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Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE)

Photo: Child working at deskCDC established regional centers of excellence for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. These centers make up the Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) Network.

Current Activities

The CADDRE Network is working on the Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). SEED is the largest study in the United States to help identify factors that may put children at risk for ASDs and other developmental disabilities.

 

Graphic: US Map of CADDRE sites, California, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania

Previous Activities

Prior to working on SEED, the goals of the CADDRE project were to:

  • Work with the ADDM Network to monitor the number of children with ASD and other developmental disabilities.
  • Improve community and service provider awareness of ASD and other developmental disabilities, or improve access of children with ASD and other developmental disabilities to comprehensive, community-based, family-centered care.
  • Conduct epidemiologic research related to ASD and other developmental disabilities. These studies addressed topics such as what factors (genetic, environment, and others) make it more likely that a child will have an ASD, what other disabilities children with ASD have, biomarkers, and the economic costs of ASD.

CADDRE Publications

To find other publications related to ASD, visit our Articles page.

 

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"Children with autism spectrum disorder are not being diagnosed as early as they could be. Learn the signs of autism and get help if you’re concerned."

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