed quantitative tool for assessing potential inhalation exposure.



Description

The purpose of this project is to adapt current air sampling methods and electron microscopy techniques to accurately measure workplace EN particle size distributions. This project will utilize three spherical colloidal gold nanoscale SRMs with certified particle sizes of 10 (SRM 8011), 30 (SRM 8012), and 60 nm (SRM 8013) recently issued by NIST. We hypothesize that scientifically credible nanoscale RMs will enable development of a method for accurately measuring workplace EN size distributions and may help to improve the scientific basis for EN exposure assessment. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a validated NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods standard method to measure EN particle size on air samples; such a method would provide hygienists with a needed quantitative tool for assessing potential inhalation exposure.

We will use colloidal gold nanoparticle SRMs to evaluate particle size on two types of air sampling media: 3-mm microscopy grids and three different types of filter media (specific aim 1). Next, we will evaluate gold SRM particle size in samples containing mixtures of SRM particles with carbon and/or metal oxide nanoparticles; specificity of the method for gold will be confirmed using TEM-XEDS analysis (specific aim 2). To begin to address the issue of how to measure progressively more complex EN morphology regimes, we will develop sizing specifications for morphology categories of occupationally-relevant EN (specific aim 3). Based on media characteristics and sizing accuracy, we will select the best air sampling medium, and using the sample preparation and TEM analysis protocols developed in the earlier aims, conduct a round-robin evaluation (participants may include, but are not limited to NIOSH, Bureau Veritas N.A., Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Clarkson University) of the method using the gold SRM particles (specific aim 4). Finally, in conjunction with NIOSH NTRC field sampling surveys, we will evaluate the EN particle sizing method by collecting area and personal breathing zone sampling of workers potentially exposed to airborne EN during manufacturing and analyze the samples using TEM-XEDS with nanoscale gold SRM material as an internal standard.



Objectives

The purpose of this project is to adapt current air sampling methods and electron microscopy techniques to accurately measure workplace EN particle size distributions. This project will utilize three spherical colloidal gold nanoscale SRMs with certified particle sizes of 10 (SRM 8011), 30 (SRM 8012), and 60 nm (SRM 8013) recently issued by NIST. We hypothesize that scientifically credible nanoscale RMs will enable development of a method for accurately measuring workplace EN size distributions and may help to improve the scientific basis for EN exposure assessment.

We will use colloidal gold nanoparticle SRMs to evaluate particle size on two types of air sampling media: 3-mm microscopy grids and three different types of filter media (specific aim 1). Next, we will evaluate gold SRM particle size in samples containing mixtures of SRM particles with carbon and/or metal oxide nanoparticles; specificity of the method for gold will be confirmed using TEM-XEDS analysis (specific aim 2). To begin to address the issue of how to measure progressively more complex EN morphology regimes, we will develop sizing specifications for morphology categories of occupationally-relevant EN (specific aim 3). Based on media characteristics and sizing accuracy, we will select the best air sampling medium, and using the sample preparation and TEM analysis protocols developed in the earlier aims, conduct a round-robin evaluation (participants may include, but are not limited to NIOSH, Bureau Veritas N.A., Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Clarkson University) of the method using the gold SRM particles (specific aim 4). Finally, in conjunction with NIOSH NTRC field sampling surveys, we will evaluate the EN particle sizing method by collecting area and personal breathing zone sampling of workers potentially exposed to airborne EN during manufacturing and analyze the samples using TEM-XEDS with nanoscale gold SRM material as an internal standard.



Mission Relevance

This research addresses the scientific knowledge critical to the assessment of exposures to engineered nanomaterials (EN) in the workplace. The nanotechnology industry presents a unique opportunity for proactively approaching exposure assessment: its impact is predicted to far exceed that of the Industrial Revolution and nanotechnology-enabled products are projected to become a $1 trillion market by the year 2015 (Nel et al., 2005). This project aims to improve understanding of techniques for assessing particle size as a metric of exposure in the workplace and will provide a framework for assessing particle size of EN having complex morphologies. As part of a larger series of studies funded by the NIOSH Nanotechnology Research Center, this work contributes to research priorities in development of exposure assessment methods and control technologies/intervention effectiveness (e.g., altering exposure particle size distributions).



Page last updated: June 3, 2011
Page last reviewed: May 23, 2011
Content Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of the Director

 

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Manufacturing