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Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors Among States and Selected Local Areas — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

Fang Xu, PhD1

Tebitha Mawokomatanda, MS1

David Flegel, MS1

Carol Pierannunzi, PhD2

William Garvin2

Pranesh Chowdhury, MD2

Simone Salandy, PhD1

Carol Crawford, PhD2

Machell Town, PhD2

1Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia

2Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC


Corresponding author: Machell Town, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC. Telephone: (404)498-0503; E-mail: mpt2@cdc.gov.

Abstract

Problem: Chronic conditions (e.g., heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, malignant neoplasms, and diabetes), infectious diseases (e.g., influenza and pneumonia), and unintentional injuries are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Adopting positive health behaviors (e.g., staying physically active, quitting tobacco use, always wearing seatbelts in automobiles) and accessing preventive health-care services (e.g., getting routine physical checkups, receiving recommended vaccinations on appropriate schedules, checking blood pressure and cholesterol and maintaining them at healthy levels) can reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic and infectious diseases. Monitoring the health-risk behaviors of a community's residents as well as their participation in and access to health-care services provides information critical to the development and maintenance of intervention programs as well as the implementation of strategies and health policies that address public health problems at the levels of state and territory, metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA), and county.

Reporting Period: January–December 2011.

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit–dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. BRFSS collects data on health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services and practices related to the leading causes of death and disabilities in the United States. In 2011, BRFSS adopted a new weighting methodology (iterative proportional fitting, or raking) and for the first time included data from respondents who solely use cellular telephones (i.e., do not use landlines). This report presents results for the year 2011 for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and participating U.S. territories including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and Guam, 198 MMSAs, and 224 counties.

Results: In 2011, the estimated prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services substantially varied by state and territory, MMSA, and county. The following portion of this abstract summarizes selected results by some BRFSS measures. Each set of proportions refers to the range of estimated prevalence of the behaviors, diseases, or use of preventive health-care services as reported by survey respondents. Adults with good or better health: 65.5%−88.0% for states and territories, 72.0%−92.4% for MMSAs, and 74.3%−94.2% for counties. Adults aged <65 years with health–care coverage: 65.4%−92.3% for states and territories, 66.8%−94.7% for MMSAs, and 61.3%−95.6% for counties. Influenza vaccination received during the preceding 12 months among adults aged ≥65 years: 28.6%−70.2% for states and territories, 42.0% −80.0% for MMSAs, and 41.1%−78.2% for counties. Adults meeting the federal physical activity recommendations for both aerobic physical activity and muscle–strengthening activity: 8.5%–27.3% for states and territories, 7.3%–32.0% for MMSAs, and 11.0%–32.0% for counties. Current cigarette smokers: 11.8%–30.5% for states and territories, 8.4%–30.6% for MMSAs, and 8.1%–35.2% for counties. Binge drinking during the last month: 10.0%–25.0% for states and territories, 7.0%–32.5% for MMSAs, and 7.0%–32.5% for counties. Adults always wearing seatbelts while driving or riding in a car: 63.9%−94.1% for states and territories, 51.8%−96.9% for MMSAs, and 51.8%−97.0% for counties. Adults aged ≥18 who were obese: 20.7%–34.9% for states and territories, 15.1%–37.2% for MMSAs, and 15.1%−41.0% for counties. Adults with diagnosed diabetes: 6.7%–13.5% for states and territories, 3.9%–15.9% for MMSAs, and 3.5%–18.3% for counties. Adults with current asthma: 4.3%–12.1% for states and territories, 2.9%–14.1% for MMSAs, and 2.9%–15.6% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had coronary heart disease: 7.1%–16.2% for states and territories, 5.0%–19.4% for MMSAs, and 3.9%–18.5% for counties. Adults using special equipment because of any health problem: 5.1%–11.3% for states and territories, 3.9%–13.2% for MMSAs, and 2.4%–14.7% for counties.

Interpretation: Because of the recent change in the BRFSS methodology, the results should not be compared with those from previous years. The findings in this report indicate that substantial variations exist in the reported health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, disabilities, access to health-care services, and the use of preventive health services among U.S. adults at state and territory, MMSA, and county levels. The findings underscore the continued need for surveillance of health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, and use of preventive health-care services as well as surveillance-informed programs designed to help improve health-related risk behaviors, levels of chronic disease and disability, and the access to and use of preventive services and health-care resources.

Public Health Action: State and local health departments and agencies can continue to use BRFSS data to identify populations at high risk for certain unhealthy behaviors and chronic conditions. Additionally, they can use the data to inform the design, implementation, direction, monitoring, and evaluation of public health programs, policies, and use of preventive services that can lead to a reduction in morbidity and mortality among U.S. residents.

Introduction

Chronic conditions (e.g., heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, malignant neoplasms, and diabetes), infectious diseases (e.g., influenza and pneumonia), and unintentional injuries are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States (1,2). Engaging in healthy behaviors (e.g., quitting smoking and all other tobacco use, increasing physical activity), accessing preventive health-care services (e.g., having routine physical checkups, checking blood pressure, testing blood cholesterol, and receiving recommended vaccinations), and reducing risks of injuries (e.g., always wearing a seatbelt while in an automobile) can reduce morbidity and mortality from those diseases and injuries as well as lower medical costs associated with treating them (3).

Ongoing state-based surveillance is essential to monitor health issues and disparities and to design, implement, and evaluate health programs and policies that address the public health needs of a community or region. Published reports indicate the estimated prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, and use of preventive services vary substantially across the United States (4,5).

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the world's largest ongoing telephone survey (6). Since 1984, CDC has assisted state and territorial health departments in conducting the BRFSS survey each year as they track health conditions and health-risk behaviors. The survey is one of the main data sources that public health officials and practitioners use to track chronic conditions, health-risk behaviors, use of preventive health services, and emerging health problems at state, county, and metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) levels. The data are frequently used to set health goals as well as to monitor progress and success of public health programs and policy implementation at national, state, and local levels. Since 2002, the sufficient sample size in BRFSS has facilitated analysis of prevalence estimates for selected MMSAs, metropolitan divisions, and their counties. This report includes 2011 BRFSS findings related to selected chronic conditions, health-risk behaviors, and use of preventive health-care services.

Methods

BRFSS is a cross-sectional, random-digit–dialed, state-based survey that includes more than 400,000 adult participants aged ≥18 years who completed interviews annually (7). BRFSS uses a multistage sampling design to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult population in each state and territory. Details of the validity and reliability of the measures of BRFSS survey methodology have been described elsewhere (8,9).

Questionnaire

The standard BRFSS questionnaire consists of three sections: core questions, optional modules, and state-added questions. Eligible respondents answer the same core questions in all states, the District of Columbia, and participating U.S. territories. The 2011 core questions were used to inquire about participants' health status, number of healthy days in the past 30 days, health-care access, hypertension awareness, cholesterol awareness, chronic health conditions, tobacco use, demographics, consumption of fruits and vegetables, physical activity, disability, arthritis-related conditions, seatbelt use, immunization, alcohol consumption, and screening of and risk for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS).

States also add questions to BRFSS that are specifically designed to address state-specific health issues or to track a state's health objectives. Optional modules were selected by states based on the specific needs and goals of the programs in each state's health department. In 2011, the following optional models were used by at least one state: actions to control high blood pressure (nine states), adult asthma history (one state), adult human papilloma virus immunization (three states), adverse childhood experience (five states), anxiety and depression (two states), arthritis management (five states), breast/cervical cancer screening (two states), cardiovascular health (six states), child immunization—influenza (five states), childhood asthma (17 states), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (nine states), cognitive impairment (seven states), colorectal cancer screening (one state), diabetes (14 states), heart attack and stroke (three states), inadequate sleep (three states), pre-diabetes (16 states), preconception health/family planning (three states), prostate cancer screening (one state), random child selection (18 states), shingles immunization (two states), smoking cessation (one state), social context (three states), sugar-sweetened beverages and menu labeling (three states), and veteran's health (two states).

For certain modules collected by landline telephone only, states could have chosen to split the modules by dividing the samples so only a portion of the respondents answer certain module questions. In 2011, there were up to three module versions; there were no split versions of a module whose data were collected only by cellular telephone. Modules that appear in every version of a state's questionnaire are called "common" modules and provide data that might have been collected by combined cellular telephone/landline telephone or by landline telephone only. All the responses were self-reported.

Data Collection and Processing

Since 2007, BRFSS surveys have been collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and Guam. In 2011, the U.S. Virgin Islands did not collect BRFSS data. A computer-assisted telephone interviewing system is used to conduct the survey. State-collected data are submitted to CDC for processing, checking, and weighting.

New BRFSS Methodology Adopted in 2011

Sampling

In 2011, one of BRFSS's major protocol changes included reaching and interviewing survey participants on their cellular telephones. Before 2011, BRFSS contacted survey participants on their landline telephones only. Using a dual-frame survey including combined landline and cellular telephones improved validity, reliability, and representativeness of BRFSS data (10). In addition, beginning in 2011, a new weighting methodology (raking) replaced poststratification, which had been used to weight the data every year before 2011. Also known as iterative proportional fitting, raking is performed by adjusting one demographic variable at a time in an iterative process until a convergence of a set value is reached. Details of the protocol changes are described in the discussion.

Data Weighting

State-level weights were adjusted to produce MMSA- and county-level weights. Respondents were assigned to an MMSA based on their county FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standards) codes. MMSAs were selected in the MMSA data if there were ≥500 respondents. Unlike previous years, counties that had ≥500 respondents were selected in 2011, regardless of whether they were defined within boundaries of MMSAs. Information about weighting MMSA and county BRFSS data can be found on the BRFSS SMART webpage (11).

Statistical Analyses

Data in this report are presented as direct estimates. To account for the complex survey design of BRFSS, this report provides comparable unweighted sample size, weighted prevalence estimates with standard errors and 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of chronic conditions, risk behaviors, and use of preventive health-care services by states and territories, MMSAs, and counties using 2011 BRFSS data. If the unweighted sample size was represented by <50 survey participants or the relative standard error (RSE) was >30%, the results for certain MMSAs or counties were suppressed to avoid unstable estimates. In 2011, RSE replaced the previous criterion that the half-width of the 95% confidence interval was >10. RSE was calculated by dividing the standard error of the estimate by the estimate and multiplying by 100 (for percent). Estimates where RSEs were <30% provide more reliable results (13). Responses coded as "do not know", or "refused" were excluded from the analyses. The analysis was conducted using statistical software.

About This Report

This report presents statistical analyses and discussion of the following topics: 1) health status indicators (self-rated health status, health-care coverage), 2) preventive practices (recent routine physical checkup, influenza vaccination, and pneumococcal vaccination for persons aged ≥65 years, blood cholesterol check, and physical activity), 3) health-risk behaviors (current cigarette smoking, binge drinking, heavy drinking, no leisure-time physical activity, and always wearing a seatbelt), 4) chronic conditions (obesity for persons aged ≥18 years, diabetes, cancer survivors, current asthma, arthritis, and depression), 5) cardiovascular conditions (high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, coronary heart disease, and stroke for persons aged ≥45 years), and 6) disability (activity limitation and use of special equipment because of physical, mental, or emotional problems). The 2011 questionnaire and all related support documents are available on the BRFSS webpage (12).

Results

In 2011, approximately 506,000 adults completed interviews on landline telephones and cellular telephones. The BRFSS data set comprised results from 54 states and territories, 198 MMSAs, and 224 counties with sufficient sample sizes. For data collected by landline telephone, 450,285 respondents completed the BRFSS survey interview. Numbers of participants ranged from 3,302 in Alaska to 20,837 in Nebraska (median: 7,440). For data collected by cellular telephone, 73,518 respondents completed the survey interview, with participant numbers ranging from 76 in Tennessee to 5,613 in Nebraska (median: 1,109). Since 2011, response rates for BRFSS have been calculated using the standard set by the American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) response rate formula 4, which is the number of respondents who completed the survey as a proportion of all eligible and likely eligible persons (14). For landline telephone data, the AAPOR response rate ranged from 37.4% in California to 66.5% in South Dakota (median: 53.0%). For cellular telephone data, the AAPOR response rate ranged from 20.2% in Pennsylvania to 54.0% in Iowa (median: 27.9%). For combined landline telephone and cellular telephone data, the weighted response rate ranged from 33.8% in New York to 64.1% in South Dakota (median: 49.7%). Detailed information on response, cooperation, and refusal rates can be found in the BRFSS 2011 Summary Data Quality Report (15).

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Respondents rated their general health as being excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. The responses were then categorized into two groups: those who reported that their health was excellent, very good, or good and those who reported that their health was fair or poor. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 65.5% in Puerto Rico to 88.0% in Minnesota (median: 82.8%) (Table 1). Among selected MMSAs, the self-reported prevalence estimate of good or better health ranged from 72.0% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia, to 92.4% in Brookings, South Dakota (median: 83.7%) (Table 2). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health ranged from 74.3% in Kanawha County, West Virginia, to 94.2% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 84.4%) (Table 3).

Health-Care Coverage

Health-care coverage was defined as currently having any kind of coverage including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations) or a government plan (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid) among adults aged <65 years. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of health-care coverage among adults aged <65 years ranged from 65.4% in Texas to 92.3% in Massachusetts (median: 78.7%) (Table 4). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 66.8% in Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, to 94.7% in Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts (median: 80.5%) (Table 5). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 61.3% in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to 95.6% in Norfolk County, Massachusetts (median: 80.8%) (Table 6).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

A routine physical checkup was defined as a visit to a doctor for a general physical examination rather than for a specific injury, illness, or condition. A recent routine checkup was defined as one visit that occurred within the last 12 months. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of having a recent routine physical checkup among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 53.5% in Wyoming to 79.0% in Delaware (median: 66.5%) (Table 7). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.6% in Bozeman, Montana, to 80.6% in Barnstable Town and Peabody, Massachusetts (median: 66.8%) (Table 8). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.6% in Gallatin County, Montana, to 82.8% in Bristol County, Massachusetts (median: 66.5%) (Table 9).

Influenza Vaccination

Seasonal influenza vaccination was administered in two ways: either by an injection into the arm or introduction of a spray, mist, or drop into the nose (FluMist). In 2011, the estimated prevalence of influenza vaccine among adults aged ≥65 years during the preceding 12 months ranged from 28.6% in Puerto Rico to 70.2% in Iowa and Louisiana (median: 60.7%) (Table 10). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 42.0% in Havre, Montana, to 80.0% in Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota (median: 62.4%) (Table 11). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 41.1% in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, to 78.2% in Polk County, Iowa (median: 61.8%) (Table 12).

Pneumococcal Vaccination Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of ever having received a pneumococcal vaccine injection among adults aged ≥65 years ranged from 22.9% in Puerto Rico to 76.0% in Oregon (median: 70.0%) (Table 13). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 50.2% in Aberdeen, South Dakota, to 85.3% in Eugene-Springfield, Oregon (median: 71.3%) (Table 14). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 46.2% in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to 85.3% in Arapahoe County, Colorado, and Lane County, Oregon (median: 71.4%) (Table 15).

Blood Cholesterol Check During the Last 5 Years

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of having had a blood-cholesterol check during the preceding 5 years among adults (who might or might not have ever had one) aged ≥18 ranged from 61.9% in Guam to 83.7 in Massachusetts (median: 75.5) (Table 16). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 59.0% in Missoula, Montana, to 87.8% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 75.7%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 59.0% in Missoula County, Montana, to 87.8% in Barnstable County, Massachusetts (median: 76.2%) (Table 18).

Meeting Federal Physical Activity Recommendations

Current federal physical activity guidelines included recommendations for aerobic and for muscle strengthening activity. To assess the recommendation for aerobic physical activity (16), the time spent in moderate (3.0–5.9 metabolic equivalents [METs]) and vigorous (≥6.0 METs) intensity activity was calculated based on the two most frequently reported activities using previously described methods (17). Another variable was generated to indicate whether or not muscle-strengthening activities were done 2 or more days a week.

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who engaged in moderate aerobic physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week, or vigorous activity for at least 75 minutes per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity during the past month ranged from 33.8% in Puerto Rico to 61.8% in Colorado (median: 51.6%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 36.4% in Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, to 72.5% in Boulder, Colorado (median: 52.1%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 34.4% in Dakota County, Nebraska, to 72.5% in Boulder County, Colorado (median: 52.9%) (Table 21).

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who engaged in moderate aerobic physical activity for at least 300 minutes per week or vigorous activity for at least 150 minutes per week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity during the past month, ranged from 15.0% in Puerto Rico to 40.7% in Colorado and Oregon (median: 32.0%) (Table 22). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 21.2% in Watertown, South Dakota, to 48.1% in Heber, Utah (median: 31.8%) (Table 23). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 20.0% in Dakota County, Nebraska, to 48.1% in Wasatch County, Utah (median: 32.6%) (Table 24).

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who performed muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days per week during the past month ranged from 12.1% in Puerto Rico to 36.1% in the District of Columbia (median: 29.6%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.5% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia, to 43.4% in Midland, Texas (median: 30.1%) (Table 26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 17.0% in Eastland County, Texas, to 43.4% in Midland County, Texas (median: 31.0%) (Table 27).

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of adults who met the objectives for aerobic physical activities and for muscle-strengthening activities during the past month ranged from 8.5% in Puerto Rico to 27.3% in Colorado (median: 20.9%) (Table 28). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.3% in Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia, to 32.0% in Boulder, Colorado (median: 21.0%) (Table 29). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 11.0% in Dakota County, Nebraska, to 32.0% in Boulder County, Colorado (median: 21.8%) (Table 30).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Current cigarette smokers were defined as respondents who reported they had smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and, at the time of the interview, smoked every day or some days. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of current cigarette smokers aged ≥18 years ranged from 11.8% in Utah to 30.5% in Guam (median: 21.2%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 8.4% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 30.6% in Casper, Wyoming, and Monroe, Louisiana (median: 21.0%) (Table 32). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 8.1% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 35.2% in Thurston County, Nebraska (median: 19.3%) (Table 33).

Binge Drinking

A survey participant was considered to be a binge drinker if, in the past month, he was a man aged ≥18 years who had an average of five or more drinks during one occasion or she was a woman aged ≥18 years who had an average of four or more drinks during one occasion. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of binge drinkers ranged from 10.0% in Tennessee to 25.0% in the District of Columbia (median: 18.3%) (Table 34). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.0% in Tyler, Texas, to 32.5% in Midland, Texas (median: 18.7%) (Table 35). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.0% in Smith County, Texas, to 32.5% in Midland County, Texas (median: 18.8%) (Table 36).

Heavy Drinking

A survey participant was considered to be a heavy drinker if he was a man aged ≥18 years who had an average of more than two drinks per day during the last month or she was a woman aged ≥18 years who had an average of more than one drink per day during the last month. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of heavy drinkers ranged from 3.4% in Tennessee to 9.8% in Wisconsin (median: 6.6%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.4% in Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia, to 12.1% in Tallahassee, Florida (median: 6.9%) (Table 38). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.3% in Queens County, New York, to 13.3% in Hunterdon County, New Jersey (median: 6.9%) (Table 39).

No Leisure-time Physical Activity

No leisure-time physical activity was defined as not participating in any physical activity or exercise (e.g., running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise) during the preceding month. This variable is based on a different question from those used to assess meeting federal physical activity recommendations.

In 2011, the estimated prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 16.5% in Colorado to 47.3% in Puerto Rico (median: 26.2%) (Table 40). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 11.1% in Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado, to 40.7% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 25.1%) (Table 41). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 10.6% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 36.7% in Wyandotte County, Kansas, and Dakota County, Nebraska (median: 23.8%) (Table 42).

Always Wearing a Seatbelt

If a participant reported that he or she always wore a seatbelt while in an automobile, he or she was considered an all-the-time seatbelt wearer for this report. In 2011, the estimate of always wearing seatbelt among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 63.9% in South Dakota to 94.1% in Oregon (median: 86.3%) (Table 43). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.8% in Spearfish, South Dakota, to 96.9% in Tyler, Texas (median: 86.2%) (Table 44). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.8% in Lawrence County, South Dakota, to 97.0% in San Bernardino County, California, and Washington County, Oregon (median: 86.8%) (Table 45).

Chronic Conditions

Obesity

Obesity was defined as having a body mass index ≥30 among adults aged ≥18 years. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who were obese ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi (median: 27.7%) (Table 46). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.1% in Boulder, Colorado, to 37.2% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 27.3%) (Table 47). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.1% in Boulder County, Colorado, to 41.0% in Thurston County, Nebraska (Median: 26.3%) (Table 48).

Diabetes

Diagnosed diabetes was defined as participants reporting that they had ever been told by a doctor that they had diabetes. Participants reporting gestational diabetes, prediabetes, or borderline diabetes were not considered as having diabetes. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 6.7% in Colorado and Utah to 13.5% in Puerto Rico (median: 9.5%) (Table 49). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.9% in Missoula, Montana, to 15.9% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 9.1%) (Table 50). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.5% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 18.3% in Thurston County, Nebraska (median: 9.0%) (Table 51).

Cancer Survivors

Respondents were defined as having cancer if they had ever been diagnosed with any type of cancer at any point in their lives. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of cancer survivors among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 2.7% in Guam to 14.5% in Florida (median: 11.2%) (Table 52). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.0% in Minot, North Dakota, to 19.6% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 11.1%) (Table 53). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.9% in Prince George´s County, Maryland, to 19.6% in Barnstable County, Massachusetts (median: 10.8%) (Table 54).

Current Asthma

Respondents aged ≥18 years were categorized as currently having asthma if they reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had asthma and still had it at the time of survey participation. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of current asthma ranged from 4.3% in Guam to 12.1% in Maine (median: 9.1%) (Table 55). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.9% in Brookings, South Dakota, to 14.1% in Augusta-Waterville, Maine, and Springfield, Massachusetts (median: 8.8%) (Table 56). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.9% in Brookings County, South Dakota, to 15.6% in Cleveland County, Oklahoma (median: 8.7%) (Table 57).

Arthritis

Arthritis was defined as respondents aged ≥18 years reporting having had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia among adults aged ≥18 years. Arthritis diagnoses included rheumatism, polymyalgia rheumatica, osteoarthritis (not osteoporosis), tendonitis, bursitis, bunions, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or joint infection. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of arthritis ranged from 10.6% in Guam to 35.9% in West Virginia (median: 24.4%) (Table 58). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.5% in Lawrence, Kansas, to 37.0% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 24.3%) (Table 59). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.5% in Douglas County, Kansas, to 35.3% in Horry County, South Carolina (median: 23.8%) (Table 60).

Depression

Depression among participants was defined as having ever been told by a health professional that the participants have a depressive disorder, which includes depression, major depression, dysthymia, or minor depression among adults aged ≥18 years. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of depression ranged from 7.6% in Guam to 24.4% in Maine (median: 17.5%) (Table 61). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.1% in Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California, to 28.5% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 17.8%) (Table 62). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.6% in Fort Bend County, Texas, to 28.3% in Penobscot County, Maine (median: 17.6%) (Table 63).

Cardiovascular Conditions

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure was defined as participants (aged ≥18 years excluding pregnant women) reporting ever having been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional they had high blood pressure. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of high blood pressure ranged from 22.5% in Guam to 41.3% in Alabama (median: 31.6%) (Table 64). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 20.0% in Boulder, Colorado, to 47.6% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 31.5%) (Table 65). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 20.0% in Boulder County, Colorado, and Douglas County, Colorado, to 44.1% in Orangeburg County, South Carolina (median: 30.9%) (Table 66).

High Blood Cholesterol

Adults aged ≥20 years were categorized as having high blood cholesterol if, after having their cholesterol checked, they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that it was high. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of high blood cholesterol ranged from 33.6% in Guam to 42.9% in Mississippi (median: 38.9%) (Table 67). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 22.2% in Brookings, South Dakota, to 47.2% in Monroe, Louisiana (median: 37.6%) (Table 68). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 22.2% in Brookings County, South Dakota, to 48.9% in Aroostook County, Maine (median: 37.3%) (Table 69).

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were identified as having coronary heart disease if they reported that they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had a heart attack (myocardial infarction) or angina. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 7.1% in Colorado to 16.2% in Puerto Rico (median: 10.9%) (Table 70). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.0% in Boulder, Colorado, to 19.4% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 10.8%) (Table 71). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.9% in Dakota County, Minnesota, to 18.5% in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, and Eastland County, Texas (median: 10.3%) (Table 72).

Stroke

Respondents were identified as having had a stroke if they reported that they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had a stroke. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 3.0% in Puerto Rico to 7.2% in Alabama (median: 4.8%) (Table 73). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.4% in Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois, to 10.2% in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (median: 4.7%) (Table 74). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.1% in Monmouth County, New Jersey, to 8.4% in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana (median: 4.4%) (Table 75).

Disability

Activity Limitation

Respondents were asked if they were limited in any way in performing any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of limited activities among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 16.7% in Guam to 31.4% in West Virginia (median: 23.6%) (Table 76). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.9% in Kapaa, Hawaii, to 36.3% in Lewiston, Idaho-Washington (median: 23.6%) (Table 77). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.0% in Fort Bend County, Texas, to 34.2% in Lewis and Clark County, Montana (median: 23.2%) (Table 78).

Use of Special Equipment

Respondents were asked if they currently had any health problem that required them to use special equipment (e.g., a cane, a wheelchair, a special bed, or a special telephone), which included occasional use or use in certain circumstances. In 2011, the estimated prevalence of using special equipment because of any health problem among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 5.1% in Guam to 11.3% in Kentucky and West Virginia (median: 7.9%) (Table 79). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.9% in Fairbanks, Alaska, to 13.2% in Mobile, Alabama (median: 7.8%) (Table 80). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.4% in Dakota County, Minnesota, to 14.7% in Thurston County, Nebraska (median: 7.4%) (Table 81).

A summary of prevalence estimates for 2011 for each selected BRFSS measure is presented by median and ranges by states/territories, MMSAs, and counties (Table 82).

Discussion

Notable changes in BRFSS over time have included the telephone survey design and preparation of data for release. The 2011 survey was the first time cellular telephone interviews were included in the survey. The inclusion of cellular telephone interviews and the adoption of new statistical weighting methodology in 2011 has maintained survey validity and improved the representativeness of data collected by BRFSS. Because of the change in the weighting methodology and the inclusion of cellular telephone respondents, some changes have been made to the prevalence estimates, especially for certain variables (18); therefore, users should not compare 2011 prevalence estimates with those from previous years, or conduct a trend analysis from previous years, but instead use 2011 results as a baseline to compare with subsequent survey results.

In recent years, the use of cellular telephones has increased substantially. Research suggests 31.6% of U.S. homes had only cellular telephones during the first half of 2011, and this percentage continued to increase (18). The difference in demographic characteristics is also noted in households using only cellular telephones. For instance, younger adults, men, adults living in poverty, and Hispanics tend to live in households using cellular telephones only (18). To resolve selection bias and survey validity issues resulting from undercoverage, BRFSS survey methodology was adjusted by including participants using cellular telephones only. Incorporating cellular- and landline-collected interview data into a dual-frame survey has improved the representativeness of the BRFSS survey by ensuring more coverage of persons with any type of phone (10).

In addition to including cellular telephone interviews in the BRFSS data collection, a new weighting methodology called "raking" replaced post stratification in 2011. Poststratification had required knowing the proportion of the weighting variable. Raking, a more-complex weighting procedure, overcame this requirement and is used to adjust for noncoverage and nonresponse in the survey respondent population to predetermined proportions of age, sex, race and ethnicity, and regions (19). Raking allows the use of additional demographic variables and can match more accurately the sample distributions to known population demographic characteristics. This technique reduces potential selection bias and ultimately improves representativeness by introducing more demographic variables including education level, marital status, and home ownership status. Raking fits a dual-frame survey design, which includes landline-telephone only, cellular-telephone only, and combined landline telephone and cellular telephone. The technical change of weighting method has been documented for BRFSS users on the BRFSS webpage (20).

The findings in this report indicate substantial geographic variations in the estimated prevalence of health-care coverage and access, use of preventive care, health-risk behaviors, and chronic conditions among adults in the United States at the levels of state and territory, MMSA, and county. These variations from the crude estimates might reflect the differences in demographic characteristics, socioeconomic and cultural contexts, health-care use and spending, state laws, and local ordinances, or combinations of these factors. The estimated prevalences are useful to local public health advisors and health policy makers in tracking disease estimates, setting priorities in addressing public health needs at various levels, identifying obstacles to health-care access and use, monitoring high-risk behaviors, and implementing prevention programs and policies. The prevalences in this report were direct estimates and were not based on models; therefore, the results might differ somewhat compared with those based on models from other resources (22).

Health Status Indicators

BRFSS uses self-reported general health status, which has been validated as an independent predictor of mortality (23). In this report, the median value of state- and local-level participants reporting not having good or better health was approximately 18%, indicating a limit in daily functional ability (24). In 2011, the median prevalence for adults aged <65 years at the same state- and local-level reporting that they had health-care coverage was approximately 80%. Those lacking health-care coverage were less likely to receive preventive treatments and screenings and, therefore, faced greater risk for advanced-stage cancer diagnosis and death from uncontrolled chronic diseases, trauma, or other acute conditions (25,26).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

A routine checkup and its associated screenings might reveal the presence of a disease or other health problem when it still is in its early stages and is most likely to be treated successfully (27). In 2011, the median prevalence of having received a routine physical checkup among adults, at the state or local level, is approximately 66%. In addition to geographic variation, access to health care can vary by racial background of residents and socioeconomic factors such as education and income level (28).

Influenza Vaccination

For the elderly, influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are especially important because these infections can increase morbidity and mortality (29,30), and their associated risks can be lowered by vaccinations (31,32). In 2011, the median prevalence of having received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months or a pneumococcal vaccination ever among adults aged ≥65 was approximately 61% and 71%, respectively. The estimation was based on data collected in 2011, which might be different from season-specific vaccination coverage. CDC recommendations and guidelines are available on how to promote adult vaccinations; strategies include patient and provider reminder programs and improvements in health-care access and vaccination practice, including assessment, administration, and other measures (33).

Physical Activity

Regular physical activity can help persons maintain a healthy body weight, strengthen bones and muscles, improve mental health and mood, and reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, and some cancers (34). In 2011, physical activity variables were derived in the BRFSS survey to follow 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (35), which recommend aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity and muscle strengthening. Data from the 2011 BRFSS show that the median prevalences of meeting federal physical activity recommendations were approximately 52% and 32% for moderate and vigorous aerobic physical activities, respectively, and 30% for muscle strengthening activities alone. In addition to measuring physical activity level, BRFSS also includes a question regarding no leisure-time physical activity. The median prevalence of having no leisure-time physical activity at state level was 26.2%. The results further indicate geographic discrepancies in prevalence estimates. To address these discrepancies, states and local communities can help more of their residents meet these recommendations using strategies such as those recommended in the Community Guide (36).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Cigarette Smoking

Tobacco use results in approximately 5 million deaths worldwide per year, yet it is the single-most preventable cause of disease and death (37). In the United States, the prevalence of current cigarette smoking has declined significantly from 20.9% in 2005 to 19.3% in 2010, although the decline was not consistent on a year-to-year basis (38). In 2011, approximately 20% of adults (median prevalence at state or local level) reported they were current smokers and had ever smoked at least 100 cigarettes. The findings underscore the need for tobacco-control efforts to continue and even to be enhanced so the prevalence of cigarette smoking can be lowered in more areas.

Excessive Alcohol Use

Excessive alcohol use, including binge and heavy drinking, is the third-leading preventable cause of death in the United States (39). In 2011, the median prevalences of binge and heavy drinking were approximately 18% and 7%, respectively, at state and local levels. This finding suggests that excessive alcohol use among adult U.S. residents can be addressed with effective collaboration between federal, state, and community agencies (40).

Unintentional Injuries

Accidents (unintentional injuries) are the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States (1); motor vehicle crashes are one of the leading causes of unintentional injury death. An estimated 33,783 persons died in motor vehicle crashes in 2011 in the United States (41). The findings in this report indicate that many persons do not wear seatbelts while driving or riding in a vehicle, and there is great variation across states, making some populations at increased risk for crash-related injury or death. To help protect persons from injuries caused from motor vehicle crashes, CDC recommends implementation of evidence-based interventions such as ones identified by the Task Force for Community Preventive Services, including primary enforcement of seatbelt laws and enhanced enforcement programs (42).

Chronic Conditions and Disability

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic health condition as well as a risk factor for other chronic conditions. Based on participants' measured weight and height, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 revealed that the prevalence of age adjusted obesity was 33.5% among adult men and 36.1% among adult women (44). Obesity is caused by many factors, including genetics, metabolism, behavior, environment, and socioeconomic status, but environmental and behavioral factors are two main contributors (45). The median prevalence of self-reported obesity in this report was approximately 28% at the state or local level; however, self-reported obesity was approximately 28% at the state or local level. Self-reported obesity prevalence tends to be underestimated (46).

Diabetes

Diabetes is another critical chronic condition that is associated with many health problems (47). In 2011, the median prevalence of self-reported diabetes was 9.5% at the state level. Because BRFSS did not include undiagnosed diabetes, the actual prevalence might be higher. By 2012 in the United States, 29.1 million persons aged ≥20 years have had undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes; approximately 27.8% of persons with diabetes are undiagnosed (48). Although treatment and care are important for persons already living with diabetes, effective preventive strategies need to be undertaken, especially among groups at high risk for developing type II diabetes.

Cancer

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States (1). By 2011, approximately 13.4 million persons in the United States had survived cancer (49,50). Cancer survivors had 14% higher risks for developing a new malignancy (51) and were more susceptible to other chronic conditions (52) compared with those who never had cancer. In 2011, the median prevalence of cancer survivors was approximately 11% at the state or local level.

Asthma

The number of persons with current asthma increased by 2.9% each year from 2001 to 2010, reaching 25.7 million in 2010, of whom 72.8% were adults (53). In 2011, the median prevalence of current asthma was 9% at the state or local level. No cure exists for asthma, but the symptoms often can be controlled by taking medicines, getting self-management education, and avoiding exposure to asthma triggers (54). To improve asthma management, high-risk populations should be identified for targeted prevention programs.

Arthritis

During 2010 and 2012, approximately 52.5 million (22.7%) adults aged ≥18 years had self-reported they had been diagnosed with arthritis, and 22.7 million had arthritis-attributable activity limitation (55). In 2011, the median prevalence of diagnosed arthritis was approximately 24% at the state or local level. Arthritis often can be controlled and managed by medication, maintaining healthy body weight, and by being physically active.

Depression

Depression is a health condition, often unrecognized, that might be correlated with other chronic conditions and risk behaviors. Mental health problems were most common in smokers (56), and those with mental health issues were at increased risk for having high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol (57). In 2011, the median prevalence of having had any depressive disorder including major depression, dysthymia, and minor depression at the state or local level was approximately 17%.

Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States (1) and contributed to approximately 24.2% of total deaths in the United States in 2010 (58). Stroke can cause serious long-term disability (59) and is the fourth-leading cause of death in the United States (1). In 2011, the median prevalence of having had coronary heart disease and stroke among adults aged ≥45 years was 10.9% and 4.8%, respectively, at the state level. High blood pressure and high blood cholesterol are the two primary risk factors for both coronary heart disease and stroke (60). Many factors can increase the risk for developing high blood pressure and having a high blood cholesterol level, particularly a family history of the diseases, being an older person, being of black descent, having diabetes, consuming a diet high in sodium, being overweight and physically inactive, using tobacco, and using alcohol excessively (61). In 2011, the median prevalence of high blood pressure was approximately 31% and high blood cholesterol among adults aged ≥20 years was approximately 38% at the state or local level. High blood pressure and cholesterol can be prevented or controlled by eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, quitting smoking, limiting alcohol use, managing diabetes, monitoring blood pressure, getting a blood test, and taking medications as needed.

Disability

Approximately 56.6 million persons in the United States have a disability, and 38.3 million of these have a serious disability (62). Persons with disabilities also had higher rates of emergency department use and hospitalization, yet they had more problems with health-care access than those without disabilities (63). Because of their vulnerabilities from their physical condition, persons with disabilities might face many challenges in accessing health care. In 2011, the median prevalence of using special equipment for any health problem at a state or local level was 7%. As the nation's population continues to age, persons with disabilities will require additional attention to optimize health and daily coping strategies.

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least four limitations. First, BRFSS results might not be generalizable to the entire U.S. population. The BRFSS survey design excludes persons from institutions, nursing homes, long-term care facilities, military installations, and correctional institutions. Because BRFSS is conducted by telephone interview, it excludes persons who do not have telephones for personal use. Second, although BRFSS is conducted in several languages other than English (i.e., Spanish, Mandarin, and Portuguese), the survey does not apply to persons who speak other languages only. Third, because of the small sample size or unreliable estimates, the prevalence of certain variables could not be obtained at certain MMSA or county levels. Finally, because BRFSS data are self-reported, information is subject to recall bias and, as with all surveys, potential for bias exists from question wording or order. However, the major improvement of 2011 BRFSS—which involved including survey data from participants using cellular telephones in addition to landline telephone-collected data—increases the representativeness and accuracy.

Overall, BRFSS is a cost-effective, timely, and flexible survey that provides reliable estimates of health status, health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, disabilities, and access to preventive services at state and local levels. Although different surveys use different sampling frames and data collection modes, BRFSS was compared with other surveys and its prevalence estimates were consistent with other national survey databases (64,65), and the validity and reliability have been tested (9). BRFSS is the only source of large data sets available to many state health departments and local communities to assess health conditions and to track progress of health promotion programs and strategies in a timely and accurate way (66).

Conclusion

The results in this report suggest the importance of continuing to monitor high-risk behaviors and chronic conditions and increase the use of vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal diseases at state and local levels. Reducing unhealthy behaviors, adopting a healthy lifestyle, and increasing awareness of health promotion strategies could help prevent or control chronic conditions. BRFSS continues to serve as an important data source to help state and local health departments identify emerging public health problems and help states and local communities implement health prevention programs and strategies that help decrease morbidity and mortality risk.

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TABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

7,662

76.8

0.7

(75.5–78.1)

Alaska

3,526

84.5

0.9

(82.7–86.3)

Arizona

6,400

82.6

0.9

(80.8–84.3)

Arkansas

4,715

75.1

1.0

(73.2–77.0)

California

17,991

81.3

0.4

(80.5–82.1)

Colorado

13,549

86.2

0.5

(85.3–87.1)

Connecticut

6,779

85.1

0.6

(83.9–86.4)

Delaware

4,773

85.4

0.7

(84.0–86.7)

District of Columbia

4,522

86.3

0.8

(84.8–87.8)

Florida

12,335

79.4

0.6

(78.2–80.5)

Georgia

9,936

81.1

0.6

(80.0–82.2)

Hawaii

7,587

85.0

0.6

(83.8–86.2)

Idaho

6,048

84.6

0.7

(83.2–85.9)

Illinois

5,473

82.6

0.8

(81.1–84.1)

Indiana

8,451

81.1

0.6

(80.0–82.3)

Iowa

7,339

87.0

0.5

(86.1–88.0)

Kansas

20,663

85.0

0.3

(84.4–85.6)

Kentucky

10,849

77.6

0.6

(76.4–78.8)

Louisiana

10,893

77.0

0.6

(75.8–78.3)

Maine

13,169

84.1

0.4

(83.2–84.9)

Maryland

10,090

85.8

0.6

(84.7–86.9)

Massachusetts

22,253

86.0

0.4

(85.2–86.7)

Michigan

11,037

82.8

0.5

(81.7–83.8)

Minnesota

15,366

88.0

0.4

(87.2–88.7)

Mississippi

8,881

76.0

0.6

(74.8–77.2)

Missouri

6,385

81.8

0.6

(80.6–83.1)

Montana

10,229

82.8

0.6

(81.6–83.9)

Nebraska

25,347

85.7

0.3

(85.1–86.3)

Nevada

5,466

79.8

1.0

(77.8–81.7)

New Hampshire

6,307

86.3

0.6

(85.2–87.4)

New Jersey

15,322

83.8

0.4

(83.0–84.6)

New Mexico

9,398

80.1

0.5

(79.1–81.2)

New York

7,675

83.1

0.6

(82.0–84.3)

North Carolina

11,495

80.4

0.6

(79.3–81.6)

North Dakota

5,280

85.3

0.6

(84.1–86.5)

Ohio

9,913

82.0

0.5

(80.9–83.0)

Oklahoma

8,487

79.8

0.6

(78.6–81.0)

Oregon

6,224

82.4

0.7

(81.1–83.7)

Pennsylvania

11,451

83.3

0.5

(82.3–84.2)

Rhode Island

6,471

82.6

0.6

(81.3–83.8)

South Carolina

12,865

80.9

0.5

(79.9–81.9)

South Dakota

8,250

85.4

0.7

(84.0–86.7)

Tennessee

5,888

79.1

1.1

(76.9–81.2)

Texas

14,883

81.0

0.6

(79.9–82.1)

Utah

12,619

86.6

0.4

(85.8–87.4)

Vermont

7,029

87.1

0.5

(86.1–88.1)

Virginia

6,582

83.2

0.6

(82.0–84.5)

Washington

14,730

83.9

0.5

(82.9–84.8)

West Virginia

5,268

74.9

0.7

(73.5–76.3)

Wisconsin

5,293

85.4

0.7

(84.0–86.9)

Wyoming

6,837

84.6

0.6

(83.4–85.9)

Guam

1,873

81.7

1.1

(79.5–83.9)

Puerto Rico

6,601

65.5

0.7

(64.2–66.9)

Median

82.8

Range

65.5–88.0

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.


TABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Abbeville, Louisiana

513

80.3

2.6

(75.3–85.3)

Aberdeen, South Dakota

546

79.8

2.8

(74.3–85.4)

Akron, Ohio

785

81.0

2.1

(76.9–85.0)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

3,241

83.7

0.8

(82.1–85.4)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

1,149

84.4

1.7

(81.1–87.7)

Anchorage, Alaska

1,259

83.9

1.5

(80.9–86.9)

Asheville, North Carolina

573

82.0

2.1

(77.9–86.2)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

4,009

84.0

0.9

(82.3–85.7)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

1,071

81.9

1.7

(78.5–85.2)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

1,226

79.9

2.0

(76.0–83.7)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

1,104

82.0

1.6

(79.0–85.1)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

1,293

88.0

1.5

(85.2–90.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,640

84.3

0.9

(82.6–86.0)

Bangor, Maine

1,187

81.2

1.5

(78.2–84.2)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

518

87.1

1.9

(83.4–90.8)

Barre, Vermont

669

87.1

1.8

(83.6–90.7)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,115

81.1

1.4

(78.3–83.9)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland

1,811

90.4

1.1

(88.2–92.6)

Billings, Montana

1,149

82.5

1.6

(79.4–85.7)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,473

78.8

1.4

(76.0–81.6)

Bismarck, North Dakota

969

86.3

1.4

(83.7–89.0)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,525

87.9

1.0

(85.9–89.9)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts

6,036

86.0

0.7

(84.5–87.4)

Boulder, Colorado

594

87.8

2.2

(83.6–92.1)

Bozeman, Montana

587

90.8

1.5

(87.9–93.8)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

1,635

86.4

1.2

(84.1–88.8)

Brookings, South Dakota

500

92.4

1.4

(89.7–95.2)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

501

85.3

2.0

(81.4–89.1)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

2,109

90.0

0.8

(88.3–91.6)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts

4,298

90.1

0.6

(88.8–91.3)

Camden, New Jersey

2,087

84.8

1.1

(82.6–87.0)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

710

81.8

2.2

(77.5–86.2)

Casper, Wyoming

857

81.5

1.9

(77.8–85.1)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

710

87.7

1.6

(84.5–90.8)

Charleston, West Virginia

981

72.6

1.7

(69.2–76.0)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,654

82.5

1.4

(79.8–85.2)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,878

83.6

1.1

(81.4–85.9)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

619

76.5

3.0

(70.6–82.5)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

1,117

85.7

1.4

(82.9–88.4)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

3,784

82.2

0.9

(80.4–84.1)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,906

85.1

1.0

(83.0–87.1)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,170

81.8

1.4

(79.0–84.5)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,401

86.2

1.3

(83.6–88.7)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,685

81.1

1.4

(78.4–83.9)

Columbus, Nebraska

603

84.8

1.7

(81.5–88.2)

Columbus, Ohio

1,432

82.9

1.6

(79.8–86.0)

Concord, New Hampshire

712

85.6

1.7

(82.2–89.0)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas

821

85.2

1.5

(82.2–88.1)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois

518

88.1

3.0

(82.1–94.0)

Dayton, Ohio

803

81.0

2.0

(77.0–85.0)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

5,741

85.9

0.7

(84.6–87.3)

Des Moines - West Des Moines, Iowa

1,264

87.4

1.1

(85.1–89.6)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan

1,877

78.4

1.5

(75.6–81.3)

Dover, Delaware

1,414

84.0

1.3

(81.5–86.5)

Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin

678

86.2

1.9

(82.5–89.8)

Durham, North Carolina

966

83.9

2.1

(79.7–88.1)

Edison, New Jersey

2,882

86.3

0.8

(84.6–87.9)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

653

81.8

2.4

(77.1–86.6)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

553

78.3

2.2

(74.0–82.6)

Fairbanks, Alaska

559

88.4

1.7

(85.0–91.8)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

1,065

87.9

1.3

(85.3–90.5)

Farmington, New Mexico

747

79.5

2.2

(75.2–83.8)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

779

83.7

2.0

(79.8–87.7)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

676

89.2

1.7

(85.9–92.5)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

545

83.7

1.9

(80.0–87.4)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

680

82.8

1.9

(79.2–86.5)

Grand Island, Nebraska

1,023

81.2

1.6

(78.0–84.4)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

890

86.0

2.1

(81.8–90.2)

Great Falls, Montana

707

82.5

2.0

(78.6–86.5)

Greeley, Colorado

559

87.0

2.1

(82.9–91.2)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

1,080

79.9

2.2

(75.6–84.3)

Greenville, South Carolina

1,232

84.4

1.3

(81.8–87.0)

Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi

513

77.3

2.2

(72.9–81.6)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

697

86.1

1.6

(82.9–89.2)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

2,617

86.5

1.0

(84.6–88.4)

Hastings, Nebraska

685

82.6

1.9

(78.8–86.4)

Havre, Montana

560

80.3

2.4

(75.7–85.0)

Heber, Utah

500

87.4

2.4

(82.7–92.2)

Helena, Montana

767

83.7

1.8

(80.2–87.2)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

575

75.3

2.8

(69.8–80.8)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,472

82.9

1.6

(79.9–86.0)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

1,006

89.1

1.2

(86.7–91.4)

Honolulu, Hawaii

3,821

85.7

0.8

(84.2–87.2)

Houma-Bayou Cane-Thibodaux, Louisiana

544

77.1

2.4

(72.5–81.8)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,769

82.8

1.0

(80.7–84.8)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

747

76.5

2.0

(72.5–80.5)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

501

82.8

2.9

(77.1–88.5)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

1,981

82.8

1.0

(80.8–84.9)

Jackson, Mississippi

944

77.6

1.7

(74.2–81.0)

Jacksonville, Florida

974

79.8

2.0

(75.9–83.7)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,623

85.5

1.2

(83.1–87.8)

Kalispell, Montana

710

83.4

1.8

(79.9–86.8)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

6,769

84.4

0.8

(82.8–86.0)

Kapaa, Hawaii

671

82.1

2.4

(77.3–86.9)

Kearney, Nebraska

616

87.5

1.6

(84.3–90.6)

Keene, New Hampshire

518

88.0

1.9

(84.4–91.7)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

626

72.0

3.6

(64.9–79.0)

Knoxville, Tennessee

559

84.7

2.6

(79.7–89.7)

Lafayette, Louisiana

549

81.8

2.4

(77.1–86.4)

Lake Charles, Louisiana

654

77.3

2.3

(72.8–81.8)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

738

78.3

2.1

(74.2–82.3)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

2,205

80.7

1.2

(78.2–83.1)

Lawrence, Kansas

769

89.6

1.4

(86.9–92.3)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,559

87.5

1.1

(85.3–89.7)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

500

74.9

4.1

(66.8–83.0)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

838

85.0

1.5

(82.0–88.0)

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

523

83.7

1.9

(79.9–87.5)

Lincoln, Nebraska

2,825

88.5

0.7

(87.1–89.9)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

990

77.0

2.1

(72.8–81.2)

Logan, Utah-Idaho

549

87.4

2.1

(83.2–91.5)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California

3,206

78.6

1.0

(76.7–80.5)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

2,609

82.4

1.2

(79.9–84.8)

Lubbock, Texas

771

85.7

2.1

(81.5–89.8)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,586

87.3

1.0

(85.4–89.3)

Manhattan, Kansas

762

91.0

1.1

(88.8–93.3)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

1,200

81.3

2.4

(76.6–86.1)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

1,428

79.3

1.4

(76.6–82.0)

Midland, Texas

543

86.5

2.4

(81.8–91.2)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

1,356

84.4

1.7

(81.0–87.8)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

9,721

89.0

0.5

(88.0–89.9)

Minot, North Dakota

536

87.2

1.8

(83.7–90.6)

Missoula, Montana

790

87.1

1.5

(84.1–90.1)

Mobile, Alabama

596

77.9

2.3

(73.4–82.4)

Monroe, Louisiana

510

77.1

2.5

(72.2–81.9)

Montgomery, Alabama

516

76.9

2.4

(72.2–81.6)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

805

79.8

1.8

(76.3–83.4)

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee

856

82.8

2.4

(78.0–87.5)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York

768

87.7

1.6

(84.7–90.8)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania

4,105

83.2

0.9

(81.4–84.9)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,472

82.5

1.5

(79.6–85.5)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

2,090

77.0

1.5

(74.2–79.9)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey

6,693

81.4

0.7

(80.0–82.9)

Norfolk, Nebraska

766

85.6

1.6

(82.4–88.8)

North Platte, Nebraska

664

81.6

1.8

(78.0–85.2)

Ocean City, New Jersey

608

84.0

2.1

(79.8–88.2)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

2,228

87.3

0.9

(85.6–89.0)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,658

82.3

1.0

(80.4–84.2)

Olympia, Washington

496

81.7

2.7

(76.3–87.0)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

6,737

86.4

0.6

(85.3–87.6)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

533

77.6

2.6

(72.5–82.8)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

1,093

78.6

1.9

(75.0–82.3)

Peabody, Massachusetts

2,696

84.9

1.2

(82.5–87.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2,591

83.4

1.0

(81.4–85.4)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

2,041

83.5

1.2

(81.2–85.9)

Pierre, South Dakota

560

85.7

2.9

(79.9–91.4)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,477

83.4

0.9

(81.6–85.2)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

4,317

87.4

0.7

(86.0–88.8)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

3,433

84.9

0.9

(83.2–86.6)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

9,319

82.8

0.6

(81.6–84.0)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,719

87.6

1.1

(85.5–89.8)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

884

87.9

1.5

(85.1–90.8)

Rapid City, South Dakota

1,143

81.0

2.1

(76.9–85.1)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,679

79.8

1.8

(76.3–83.2)

Richmond, Virginia

996

83.5

1.7

(80.2–86.9)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,982

80.7

1.2

(78.2–83.1)

Riverton, Wyoming

503

82.0

2.9

(76.3–87.8)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,675

86.0

1.1

(83.9–88.2)

Rockland, Maine

658

82.6

2.3

(78.2–87.1)

Rutland, Vermont

725

86.1

1.5

(83.1–89.0)

Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville, California

1,280

86.3

1.3

(83.8–88.8)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

2,675

84.5

1.0

(82.6–86.4)

Salem, Oregon

604

80.5

2.4

(75.9–85.2)

Salt Lake City, Utah

5,202

86.5

0.6

(85.3–87.7)

San Antonio, Texas

1,209

81.2

1.8

(77.6–84.8)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,688

84.0

1.4

(81.4–86.7)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

2,309

85.3

1.1

(83.1–87.4)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

879

85.1

2.0

(81.1–89.1)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California

1,345

86.0

1.3

(83.5–88.5)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

804

83.2

1.9

(79.4–87.0)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

881

81.9

1.8

(78.5–85.4)

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

533

81.8

2.3

(77.2–86.4)

Seaford, Delaware

1,330

81.4

1.5

(78.6–84.3)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington

4,217

87.1

0.8

(85.5–88.7)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

609

78.8

2.1

(74.6–83.0)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

1,525

81.2

2.4

(76.4–86.0)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

1,312

85.6

1.7

(82.4–88.9)

Spartanburg, South Carolina

588

82.6

2.0

(78.6–86.6)

Spearfish, South Dakota

533

84.2

2.6

(79.1–89.2)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Spokane, Washington

1,317

84.4

1.7

(81.0–87.8)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,687

83.6

1.0

(81.6–85.6)

Tacoma, Washington

974

83.5

1.7

(80.2–86.8)

Tallahassee, Florida

638

85.4

1.8

(81.8–89.0)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

1,126

78.8

1.6

(75.7–81.9)

Toledo, Ohio

811

82.1

1.8

(78.5–85.7)

Topeka, Kansas

1,911

84.5

0.9

(82.6–86.3)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

625

84.2

2.0

(80.2–88.2)

Tucson, Arizona

834

83.5

1.7

(80.2–86.8)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,393

80.7

1.2

(78.4–83.0)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

542

80.9

2.1

(76.8–84.9)

Tyler, Texas

567

84.0

2.3

(79.4–88.6)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

1,325

82.4

1.6

(79.2–85.6)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,704

85.9

1.1

(83.8–88.0)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia

7,739

88.2

0.7

(86.9–89.6)

Watertown, South Dakota

531

84.4

2.7

(79.0–89.7)

Wichita, Kansas

4,265

83.9

0.7

(82.4–85.3)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey

2,547

86.7

0.9

(84.9–88.4)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,707

83.6

1.1

(81.5–85.7)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

932

77.9

2.4

(73.1–82.7)

Median

83.7

Range

72.0–92.4

Abbreviations: MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Metropolitan division.


TABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

768

79.1

1.9

(75.3–83.0)

Mobile County, Alabama

596

77.9

2.3

(73.4–82.4)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

709

83.8

1.9

(80.1–87.5)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

559

88.4

1.7

(85.0–91.8)

Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska

550

84.5

1.8

(81.0–88.0)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,598

84.0

1.3

(81.5–86.5)

Pima County, Arizona

834

83.5

1.7

(80.2–86.8)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

667

77.4

2.8

(72.0–82.7)

Alameda County, California

743

84.7

1.9

(81.0–88.4)

Contra Costa County, California

580

84.6

2.3

(80.2–89.1)

Los Angeles County, California

3,206

78.6

1.0

(76.7–80.5)

Orange County, California

1,345

86.0

1.3

(83.5–88.5)

Riverside County, California

1,036

81.1

1.9

(77.4–84.8)

Sacramento County, California

749

85.3

1.7

(81.9–88.6)

San Bernardino County, California

946

80.1

1.7

(76.7–83.5)

San Diego County, California

1,688

84.0

1.4

(81.4–86.7)

Santa Clara County, California

834

86.0

2.0

(82.1–89.8)

Adams County, Colorado

993

83.9

1.8

(80.4–87.3)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

1,060

85.1

1.6

(81.9–88.3)

Boulder County, Colorado

594

87.8

2.2

(83.6–92.1)

Denver County, Colorado

1,093

82.2

1.6

(79.0–85.4)

Douglas County, Colorado

685

94.2

1.0

(92.2–96.1)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,233

86.2

1.3

(83.6–88.7)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,397

87.9

1.2

(85.6–90.3)

Larimer County, Colorado

676

89.2

1.7

(85.9–92.5)

Weld County, Colorado

559

87.0

2.1

(82.9–91.2)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,635

86.4

1.2

(84.1–88.8)

Hartford County, Connecticut

2,103

84.6

1.2

(82.2–87.0)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,472

82.6

1.5

(79.6–85.5)

Kent County, Delaware

1,414

84.0

1.3

(81.5–86.5)

New Castle County, Delaware

2,029

87.6

0.9

(85.8–89.4)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,330

81.4

1.5

(78.6–84.3)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

4,522

86.4

0.7

(85.0–87.9)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

708

77.4

2.1

(73.3–81.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

567

85.6

2.2

(81.3–89.8)

Fulton County, Georgia

635

85.5

2.1

(81.5–89.5)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,472

82.9

1.5

(79.9–86.0)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

3,821

85.7

0.8

(84.2–87.2)

Kauai County, Hawaii

671

82.1

2.4

(77.3–86.9)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,623

85.5

1.2

(83.1–87.8)

Ada County, Idaho

848

88.3

1.4

(85.7–91.0)

Canyon County, Idaho

521

87.1

1.8

(83.5–90.6)

Cook County, Illinois

1,606

82.0

1.3

(79.5–84.6)

Lake County, Indiana

885

76.2

2.6

(71.2–81.3)

Marion County, Indiana

1,326

80.5

1.5

(77.6–83.5)

Linn County, Iowa

635

88.2

1.6

(85.0–91.4)

Polk County, Iowa

963

86.9

1.4

(84.2–89.5)

Douglas County, Kansas

769

89.6

1.4

(86.9–92.3)

Johnson County, Kansas

3,340

90.5

0.6

(89.3–91.7)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

3,354

84.5

0.8

(82.8–86.1)

Shawnee County, Kansas

1,320

83.8

1.2

(81.6–86.1)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

1,157

74.8

1.9

(71.2–78.5)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

1,981

83.5

1.6

(80.5–86.6)

Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

592

77.0

2.4

(72.4–81.6)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

624

84.1

1.8

(80.6–87.5)

Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

513

80.3

2.6

(75.3–85.3)

Androscoggin County, Maine

838

85.0

1.5

(82.0–88.0)

Aroostook County, Maine

742

80.4

1.8

(77.0–83.9)

Cumberland County, Maine

2,254

88.7

0.9

(86.9–90.5)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Franklin County, Maine

510

81.4

2.8

(75.8–86.9)

Hancock County, Maine

600

85.4

1.9

(81.8–89.0)

Kennebec County, Maine

1,104

82.1

1.5

(79.0–85.1)

Knox County, Maine

658

82.6

2.3

(78.2–87.1)

Lincoln County, Maine

644

85.3

1.9

(81.6–89.0)

Oxford County, Maine

548

80.6

2.0

(76.7–84.5)

Penobscot County, Maine

1,187

81.2

1.5

(78.2–84.2)

Waldo County, Maine

610

84.3

1.9

(80.6–87.9)

Washington County, Maine

624

77.9

2.1

(73.7–82.1)

York County, Maine

1,573

86.0

1.1

(83.8–88.2)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

702

88.1

1.4

(85.3–90.9)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,089

83.8

1.6

(80.6–86.9)

Frederick County, Maryland

590

88.3

1.8

(84.8–91.8)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,221

91.0

1.3

(88.5–93.6)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

947

86.7

1.6

(83.6–89.8)

Baltimore city, Maryland

646

76.0

2.4

(71.3–80.7)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

518

87.1

1.9

(83.4–90.8)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

2,848

83.5

1.3

(81.0–86.1)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,696

84.9

1.2

(82.5–87.3)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

2,073

82.2

1.2

(79.8–84.6)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

4,298

90.1

0.6

(88.8–91.3)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

1,819

90.3

1.0

(88.3–92.3)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

1,910

83.5

1.6

(80.4–86.7)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

2,307

84.0

1.2

(81.6–86.3)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,707

83.6

1.1

(81.5–85.7)

Kent County, Michigan

753

86.9

2.4

(82.2–91.6)

Oakland County, Michigan

915

87.3

1.4

(84.6–90.1)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,877

78.4

1.5

(75.6–81.3)

Anoka County, Minnesota

727

88.7

1.5

(85.8–91.5)

Dakota County, Minnesota

877

90.5

1.3

(88.1–93.0)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

4,142

88.9

0.7

(87.4–90.3)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

2,271

88.3

1.1

(86.2–90.5)

St. Louis County, Minnesota

531

87.5

1.9

(83.8–91.2)

Washington County, Minnesota

536

90.6

1.8

(87.0–94.1)

Jackson County, Missouri

676

80.8

1.9

(77.2–84.5)

St. Louis County, Missouri

697

85.3

1.7

(81.9–88.7)

St. Louis city, Missouri

533

82.0

2.1

(77.9–86.0)

Cascade County, Montana

707

82.6

2.0

(78.6–86.5)

Flathead County, Montana

710

83.4

1.8

(79.9–86.8)

Gallatin County, Montana

587

90.9

1.5

(87.9–93.8)

Hill County, Montana

560

80.3

2.4

(75.7–85.0)

Lake County, Montana

899

79.1

2.1

(74.9–83.3)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

653

82.5

2.0

(78.6–86.5)

Missoula County, Montana

790

87.1

1.5

(84.1–90.1)

Yellowstone County, Montana

1,028

82.3

1.7

(78.9–85.6)

Adams County, Nebraska

560

82.6

2.2

(78.3–86.9)

Buffalo County, Nebraska

518

86.6

1.8

(83.1–90.1)

Dakota County, Nebraska

929

78.1

3.2

(71.9–84.3)

Douglas County, Nebraska

4,396

86.3

0.7

(85.0–87.7)

Hall County, Nebraska

730

79.5

1.9

(75.8–83.3)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

2,521

88.6

0.7

(87.2–90.1)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

637

80.9

1.9

(77.1–84.7)

Madison County, Nebraska

518

85.4

2.0

(81.5–89.4)

Platte County, Nebraska

603

84.8

1.7

(81.5–88.2)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

1,166

88.5

1.2

(86.1–90.9)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

861

81.1

1.9

(77.5–84.8)

Thurston County, Nebraska

528

78.3

3.0

(72.5–84.2)

Clark County, Nevada

2,205

80.7

1.3

(78.2–83.2)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,646

79.8

1.8

(76.3–83.3)

Cheshire County, New Hampshire

518

88.0

1.9

(84.4–91.7)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

498

89.0

1.6

(85.7–92.2)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,586

87.3

1.0

(85.4–89.3)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

712

85.6

1.7

(82.2–89.0)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,045

87.1

1.3

(84.6–89.5)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

630

83.8

2.1

(79.6–88.1)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

1,071

81.9

1.7

(78.5–85.2)

Bergen County, New Jersey

884

86.0

1.6

(83.0–89.1)

Burlington County, New Jersey

707

87.9

1.5

(85.0–90.9)

Camden County, New Jersey

802

81.0

2.1

(76.8–85.2)

Cape May County, New Jersey

608

84.0

2.1

(79.8–88.2)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,369

79.8

1.4

(77.0–82.6)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

578

85.6

2.0

(81.7–89.6)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,271

77.0

1.6

(73.9–80.2)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

580

92.2

1.4

(89.5–94.9)

Mercer County, New Jersey

625

84.2

2.0

(80.2–88.2)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

847

83.7

1.7

(80.3–87.1)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

719

86.9

1.6

(83.7–90.0)

Morris County, New Jersey

833

89.7

1.6

(86.6–92.8)

Ocean County, New Jersey

661

85.9

1.6

(82.7–89.1)

Passaic County, New Jersey

628

77.6

2.4

(72.9–82.3)

Somerset County, New Jersey

655

91.6

1.2

(89.2–94.0)

Sussex County, New Jersey

576

88.4

1.8

(84.9–91.9)

Union County, New Jersey

696

80.0

2.1

(75.9–84.0)

Warren County, New Jersey

572

85.1

2.0

(81.1–89.0)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,918

83.7

1.0

(81.7–85.7)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

738

78.3

2.1

(74.3–82.3)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

734

85.8

1.6

(82.6–89.0)

San Juan County, New Mexico

747

79.5

2.2

(75.2–83.8)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

804

83.2

1.9

(79.4–87.0)

Valencia County, New Mexico

507

79.5

2.2

(75.1–83.9)

Kings County, New York

1,024

82.0

1.5

(79.1–84.8)

New York County, New York

1,052

84.8

1.5

(81.8–87.9)

Queens County, New York

790

79.7

2.0

(75.9–83.6)

Durham County, North Carolina

535

83.7

2.9

(78.0–89.5)

Guilford County, North Carolina

635

82.8

2.4

(78.0–87.6)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

685

84.6

1.7

(81.3–87.9)

Wake County, North Carolina

573

88.5

1.7

(85.2–91.7)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

696

87.3

1.6

(84.2–90.5)

Cass County, North Dakota

942

88.7

1.3

(86.2–91.3)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

751

82.0

1.8

(78.6–85.5)

Franklin County, Ohio

720

82.6

2.1

(78.4–86.7)

Hamilton County, Ohio

723

86.3

1.5

(83.4–89.1)

Lucas County, Ohio

660

78.2

2.4

(73.5–82.9)

Mahoning County, Ohio

658

80.4

3.2

(74.2–86.6)

Montgomery County, Ohio

663

79.9

2.4

(75.2–84.5)

Stark County, Ohio

672

81.3

2.4

(76.6–85.9)

Summit County, Ohio

677

80.9

2.2

(76.5–85.3)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

498

86.6

1.9

(83.0–90.3)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,499

81.0

1.3

(78.4–83.5)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,721

80.7

1.4

(78.0–83.4)

Clackamas County, Oregon

558

84.4

2.0

(80.4–88.4)

Lane County, Oregon

653

81.8

2.4

(77.1–86.6)

Multnomah County, Oregon

1,082

84.6

1.5

(81.6–87.5)

Washington County, Oregon

712

87.1

1.8

(83.6–90.5)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

1,388

83.5

1.2

(81.1–85.9)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,469

76.9

1.6

(73.7–80.1)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Kent County, Rhode Island

973

86.3

1.3

(83.8–88.9)

Providence County, Rhode Island

3,940

79.9

0.9

(78.1–81.7)

Washington County, Rhode Island

790

87.9

1.3

(85.3–90.5)

Aiken County, South Carolina

612

80.9

2.0

(77.0–84.7)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

854

89.1

1.3

(86.6–91.7)

Charleston County, South Carolina

962

86.0

1.7

(82.7–89.2)

Greenville County, South Carolina

861

85.3

1.5

(82.3–88.3)

Horry County, South Carolina

805

79.9

1.8

(76.3–83.4)

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

533

77.6

2.6

(72.5–82.8)

Richland County, South Carolina

907

82.4

1.8

(78.9–85.9)

Spartanburg County, South Carolina

588

82.6

2.0

(78.6–86.6)

Brookings County, South Dakota

500

92.4

1.4

(89.7–95.2)

Brown County, South Dakota

526

80.2

2.9

(74.5–85.9)

Codington County, South Dakota

508

82.9

3.1

(76.9–89.0)

Hughes County, South Dakota

539

86.3

2.6

(81.2–91.3)

Lawrence County, South Dakota

533

84.2

2.6

(79.1–89.2)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

771

84.3

2.0

(80.4–88.3)

Pennington County, South Dakota

650

80.6

2.5

(75.8–85.5)

Bexar County, Texas

1,048

81.3

2.1

(77.3–85.3)

Eastland County, Texas

607

81.9

3.5

(75.1–88.8)

Fort Bend County, Texas

940

89.1

1.9

(85.5–92.8)

Harris County, Texas

1,490

82.6

1.3

(80.1–85.1)

Lubbock County, Texas

753

85.8

2.1

(81.6–90.0)

Midland County, Texas

543

86.5

2.4

(81.8–91.2)

Smith County, Texas

567

84.0

2.3

(79.4–88.6)

Tarrant County, Texas

569

83.2

2.0

(79.2–87.2)

Travis County, Texas

1,042

90.6

1.3

(88.0–93.1)

Davis County, Utah

1,166

89.7

1.0

(87.8–91.6)

Salt Lake County, Utah

4,185

86.3

0.7

(85.0–87.6)

Tooele County, Utah

610

87.8

1.6

(84.7–91.0)

Utah County, Utah

1,654

87.7

1.1

(85.5–89.9)

Wasatch County, Utah

500

87.4

2.4

(82.7–92.2)

Weber County, Utah

1,013

84.0

1.5

(81.1–86.9)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,531

90.3

1.0

(88.3–92.3)

Rutland County, Vermont

725

86.1

1.5

(83.1–89.0)

Washington County, Vermont

669

87.1

1.8

(83.6–90.7)

Windham County, Vermont

561

86.0

2.0

(82.0–89.9)

Windsor County, Vermont

683

87.7

1.6

(84.6–90.7)

Clark County, Washington

643

84.1

2.0

(80.2–88.1)

King County, Washington

3,330

87.7

0.9

(85.9–89.4)

Pierce County, Washington

974

83.5

1.7

(80.2–86.8)

Snohomish County, Washington

887

85.2

1.8

(81.7–88.7)

Spokane County, Washington

1,317

84.4

1.8

(81.0–87.8)

Thurston County, Washington

496

81.7

2.7

(76.3–87.0)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

640

74.3

2.1

(70.2–78.5)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,127

80.9

2.3

(76.4–85.3)

Fremont County, Wyoming

503

82.0

2.9

(76.3–87.8)

Laramie County, Wyoming

1,117

85.7

1.4

(82.9–88.4)

Natrona County, Wyoming

857

81.5

1.9

(77.8–85.1)

Median

84.2

Range

74.3–94.2

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.


TABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health-care coverage,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

4,999

77.8

0.8

(76.2–79.5)

Alaska

2,853

77.6

1.2

(75.3–79.9)

Arizona

3,816

77.6

1.3

(75.0–80.2)

Arkansas

2,776

70.7

1.4

(67.9–73.4)

California

12,474

78.5

0.5

(77.5–79.5)

Colorado

9,271

79.0

0.7

(77.7–80.4)

Connecticut

4,635

85.2

0.8

(83.7–86.8)

Delaware

3,164

87.4

0.9

(85.6–89.1)

District of Columbia

3,030

91.5

0.9

(89.8–93.1)

Florida

7,353

69.9

0.8

(68.3–71.6)

Georgia

6,673

71.0

0.9

(69.3–72.8)

Hawaii

5,014

88.6

0.7

(87.3–90.0)

Idaho

3,999

73.5

1.1

(71.3–75.7)

Illinois

3,632

80.0

1.0

(78.0–82.1)

Indiana

5,646

76.4

0.8

(74.9–77.9)

Iowa

4,779

85.8

0.7

(84.5–87.1)

Kansas

13,898

79.9

0.5

(79.0–80.8)

Kentucky

7,256

77.7

0.8

(76.1–79.4)

Louisiana

7,136

73.2

0.8

(71.6–74.9)

Maine

8,808

84.7

0.6

(83.6–85.8)

Maryland

7,051

84.7

0.8

(83.2–86.2)

Massachusetts

15,428

92.3

0.4

(91.5–93.0)

Michigan

7,367

81.7

0.7

(80.4–83.0)

Minnesota

11,439

86.5

0.5

(85.5–87.6)

Mississippi

5,838

69.3

0.8

(67.6–70.9)

Missouri

4,181

78.7

0.9

(76.9–80.4)

Montana

6,908

75.9

0.8

(74.4–77.5)

Nebraska

16,614

80.9

0.4

(80.0–81.7)

Nevada

3,713

67.9

1.4

(65.2–70.6)

New Hampshire

4,278

84.0

0.8

(82.4–85.5)

New Jersey

10,700

82.1

0.6

(81.0–83.2)

New Mexico

6,367

73.9

0.8

(72.3–75.4)

New York

5,448

82.7

0.8

(81.2–84.1)

North Carolina

7,535

75.1

0.8

(73.5–76.7)

North Dakota

3,579

83.8

0.9

(82.0–85.6)

Ohio

6,718

83.2

0.7

(81.8–84.5)

Oklahoma

5,501

73.4

0.9

(71.7–75.1)

Oregon

4,148

77.4

0.9

(75.6–79.2)

Pennsylvania

7,762

84.4

0.6

(83.2–85.6)

Rhode Island

4,407

83.4

0.8

(81.8–85.0)

South Carolina

8,472

74.6

0.7

(73.2–76.0)

South Dakota

5,443

84.6

0.9

(82.7–86.5)

Tennessee

3,640

78.3

1.5

(75.4–81.1)

Texas

9,766

65.4

0.8

(63.7–67.0)

Utah

9,419

78.3

0.6

(77.2–79.5)

Vermont

4,778

88.9

0.7

(87.6–90.2)

Virginia

4,610

82.3

0.9

(80.5–84.0)

Washington

9,490

78.7

0.7

(77.3–80.2)

West Virginia

3,643

75.0

0.9

(73.1–76.8)

Wisconsin

3,624

85.0

0.9

(83.2–86.8)

Wyoming

4,738

75.3

1.0

(73.4–77.2)

Guam

1,649

69.8

1.5

(66.9–72.8)

Puerto Rico

4,407

88.8

0.6

(87.6–90.0)

Median

78.7

Range

65.4–92.3

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).


TABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18-64 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Abbeville, Louisiana

333

80.6

3.7

(73.4–87.8)

Aberdeen, South Dakota

327

85.1

3.5

(78.3–91.8)

Akron, Ohio

512

86.6

2.4

(82.0–91.3)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

2,300

78.2

1.2

(75.9–80.6)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

808

84.9

2.0

(81.0–88.8)

Anchorage, Alaska

1,035

79.1

1.7

(75.7–82.4)

Asheville, North Carolina

318

72.9

3.7

(65.6–80.2)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

2,878

72.7

1.3

(70.2–75.2)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

722

79.1

2.6

(74.1–84.1)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

817

68.5

3.4

(61.9–75.1)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

766

86.0

1.8

(82.4–89.6)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

907

78.6

2.2

(74.3–82.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

2,593

86.8

1.1

(84.7–89.0)

Bangor, Maine

853

85.2

1.8

(81.6–88.8)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

289

93.0

2.1

(88.9–97.2)

Barre, Vermont

443

90.6

2.3

(86.2–95.1)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

766

77.3

2.0

(73.3–81.3)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland

1,321

83.9

1.8

(80.4–87.5)

Billings, Montana

753

80.9

2.0

(76.9–84.8)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,011

81.7

1.5

(78.8–84.6)

Bismarck, North Dakota

650

85.5

1.9

(81.8–89.3)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,070

75.2

1.9

(71.5–78.9)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts

4,239

92.2

0.8

(90.7–93.7)

Boulder, Colorado

424

83.6

2.9

(77.9–89.3)

Bozeman, Montana

441

77.2

2.8

(71.8–82.7)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

1,118

82.2

1.8

(78.7–85.8)

Brookings, South Dakota

330

84.1

5.2

(73.9–94.3)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

338

85.0

3.8

(77.5–92.4)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

1,550

91.4

1.0

(89.5–93.4)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts

3,073

94.7

0.7

(93.4–96.1)

Camden, New Jersey

1,427

83.5

1.6

(80.3–86.7)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

448

84.7

2.8

(79.3–90.2)

Casper, Wyoming

598

75.1

2.7

(69.8–80.4)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

454

85.7

2.4

(81.1–90.3)

Charleston, West Virginia

697

76.3

2.1

(72.3–80.4)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,106

75.4

2.0

(71.5–79.3)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,315

77.0

1.7

(73.6–80.4)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

376

82.8

3.8

(75.3–90.3)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

755

75.0

2.6

(69.8–80.2)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

2,674

78.3

1.3

(75.8–80.8)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,289

82.9

1.7

(79.6–86.2)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

811

84.2

1.6

(81.0–87.4)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

996

84.4

1.7

(81.0–87.8)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,183

80.2

1.9

(76.5–83.9)

Columbus, Nebraska

385

82.7

2.5

(77.8–87.5)

Columbus, Ohio

1,061

83.9

1.7

(80.5–87.3)

Concord, New Hampshire

491

82.3

2.6

(77.3–87.4)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas

607

68.7

2.3

(64.2–73.3)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18-64 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois

330

84.3

4.0

(76.4–92.2)

Dayton, Ohio

522

82.5

2.5

(77.6–87.5)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

4,102

79.0

1.0

(77.1–81.0)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

853

85.8

1.6

(82.6–89.0)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan

1,272

77.4

1.8

(73.9–80.8)

Dover, Delaware

949

83.3

2.2

(78.9–87.7)

Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin

483

84.1

3.0

(78.2–90.0)

Durham, North Carolina

659

77.2

3.2

(71.0–83.4)

Edison, New Jersey

1,971

86.5

1.1

(84.3–88.7)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

427

77.9

3.1

(71.9–83.9)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

353

81.9

2.9

(76.2–87.6)

Fairbanks, Alaska

451

76.3

3.1

(70.2–82.5)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

760

86.3

1.9

(82.5–90.0)

Farmington, New Mexico

497

75.4

2.9

(69.8–81.1)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

471

75.8

3.3

(69.4–82.2)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

461

87.5

2.3

(83.0–91.9)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

370

74.2

2.9

(68.5–79.9)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

460

69.5

2.9

(63.8–75.3)

Grand Island, Nebraska

654

77.8

2.2

(73.4–82.2)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

625

84.7

2.4

(80.0–89.4)

Great Falls, Montana

466

77.4

2.7

(72.2–82.6)

Greeley, Colorado

401

74.5

3.4

(67.8–81.2)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

651

73.1

2.9

(67.4–78.8)

Greenville, South Carolina

861

77.6

2.0

(73.6–81.6)

Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi

347

71.0

3.0

(65.1–76.9)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

476

81.8

2.7

(76.6–87.1)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

1,779

85.0

1.3

(82.4–87.5)

Hastings, Nebraska

433

80.3

2.7

(75.0–85.6)

Havre, Montana

385

76.8

3.6

(69.8–83.9)

Heber, Utah

353

79.6

3.5

(72.7–86.5)

Helena, Montana

538

77.2

3.0

(71.3–83.0)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

359

70.1

4.1

(62.1–78.0)

Hilo, Hawaii

977

86.7

1.7

(83.4–90.1)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

551

75.1

3.4

(68.5–81.7)

Honolulu, Hawaii

2,531

89.8

0.9

(88.1–91.5)

Houma-Bayou Cane-Thibodaux, Louisiana

361

71.4

3.4

(64.7–78.1)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,038

68.3

1.6

(65.2–71.4)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

504

74.4

3.6

(67.2–81.5)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

350

80.6

3.9

(73.0–88.2)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

1,337

78.1

1.5

(75.1–81.0)

Jackson, Mississippi

698

68.3

2.3

(63.7–72.8)

Jacksonville, Florida

625

74.1

2.9

(68.5–79.8)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,090

84.7

2.0

(80.8–88.6)

Kalispell, Montana

508

69.9

2.9

(64.2–75.5)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

4,692

82.3

1.1

(80.1–84.5)

Kapaa, Hawaii

416

88.4

2.7

(83.0–93.7)

Kearney, Nebraska

408

79.8

2.5

(74.8–84.7)

Keene, New Hampshire

348

83.6

2.9

(78.0–89.3)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

381

82.6

3.2

(76.2–88.9)

Knoxville, Tennessee

325

81.7

4.3

(73.3–90.1)

Lafayette, Louisiana

379

78.8

3.5

(72.0–85.6)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18-64 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Lake Charles, Louisiana

437

78.3

3.2

(72.0–84.6)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

484

69.3

2.9

(63.6–75.1)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

1,586

67.3

1.8

(63.8–70.8)

Lawrence, Kansas

554

79.6

2.4

(74.9–84.4)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,030

82.6

1.9

(79.0–86.3)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

300

83.5

3.3

(77.1–90.0)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

595

86.8

1.9

(83.0–90.5)

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

380

85.0

2.1

(80.8–89.1)

Lincoln, Nebraska

2,122

81.9

1.1

(79.8–84.0)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

617

74.0

2.8

(68.5–79.5)

Logan, Utah-Idaho

392

81.1

2.7

(75.8–86.4)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California

2,352

74.8

1.2

(72.5–77.1)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

1,736

78.9

1.7

(75.6–82.3)

Lubbock, Texas

443

70.8

5.1

(60.9–80.8)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,142

85.8

1.5

(82.9–88.7)

Manhattan, Kansas

553

86.2

2.4

(81.5–91.0)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

806

75.7

3.3

(69.3–82.1)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

978

67.4

1.9

(63.7–71.0)

Midland, Texas

321

80.7

5.4

(70.1–91.4)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

978

87.3

1.8

(83.8–90.8)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

7,415

87.6

0.6

(86.4–88.9)

Minot, North Dakota

385

84.6

2.4

(79.9–89.4)

Missoula, Montana

580

77.2

2.4

(72.6–81.8)

Mobile, Alabama

377

76.3

3.2

(70.1–82.5)

Monroe, Louisiana

325

69.9

3.6

(63.0–76.9)

Montgomery, Alabama

369

77.5

3.3

(71.1–84.0)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

472

66.8

2.8

(61.3–72.3)

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee

572

76.5

3.3

(70.0–83.0)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York

539

86.0

2.1

(81.9–90.0)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania

2,960

79.8

1.2

(77.5–82.2)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,013

85.8

1.6

(82.6–88.9)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

1,419

74.6

1.9

(70.9–78.2)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey

4,952

79.8

0.9

(78.0–81.6)

Norfolk, Nebraska

501

82.3

2.3

(77.9–86.8)

North Platte, Nebraska

445

80.0

2.4

(75.2–84.7)

Ocean City, New Jersey

325

78.0

4.2

(69.8–86.2)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

1,658

83.7

1.1

(81.5–85.9)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

1,817

73.6

1.5

(70.7–76.5)

Olympia, Washington

335

81.2

3.6

(74.2–88.2)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

4,916

80.9

0.8

(79.3–82.5)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

329

72.8

3.6

(65.7–79.8)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

726

70.8

2.3

(66.2–75.4)

Peabody, Massachusetts

1,824

91.8

1.3

(89.3–94.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1,834

85.5

1.1

(83.3–87.7)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

1,301

77.8

1.7

(74.5–81.1)

Pierre, South Dakota

370

85.7

3.4

(79.0–92.3)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

1,631

87.7

1.1

(85.5–89.9)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

2,884

86.5

1.0

(84.6–88.4)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18-64 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

2,451

81.4

1.2

(79.1–83.7)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

6,268

86.4

0.7

(85.0–87.8)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,340

77.8

1.6

(74.7–80.8)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

657

81.5

2.1

(77.3–85.7)

Rapid City, South Dakota

734

77.1

2.8

(71.7–82.6)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,128

69.5

2.5

(64.6–74.4)

Richmond, Virginia

713

81.0

2.6

(75.9–86.1)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,379

73.3

1.7

(70.1–76.6)

Riverton, Wyoming

308

75.4

4.1

(67.4–83.4)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,139

85.4

1.5

(82.5–88.3)

Rockland, Maine

420

86.9

2.5

(82.1–91.7)

Rutland, Vermont

468

87.2

2.3

(82.7–91.6)

Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville, California

884

81.7

2.0

(77.9–85.6)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

1,822

83.6

1.3

(81.2–86.1)

Salem, Oregon

390

71.4

3.5

(64.6–78.2)

Salt Lake City, Utah

3,970

77.3

0.9

(75.5–79.2)

San Antonio, Texas

777

73.9

2.5

(69.0–78.8)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,141

80.0

1.7

(76.6–83.3)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

1,575

87.3

1.3

(84.8–89.8)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

633

88.3

1.6

(85.1–91.6)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California

915

79.8

1.9

(76.1–83.5)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

524

67.7

3.1

(61.7–73.7)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

493

79.3

2.6

(74.1–84.4)

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

352

80.9

3.0

(75.1–86.8)

Seaford, Delaware

762

82.2

2.1

(78.2–86.3)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington

2,880

83.7

1.1

(81.5–85.9)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

395

72.1

3.2

(65.8–78.5)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

968

77.8

3.1

(71.7–83.9)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

936

84.4

1.9

(80.8–88.0)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18-64 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Spartanburg, South Carolina

399

72.5

3.2

(66.2–78.9)

Spearfish, South Dakota

319

71.2

4.9

(61.6–80.7)

Spokane, Washington

825

77.4

2.9

(71.7–83.0)

Springfield, Massachusetts

1,877

91.3

1.1

(89.2–93.5)

Tacoma, Washington

659

78.4

2.3

(73.9–82.8)

Tallahassee, Florida

441

79.6

3.1

(73.5–85.7)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

685

73.1

2.2

(68.8–77.4)

Toledo, Ohio

560

80.3

2.9

(74.7–85.9)

Topeka, Kansas

1,292

79.5

1.5

(76.6–82.4)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

442

82.4

2.9

(76.7–88.2)

Tucson, Arizona

488

82.7

2.3

(78.1–87.3)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

1,566

75.0

1.7

(71.8–78.3)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

381

79.1

3.0

(73.2–85.0)

Tyler, Texas

329

69.3

6.7

(56.3–82.4)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

903

82.5

1.9

(78.8–86.1)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,176

84.5

1.4

(81.8–87.2)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia

5,498

86.1

1.1

(84.1–88.2)

Watertown, South Dakota

340

81.5

5.8

(70.0–92.9)

Wichita, Kansas

2,951

79.3

1.0

(77.2–81.3)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey

1,795

89.9

1.1

(87.8–92.0)

Worcester, Massachusetts

1,945

92.0

1.1

(89.9–94.1)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

588

81.9

2.6

(76.7–87.1)

Median

80.5

Range

66.8–94.7

Abbreviations: MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

Metropolitan division.


TABLE 6. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

521

81.0

2.1

(76.8–85.1)

Mobile County, Alabama

377

76.3

3.2

(70.1–82.5)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

591

80.4

2.1

(76.3–84.5)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

451

76.3

3.1

(70.2–82.5)

Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska

444

74.0

2.8

(68.5–79.5)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,059

77.7

1.8

(74.2–81.1)

Pima County, Arizona

488

82.7

2.3

(78.1–87.3)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

422

69.4

3.8

(61.9–76.8)

Alameda County, California

537

85.7

2.3

(81.3–90.2)

Contra Costa County, California

378

84.1

2.9

(78.4–89.9)

Los Angeles County, California

2,352

74.8

1.2

(72.5–77.1)

Orange County, California

915

79.8

1.9

(76.1–83.5)

Riverside County, California

673

71.0

2.6

(65.9–76.0)

Sacramento County, California

526

79.1

2.6

(73.9–84.3)

San Bernardino County, California

706

75.4

2.2

(71.1–79.7)

San Diego County, California

1,141

80.0

1.7

(76.6–83.3)

Santa Clara County, California

602

88.4

1.7

(85.1–91.7)

Adams County, Colorado

712

75.3

2.5

(70.3–80.2)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

737

77.5

2.3

(72.9–82.0)

Boulder County, Colorado

424

83.6

2.9

(77.9–89.3)

Denver County, Colorado

773

74.3

2.2

(70.0–78.5)

Douglas County, Colorado

562

88.8

2.1

(84.5–93.0)

El Paso County, Colorado

882

84.3

1.8

(80.8–87.7)

Jefferson County, Colorado

946

82.9

1.9

(79.2–86.6)

Larimer County, Colorado

461

87.5

2.3

(83.0–91.9)

Weld County, Colorado

401

74.5

3.4

(67.8–81.2)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,118

82.2

1.8

(78.7–85.8)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,420

83.6

1.5

(80.6–86.5)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,013

85.8

1.6

(82.6–88.9)

Kent County, Delaware

949

83.3

2.2

(78.9–87.7)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,453

89.8

1.1

(87.7–92.0)

Sussex County, Delaware

762

82.2

2.1

(78.2–86.3)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

3,030

91.3

0.9

(89.6–93.0)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

514

61.3

2.6

(56.1–66.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

409

67.9

3.8

(60.4–75.4)

Fulton County, Georgia

464

71.6

3.0

(65.7–77.4)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

977

86.7

1.7

(83.4–90.1)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

2,531

89.8

0.9

(88.1–91.5)

Kauai County, Hawaii

416

88.4

2.7

(83.0–93.7)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,090

84.7

2.0

(80.8–88.6)

Ada County, Idaho

601

78.9

2.4

(74.2–83.6)

Canyon County, Idaho

370

71.1

3.3

(64.6–77.6)

Cook County, Illinois

1,129

77.1

1.7

(73.7–80.5)

Lake County, Indiana

604

72.7

3.2

(66.3–79.0)

Marion County, Indiana

858

72.0

2.2

(67.7–76.3)

Linn County, Iowa

407

84.9

2.4

(80.1–89.6)

Polk County, Iowa

649

84.5

1.9

(80.7–88.3)

Douglas County, Kansas

554

79.6

2.4

(74.9–84.4)

Johnson County, Kansas

2,370

86.8

1.0

(84.8–88.8)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

2,347

77.6

1.2

(75.2–80.0)

Shawnee County, Kansas

904

77.2

1.9

(73.5–80.9)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

784

61.5

2.5

(56.6–66.5)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

1,276

77.3

2.5

(72.5–82.2)

Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

393

77.6

3.4

(71.1–84.2)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

430

77.4

2.8

(71.9–82.9)

Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

333

80.6

3.7

(73.4–87.8)

Androscoggin County, Maine

595

86.8

1.9

(83.0–90.5)

Aroostook County, Maine

502

85.2

2.1

(81.1–89.3)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,519

86.6

1.3

(84.0–89.2)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Franklin County, Maine

336

80.7

3.5

(73.9–87.5)

Hancock County, Maine

373

81.3

2.9

(75.5–87.0)

Kennebec County, Maine

766

86.0

1.8

(82.4–89.6)

Knox County, Maine

420

86.9

2.5

(82.1–91.7)

Lincoln County, Maine

360

84.1

2.7

(78.7–89.5)

Oxford County, Maine

374

79.4

2.8

(74.0–84.9)

Penobscot County, Maine

853

85.2

1.8

(81.6–88.8)

Waldo County, Maine

417

83.7

2.6

(78.5–88.9)

Washington County, Maine

398

77.6

3.0

(71.8–83.4)

York County, Maine

1,062

86.6

1.6

(83.5–89.6)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

508

87.9

2.2

(83.5–92.3)

Baltimore County, Maryland

762

84.9

2.1

(80.9–88.9)

Frederick County, Maryland

439

86.3

3.1

(80.3–92.3)

Montgomery County, Maryland

882

82.9

2.1

(78.7–87.1)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

704

81.9

2.3

(77.3–86.5)

Baltimore city, Maryland

455

82.4

2.8

(76.9–87.8)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

289

93.0

2.1

(88.9–97.2)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

1,861

92.1

1.3

(89.6–94.6)

Essex County, Massachusetts

1,824

91.8

1.3

(89.3–94.3)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

1,432

89.9

1.4

(87.2–92.6)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,073

94.7

0.7

(93.4–96.1)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

1,235

95.6

0.9

(93.9–97.3)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

1,293

90.2

1.9

(86.5–93.9)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

1,711

90.6

1.3

(88.1–93.1)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

1,945

92.0

1.1

(89.9–94.1)

Kent County, Michigan

528

85.2

2.8

(79.8–90.6)

Oakland County, Michigan

628

83.9

2.1

(79.9–87.9)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,272

77.4

1.8

(73.9–80.8)

Anoka County, Minnesota

568

90.0

1.7

(86.6–93.4)

Dakota County, Minnesota

729

88.0

1.8

(84.5–91.6)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

3,131

86.0

1.0

(83.9–88.0)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

1,643

86.6

1.4

(83.9–89.2)

St. Louis County, Minnesota

377

84.0

3.3

(77.4–90.5)

Washington County, Minnesota

406

91.5

1.7

(88.2–94.9)

Jackson County, Missouri

452

78.5

2.8

(73.1–83.9)

St. Louis County, Missouri

478

83.1

2.5

(78.2–88.0)

St. Louis city, Missouri

383

78.2

3.3

(71.7–84.7)

Cascade County, Montana

466

77.4

2.7

(72.2–82.6)

Flathead County, Montana

508

69.9

2.9

(64.2–75.5)

Gallatin County, Montana

441

77.2

2.8

(71.8–82.7)

Hill County, Montana

385

76.8

3.6

(69.8–83.9)

Lake County, Montana

556

71.7

3.0

(65.7–77.6)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

462

75.7

3.3

(69.2–82.2)

Missoula County, Montana

580

77.2

2.4

(72.6–81.8)

Yellowstone County, Montana

684

80.9

2.2

(76.7–85.2)

Adams County, Nebraska

349

80.7

3.1

(74.7–86.7)

Buffalo County, Nebraska

347

79.4

2.7

(74.1–84.7)

Dakota County, Nebraska

578

72.4

4.1

(64.4–80.5)

Douglas County, Nebraska

3,169

78.7

1.0

(76.7–80.7)

Hall County, Nebraska

481

74.9

2.6

(69.8–80.0)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

1,924

81.7

1.1

(79.5–83.9)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

429

79.9

2.5

(75.1–84.7)

Madison County, Nebraska

327

81.1

2.8

(75.5–86.6)

Platte County, Nebraska

385

82.7

2.5

(77.8–87.5)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

913

88.9

1.4

(86.1–91.7)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

482

78.7

2.6

(73.6–83.8)

Thurston County, Nebraska

324

83.3

3.2

(77.0–89.7)

Clark County, Nevada

1,586

67.3

1.8

(63.8–70.8)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,109

69.9

2.5

(65.0–74.8)

Cheshire County, New Hampshire

348

83.6

2.9

(78.0–89.3)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

327

79.6

3.2

(73.3–85.9)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,142

85.8

1.5

(82.9–88.7)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

491

82.3

2.6

(77.3–87.4)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

705

87.6

1.8

(84.1–91.0)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

434

80.1

2.8

(74.7–85.5)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

722

79.1

2.6

(74.1–84.1)

Bergen County, New Jersey

629

82.4

2.1

(78.3–86.6)

Burlington County, New Jersey

484

84.8

2.9

(79.1–90.5)

Camden County, New Jersey

534

79.5

2.7

(74.2–84.9)

Cape May County, New Jersey

325

78.0

4.2

(69.8–86.2)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,028

76.5

2.0

(72.7–80.4)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

409

86.6

2.9

(80.9–92.2)

Hudson County, New Jersey

990

74.4

2.1

(70.3–78.4)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

406

89.4

3.2

(83.1–95.8)

Mercer County, New Jersey

442

82.4

2.9

(76.7–88.2)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

624

85.4

1.9

(81.6–89.2)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

515

86.1

2.3

(81.5–90.6)

Morris County, New Jersey

576

89.0

1.8

(85.4–92.5)

Ocean County, New Jersey

365

88.7

2.2

(84.4–93.1)

Passaic County, New Jersey

456

78.3

2.8

(72.7–83.8)

Somerset County, New Jersey

467

86.8

2.5

(81.9–91.7)

Sussex County, New Jersey

406

86.4

2.6

(81.3–91.6)

Union County, New Jersey

504

73.4

2.8

(67.9–78.8)

Warren County, New Jersey

395

85.2

2.7

(79.9–90.5)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,389

79.4

1.4

(76.5–82.2)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

484

69.3

2.9

(63.6–75.1)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

512

80.8

2.6

(75.6–86.0)

San Juan County, New Mexico

497

75.4

2.9

(69.8–81.1)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

524

67.7

3.1

(61.7–73.7)

Valencia County, New Mexico

343

68.0

3.6

(60.9–75.2)

Kings County, New York

808

77.7

2.0

(73.8–81.7)

New York County, New York

724

86.3

1.6

(83.2–89.5)

Queens County, New York

577

78.0

2.3

(73.6–82.4)

Durham County, North Carolina

362

72.6

4.6

(63.5–81.6)

Guilford County, North Carolina

382

76.9

3.2

(70.6–83.2)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

501

76.1

2.6

(71.0–81.2)

Wake County, North Carolina

437

81.8

2.5

(76.9–86.8)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

469

85.4

2.2

(81.0–89.7)

Cass County, North Dakota

667

85.1

2.2

(80.9–89.3)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

511

79.7

2.3

(75.2–84.3)

Franklin County, Ohio

547

83.8

2.2

(79.4–88.2)

Hamilton County, Ohio

492

83.3

3.1

(77.3–89.4)

Lucas County, Ohio

452

77.1

3.6

(70.0–84.2)

Mahoning County, Ohio

400

75.9

4.5

(67.0–84.8)

Montgomery County, Ohio

422

81.2

3.0

(75.3–87.2)

Stark County, Ohio

421

85.2

2.7

(79.9–90.6)

Summit County, Ohio

437

87.4

2.6

(82.4–92.5)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

349

77.8

3.5

(70.9–84.7)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,002

70.9

2.0

(67.1–74.7)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,142

74.0

2.0

(70.0–78.0)

Clackamas County, Oregon

369

84.8

2.4

(80.1–89.4)

Lane County, Oregon

427

77.9

3.1

(71.9–83.9)

Multnomah County, Oregon

804

80.8

2.0

(77.0–84.7)

Washington County, Oregon

524

82.1

2.5

(77.1–87.0)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

908

89.6

1.3

(87.0–92.1)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,016

79.0

1.9

(75.3–82.7)

Kent County, Rhode Island

635

88.5

1.9

(84.8–92.1)

Providence County, Rhode Island

2,733

80.4

1.2

(78.0–82.7)

Washington County, Rhode Island

524

90.1

1.8

(86.6–93.6)

Aiken County, South Carolina

387

74.4

3.7

(67.2–81.6)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health-care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

447

75.6

3.9

(67.9–83.3)

Charleston County, South Carolina

615

74.7

2.7

(69.5–80.0)

Greenville County, South Carolina

603

79.5

2.3

(75.0–84.0)

Horry County, South Carolina

472

66.8

2.8

(61.3–72.3)

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

329

72.8

3.6

(65.7–79.8)

Richland County, South Carolina

639

81.9

2.5

(77.1–86.7)

Spartanburg County, South Carolina

399

72.5

3.2

(66.2–78.8)

Brookings County, South Dakota

330

84.1

5.2

(73.9–94.3)

Brown County, South Dakota

311

85.1

3.6

(78.1–92.1)

Codington County, South Dakota

321

75.7

9.6

(56.9–94.4)

Hughes County, South Dakota

352

82.8

3.9

(75.0–90.5)

Lawrence County, South Dakota

319

71.2

4.9

(61.6–80.7)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

549

84.0

2.2

(79.6–88.3)

Pennington County, South Dakota

422

76.4

3.4

(69.6–83.1)

Bexar County, Texas

669

74.9

2.7

(69.7–80.2)

Eastland County, Texas

309

77.3

5.9

(65.8–88.8)

Fort Bend County, Texas

713

82.0

3.3

(75.6–88.4)

Harris County, Texas

1,077

66.6

1.9

(62.8–70.3)

Lubbock County, Texas

435

71.3

5.1

(61.3–81.4)

Midland County, Texas

321

80.7

5.4

(70.1–91.4)

Smith County, Texas

329

69.3

6.7

(56.3–82.4)

Tarrant County, Texas

392

68.9

3.1

(62.8–75.0)

Travis County, Texas

719

77.6

2.7

(72.3–82.9)

Davis County, Utah

891

87.8

1.4

(85.1–90.4)

Salt Lake County, Utah

3,210

77.0

1.0

(75.0–78.9)

Tooele County, Utah

444

83.3

2.8

(77.8–88.7)

Utah County, Utah

1,295

77.8

1.6

(74.6–80.9)

Wasatch County, Utah

353

79.6

3.5

(72.7–86.5)

Weber County, Utah

729

78.1

2.0

(74.2–81.9)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,123

92.3

1.1

(90.1–94.5)

Rutland County, Vermont

468

87.2

2.3

(82.7–91.6)

Washington County, Vermont

443

90.6

2.3

(86.2–95.1)

Windham County, Vermont

370

89.6

2.0

(85.7–93.4)

Windsor County, Vermont

440

87.5

2.4

(82.9–92.1)

Clark County, Washington

449

78.9

2.9

(73.3–84.5)

King County, Washington

2,275

83.9

1.3

(81.3–86.4)

Pierce County, Washington

659

78.4

2.3

(73.9–82.8)

Snohomish County, Washington

605

82.8

2.4

(78.0–87.6)

Spokane County, Washington

825

77.4

2.9

(71.7–83.0)

Thurston County, Washington

335

81.2

3.6

(74.2–88.2)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

448

75.1

2.7

(69.7–80.5)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

815

86.9

2.0

(83.0–90.8)

Fremont County, Wyoming

308

75.4

4.1

(67.4–83.4)

Laramie County, Wyoming

755

75.0

2.6

(69.8–80.2)

Natrona County, Wyoming

598

75.1

2.7

(69.8–80.4)

Median

80.8

Range

61.3–95.6

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).


TABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

7,608

71.5

0.8

(69.9–73.0)

Alaska

3,453

58.5

1.2

(56.1–60.9)

Arizona

6,408

61.8

1.2

(59.5–64.1)

Arkansas

4,684

60.7

1.2

(58.4–63.1)

California

17,942

63.3

0.5

(62.2–64.3)

Colorado

13,331

58.3

0.7

(57.0–59.6)

Connecticut

6,779

70.4

0.8

(68.8–72.0)

Delaware

4,743

79.0

0.9

(77.3–80.8)

District of Columbia

4,535

74.6

1.0

(72.5–76.6)

Florida

12,257

68.1

0.7

(66.7–69.4)

Georgia

9,817

71.4

0.7

(70.0–72.9)

Hawaii

7,544

60.0

0.9

(58.2–61.7)

Idaho

6,028

55.4

1.0

(53.5–57.4)

Illinois

5,460

64.3

1.0

(62.4–66.2)

Indiana

8,413

62.1

0.8

(60.7–63.6)

Iowa

7,259

69.0

0.7

(67.6–70.4)

Kansas

20,329

67.8

0.5

(66.9–68.7)

Kentucky

10,619

66.2

0.8

(64.7–67.7)

Louisiana

10,752

72.9

0.7

(71.5–74.4)

Maine

13,167

70.7

0.6

(69.5–71.8)

Maryland

10,018

75.8

0.7

(74.5–77.2)

Massachusetts

22,130

78.8

0.5

(77.8–79.8)

Michigan

10,935

66.5

0.7

(65.1–67.9)

Minnesota

15,220

68.6

0.6

(67.5–69.7)

Mississippi

8,769

65.0

0.7

(63.5–66.4)

Missouri

6,307

65.7

0.9

(63.9–67.4)

Montana

10,101

55.7

0.8

(54.2–57.2)

Nebraska

24,983

57.7

0.5

(56.8–58.7)

Nevada

5,402

61.3

1.2

(59.0–63.6)

New Hampshire

6,297

70.7

0.8

(69.1–72.3)

New Jersey

15,201

74.8

0.6

(73.8–75.9)

New Mexico

9,270

58.2

0.7

(56.8–59.6)

New York

7,657

71.9

0.7

(70.5–73.3)

North Carolina

11,364

72.7

0.7

(71.2–74.1)

North Dakota

5,257

61.1

0.9

(59.3–62.9)

Ohio

9,825

69.9

0.7

(68.6–71.3)

Oklahoma

8,362

57.4

0.8

(55.8–58.9)

Oregon

6,043

55.3

0.9

(53.6–57.1)

Pennsylvania

11,420

69.4

0.6

(68.1–70.7)

Rhode Island

6,498

75.4

0.8

(73.8–77.0)

South Carolina

12,681

65.3

0.7

(63.9–66.7)

South Dakota

8,166

65.3

1.1

(63.2–67.4)

Tennessee

5,830

75.3

1.3

(72.8–77.9)

Texas

14,797

60.0

0.7

(58.5–61.4)

Utah

12,378

55.5

0.6

(54.3–56.7)

Vermont

7,032

67.0

0.8

(65.5–68.6)

Virginia

6,517

73.7

0.9

(72.0–75.4)

Washington

14,542

59.9

0.7

(58.6–61.3)

West Virginia

5,238

74.9

0.8

(73.3–76.4)

Wisconsin

5,266

67.0

1.0

(65.0–69.0)

Wyoming

6,809

53.5

0.9

(51.7–55.3)

Guam

1,853

63.4

1.4

(60.6–66.3)

Puerto Rico

6,544

74.5

0.7

(73.2–75.9)

Median

66.5

Range

53.5–79.0

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.


TABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Abbeville, Louisiana

506

71.5

4.6

(62.6–80.5)

Aberdeen, South Dakota

543

65.2

3.8

(57.7–72.6)

Akron, Ohio

779

74.4

2.5

(69.6–79.2)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

3,205

58.5

1.2

(56.2–60.8)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

1,152

71.2

2.1

(67.1–75.3)

Anchorage, Alaska

1,241

60.2

1.9

(56.5–63.9)

Asheville, North Carolina

563

69.7

3.1

(63.7–75.7)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

3,973

70.1

1.1

(67.9–72.3)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

1,059

79.2

2.0

(75.3–83.1)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

1,206

75.1

2.3

(70.5–79.7)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

1,110

70.0

1.9

(66.3–73.8)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

1,286

62.3

2.3

(57.8–66.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,618

77.3

1.1

(75.1–79.4)

Bangor, Maine

1,189

72.6

1.8

(69.1–76.2)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

515

80.6

2.7

(75.4–85.9)

Barre, Vermont

672

72.8

2.5

(67.8–77.7)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,106

71.3

1.9

(67.6–75.0)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland*

1,799

71.5

1.7

(68.2–74.8)

Billings, Montana

1,129

60.1

2.1

(56.0–64.1)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,466

74.9

1.6

(71.9–78.0)

Bismarck, North Dakota

965

58.0

2.1

(53.9–62.2)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,524

56.2

1.8

(52.7–59.8)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts*

6,019

78.6

0.9

(76.8–80.4)

Boulder, Colorado

583

58.5

3.1

(52.4–64.6)

Bozeman, Montana

580

45.6

2.7

(40.4–50.8)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

1,641

69.1

1.7

(65.8–72.5)

Brookings, South Dakota

493

57.2

4.6

(48.1–66.2)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

496

77.6

2.6

(72.5–82.8)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

2,107

63.9

1.4

(61.1–66.6)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts*

4,267

77.0

1.1

(74.8–79.2)

Camden, New Jersey*

2,065

73.5

1.5

(70.5–76.4)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

704

72.4

2.9

(66.6–78.1)

Casper, Wyoming

849

54.1

2.4

(49.3–58.9)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

709

68.7

2.5

(63.8–73.6)

Charleston, West Virginia

976

73.9

1.8

(70.3–77.5)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,629

65.4

1.8

(61.8–69.1)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,852

68.5

1.7

(65.2–71.8)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

609

75.2

4.1

(67.3–83.2)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

1,113

57.5

2.3

(52.9–62.1)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

3,776

63.9

1.2

(61.6–66.3)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,887

69.7

1.7

(66.5–73.0)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,157

71.4

1.7

(68.0–74.8)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,381

62.3

1.9

(58.6–66.0)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,671

68.3

1.9

(64.6–72.0)

Columbus, Nebraska

596

57.4

2.5

(52.5–62.3)

Columbus, Ohio

1,425

71.7

1.8

(68.2–75.2)

Concord, New Hampshire

708

70.1

2.4

(65.5–74.8)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas*

822

59.8

2.3

(55.4–64.2)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois

513

69.3

3.7

(62.1–76.5)

Dayton, Ohio

796

70.7

2.5

(65.8–75.7)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

5,661

59.8

0.9

(57.9–61.6)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

1,250

67.6

1.7

(64.3–71.0)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan*

1,864

69.3

1.7

(66.0–72.7)

Dover, Delaware

1,408

77.2

2.1

(73.0–81.4)

Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin

672

67.5

2.7

(62.2–72.8)

Durham, North Carolina

960

75.4

2.6

(70.2–80.5)

Edison, New Jersey*

2,860

74.5

1.2

(72.1–76.9)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

643

52.9

2.8

(47.4–58.4)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

554

70.7

2.9

(65.0–76.3)

Fairbanks, Alaska

552

55.2

2.9

(49.4–60.9)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

1,069

64.4

2.2

(60.2–68.7)

Farmington, New Mexico

736

59.0

2.8

(53.6–64.4)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

773

59.5

3.1

(53.4–65.5)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

670

57.8

2.8

(52.4–63.2)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

537

57.9

2.8

(52.4–63.4)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas*

676

63.0

2.6

(57.9–68.1)

Grand Island, Nebraska

1,003

53.0

2.1

(49.0–57.1)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

887

63.6

2.9

(57.9–69.2)

Great Falls, Montana

704

61.2

2.5

(56.3–66.1)

Greeley, Colorado

555

54.5

3.2

(48.3–60.7)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

1,054

68.0

2.7

(62.8–73.3)

Greenville, South Carolina

1,210

63.4

2.1

(59.3–67.6)

Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi

504

58.6

2.8

(53.0–64.2)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

694

75.8

2.5

(71.0–80.6)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

2,608

71.4

1.4

(68.7–74.1)

Hastings, Nebraska

677

53.9

2.6

(48.9–59.0)

Havre, Montana

551

51.3

3.2

(44.9–57.6)

Heber, Utah

492

56.4

3.5

(49.4–63.3)

Helena, Montana

762

53.7

2.5

(48.8–58.6)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

575

74.2

3.2

(67.9–80.4)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,465

54.5

2.0

(50.6–58.4)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

1,003

64.1

2.7

(58.8–69.4)

Honolulu, Hawaii

3,806

61.6

1.2

(59.4–63.9)

Houma-Bayou Cane-Thibodaux, Louisiana

535

73.2

2.9

(67.6–78.8)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,767

60.7

1.4

(57.9–63.5)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

732

71.8

3.1

(65.8–77.9)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

501

54.2

3.5

(47.3–61.0)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

1,966

62.7

1.5

(59.7–65.7)

Jackson, Mississippi

930

68.6

2.0

(64.6–72.5)

Jacksonville, Florida

970

70.9

2.4

(66.2–75.6)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,606

56.2

2.0

(52.2–60.2)

Kalispell, Montana

699

57.9

2.6

(52.8–63.0)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

6,702

66.6

1.2

(64.3–69.0)

Kapaa, Hawaii

667

58.6

3.1

(52.5–64.7)

Kearney, Nebraska

607

54.2

2.5

(49.2–59.2)

Keene, New Hampshire

516

61.5

3.1

(55.4–67.7)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

615

72.7

4.7

(63.5–81.8)

Knoxville, Tennessee

551

76.4

4.2

(68.1–84.7)

Lafayette, Louisiana

543

70.3

3.3

(63.8–76.8)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Lake Charles, Louisiana

642

75.7

3.0

(69.8–81.7)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

728

58.9

2.6

(53.8–64.0)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

2,183

61.8

1.5

(58.8–64.8)

Lawrence, Kansas

753

65.3

2.4

(60.7–70.0)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,563

71.2

1.7

(67.8–74.6)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

498

63.8

4.1

(55.8–71.8)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

838

76.9

2.0

(73.0–80.7)

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

515

68.1

2.5

(63.2–73.0)

Lincoln, Nebraska

2,777

55.7

1.2

(53.4–58.0)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

986

62.8

2.5

(58.0–67.6)

Logan, Utah-Idaho

539

52.9

3.1

(46.9–58.9)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California*

3,197

66.5

1.1

(64.3–68.8)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

2,563

66.8

1.6

(63.6–69.9)

Lubbock, Texas

764

65.4

4.4

(56.9–74.0)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,590

70.1

1.6

(67.0–73.3)

Manhattan, Kansas

745

65.0

2.7

(59.7–70.4)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

1,191

78.5

2.6

(73.3–83.7)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

1,418

69.7

1.6

(66.5–72.9)

Midland, Texas

536

63.4

7.1

(49.4–77.4)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

1,349

67.6

2.4

(62.9–72.2)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

9,629

68.0

0.8

(66.5–69.5)

Minot, North Dakota

532

65.6

2.7

(60.4–70.8)

Missoula, Montana

783

53.1

2.5

(48.1–58.1)

Mobile, Alabama

596

70.1

3.0

(64.3–76.0)

Monroe, Louisiana

499

71.0

3.2

(64.8–77.2)

Montgomery, Alabama

510

71.8

2.9

(66.2–77.4)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

794

62.2

2.4

(57.6–66.8)

Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro, Tennessee

848

70.3

3.2

(64.0–76.5)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York–

768

73.8

2.2

(69.5–78.2)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania*

4,062

74.4

1.1

(72.3–76.6)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,473

72.3

1.7

(69.0–75.6)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

2,070

73.6

1.6

(70.5–76.8)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey*

6,675

72.7

0.9

(71.1–74.4)

Norfolk, Nebraska

765

57.5

2.3

(53.1–62.0)

North Platte, Nebraska

652

56.5

2.4

(51.9–61.2)

Ocean City, New Jersey

603

77.5

2.8

(72.0–83.1)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

2,193

58.9

1.3

(56.3–61.5)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,626

56.3

1.4

(53.6–59.1)

Olympia, Washington

488

61.2

3.4

(54.6–67.8)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

6,646

61.1

0.9

(59.4–62.8)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

522

68.7

3.3

(62.3–75.1)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

1,089

62.5

2.1

(58.4–66.5)

Peabody, Massachusetts

2,686

80.6

1.5

(77.6–83.6)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania*

2,590

72.6

1.3

(70.0–75.1)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

2,050

60.5

1.6

(57.3–63.6)

Pierre, South Dakota

560

68.1

3.5

(61.2–75.0)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,479

70.6

1.3

(68.1–73.1)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

4,308

70.8

1.0

(68.8–72.7)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

3,333

56.7

1.2

(54.3–59.1)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

9,317

77.9

0.8

(76.4–79.4)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,676

51.0

1.7

(47.7–54.4)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

876

74.0

2.0

(70.0–78.0)

Rapid City, South Dakota

1,133

58.4

2.9

(52.7–64.0)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,650

60.3

2.1

(56.3–64.3)

Richmond, Virginia

983

75.1

2.2

(70.8–79.4)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,974

62.2

1.6

(59.1–65.3)

Riverton, Wyoming

501

49.7

3.4

(43.0–56.4)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire*

1,675

73.4

1.6

(70.4–76.5)

Rockland, Maine

655

70.7

2.7

(65.5–76.0)

Rutland, Vermont

729

68.6

2.5

(63.8–73.5)

Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, California

1,275

60.2

2.0

(56.3–64.0)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

2,660

69.9

1.4

(67.1–72.6)

Salem, Oregon

585

51.6

3.0

(45.7–57.4)

Salt Lake City, Utah

5,119

55.6

0.9

(53.7–57.4)

San Antonio, Texas

1,207

60.8

2.3

(56.3–65.3)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,685

62.2

1.7

(58.9–65.6)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

2,306

64.3

1.4

(61.5–67.2)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

877

65.6

2.4

(61.0–70.3)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California*

1,340

64.5

1.9

(60.8–68.2)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

790

58.5

2.5

(53.6–63.4)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

868

56.6

2.3

(52.0–61.2)

Scranton–Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

530

73.2

2.7

(67.9–78.5)

Seaford, Delaware

1,322

79.6

1.7

(76.3–83.0)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington*

4,166

60.5

1.2

(58.1–62.8)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

604

73.6

2.6

(68.4–78.7)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

1,500

67.7

2.9

(62.0–73.4)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

1,295

65.7

2.2

(61.4–70.0)

Spartanburg, South Carolina

574

60.9

3.1

(54.8–67.0)

Spearfish, South Dakota

527

58.5

3.7

(51.2–65.8)

Spokane, Washington

1,308

59.6

2.6

(54.5–64.6)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,666

80.2

1.4

(77.5–83.0)

Tacoma, Washington*

956

65.7

2.2

(61.5–69.9)

Tallahassee, Florida

632

66.9

3.3

(60.4–73.3)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

1,113

68.8

1.9

(65.0–72.6)

Toledo, Ohio

803

67.3

2.7

(62.0–72.6)

Topeka, Kansas

1,889

66.0

1.4

(63.2–68.8)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

621

78.1

2.3

(73.5–82.7)

Tucson, Arizona

833

65.3

2.5

(60.4–70.2)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,360

58.5

1.5

(55.5–61.5)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

536

77.7

2.7

(72.3–83.0)

Tyler, Texas

563

56.8

5.3

(46.4–67.2)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

1,312

78.8

1.6

(75.6–82.0)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan*

1,685

66.8

1.6

(63.7–69.8)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia*

7,728

72.5

1.1

(70.3–74.8)

Watertown, South Dakota

526

63.5

5.2

(53.3–73.7)

Wichita, Kansas

4,200

70.9

1.0

(69.0–72.8)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey*

2,525

78.5

1.3

(76.1–81.0)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,697

77.9

1.3

(75.3–80.6)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

929

70.5

2.8

(64.9–76.1)

Median

66.8

Range

45.6–80.6

Abbreviations: MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Metropolitan division.


TABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

764

75.5

2.0

(71.6–79.4)

Mobile County, Alabama

596

70.1

3.0

(64.3–76.0)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

694

61.0

2.3

(56.5–65.6)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

552

55.2

2.9

(49.4–60.9)

Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska

547

58.0

2.7

(52.8–63.3)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,605

60.4

1.7

(57.1–63.7)

Pima County, Arizona

833

65.3

2.5

(60.4–70.2)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

666

68.0

3.0

(62.1–73.9)

Alameda County, California

743

67.4

2.4

(62.7–72.1)

Contra Costa County, California

580

63.3

3.1

(57.3–69.3)

Los Angeles County, California

3,197

66.5

1.1

(64.3–68.8)

Orange County, California

1,340

64.5

1.9

(60.8–68.2)

Riverside County, California

1,034

61.0

2.3

(56.5–65.5)

Sacramento County, California

745

60.5

2.5

(55.6–65.5)

San Bernardino County, California

940

63.6

2.2

(59.4–67.9)

San Diego County, California

1,685

62.2

1.7

(58.9–65.6)

Santa Clara County, California

832

65.1

2.4

(60.4–69.8)

Adams County, Colorado

978

53.2

2.4

(48.6–57.9)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

1,042

63.1

2.1

(59.0–67.2)

Boulder County, Colorado

583

58.5

3.1

(52.4–64.6)

Denver County, Colorado

1,081

59.0

2.0

(55.0–62.9)

Douglas County, Colorado

682

64.6

2.5

(59.7–69.5)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,215

62.0

1.9

(58.2–65.8)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,373

60.4

1.9

(56.8–64.1)

Larimer County, Colorado

670

57.8

2.8

(52.4–63.2)

Weld County, Colorado

555

54.5

3.2

(48.3–60.7)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

1,641

69.1

1.7

(65.8–72.5)

Hartford County, Connecticut

2,093

71.8

1.5

(68.9–74.8)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,473

72.3

1.7

(69.0–75.6)

Kent County, Delaware

1,408

77.2

2.1

(73.0–81.4)

New Castle County, Delaware

2,013

79.2

1.3

(76.7–81.6)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,322

79.6

1.7

(76.3–83.0)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

4,535

74.5

1.1

(72.4–76.6)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

704

66.9

2.3

(62.4–71.4)

DeKalb County, Georgia

563

71.0

3.2

(64.8–77.2)

Fulton County, Georgia

630

68.9

2.7

(63.7–74.2)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,465

54.5

2.0

(50.6–58.4)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

3,806

61.6

1.2

(59.4–63.9)

Kauai County, Hawaii

667

58.6

3.1

(52.5–64.7)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,606

56.2

2.0

(52.2–60.2)

Ada County, Idaho

846

57.5

2.3

(52.9–62.1)

Canyon County, Idaho

521

54.6

3.2

(48.4–60.8)

Cook County, Illinois

1,604

66.5

1.6

(63.3–69.6)

Lake County, Indiana

884

64.8

3.0

(58.9–70.7)

Marion County, Indiana

1,313

62.0

2.0

(58.0–66.0)

Linn County, Iowa

634

69.1

2.6

(64.0–74.1)

Polk County, Iowa

952

67.9

2.0

(64.0–71.7)

Douglas County, Kansas

753

65.3

2.4

(60.7–70.0)

Johnson County, Kansas

3,306

70.5

1.1

(68.3–72.6)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

3,314

71.1

1.1

(68.9–73.2)

Shawnee County, Kansas

1,305

65.9

1.7

(62.5–69.3)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

1,141

62.2

2.2

(58.0–66.5)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

1,946

71.4

2.0

(67.5–75.3)

Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

580

75.2

3.1

(69.1–81.3)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

618

73.7

2.5

(68.8–78.6)

Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

506

71.5

4.6

(62.6–80.5)

Androscoggin County, Maine

838

76.9

2.0

(73.0–80.7)

Aroostook County, Maine

738

75.2

2.2

(70.8–79.6)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Cumberland County, Maine

2,253

69.9

1.4

(67.2–72.6)

Franklin County, Maine

510

70.3

3.0

(64.3–76.2)

Hancock County, Maine

600

68.5

2.7

(63.2–73.9)

Kennebec County, Maine

1,110

70.0

1.9

(66.3–73.8)

Knox County, Maine

655

70.7

2.7

(65.5–76.0)

Lincoln County, Maine

644

68.7

2.7

(63.4–74.0)

Oxford County, Maine

550

70.0

2.6

(64.8–75.1)

Penobscot County, Maine

1,189

72.6

1.8

(69.1–76.2)

Waldo County, Maine

613

60.2

3.0

(54.3–66.1)

Washington County, Maine

620

61.6

2.8

(56.0–67.1)

York County, Maine

1,569

71.6

1.6

(68.5–74.7)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

702

73.8

2.3

(69.2–78.4)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,080

81.2

1.8

(77.6–84.7)

Frederick County, Maryland

585

74.4

2.6

(69.3–79.4)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,214

70.8

2.0

(66.9–74.8)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

942

77.6

2.0

(73.6–81.6)

Baltimore city, Maryland

641

77.7

2.4

(73.0–82.4)

Barnstable County, Massachusetts

515

80.6

2.7

(75.4–85.9)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

2,819

82.8

1.6

(79.7–86.0)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,686

80.6

1.5

(77.6–83.6)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

2,056

79.8

1.7

(76.5–83.2)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

4,267

77.0

1.1

(74.8–79.2)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

1,814

77.9

1.6

(74.7–81.0)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

1,903

78.6

1.9

(74.9–82.3)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

2,302

79.2

1.4

(76.5–81.9)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,697

77.9

1.3

(75.3–80.6)

Kent County, Michigan

750

64.4

3.2

(58.1–70.7)

Oakland County, Michigan

908

66.8

2.2

(62.6–71.0)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,864

69.3

1.7

(66.0–72.7)

Anoka County, Minnesota

720

69.6

2.4

(64.9–74.3)

Dakota County, Minnesota

874

71.3

2.2

(67.0–75.5)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

4,104

67.8

1.2

(65.5–70.1)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

2,247

67.2

1.8

(63.7–70.8)

St. Louis County, Minnesota

526

68.3

3.0

(62.5–74.1)

Washington County, Minnesota

530

70.3

2.8

(64.7–75.8)

Jackson County, Missouri

675

68.7

2.4

(63.9–73.4)

St. Louis County, Missouri

691

69.7

2.6

(64.7–74.7)

St. Louis city, Missouri

529

73.7

2.9

(68.0–79.5)

Cascade County, Montana

704

61.2

2.5

(56.3–66.1)

Flathead County, Montana

699

57.9

2.6

(52.8–63.0)

Gallatin County, Montana

580

45.6

2.7

(40.4–50.8)

Hill County, Montana

551

51.3

3.2

(44.9–57.6)

Lake County, Montana

887

55.1

2.6

(49.9–60.3)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

649

53.5

2.7

(48.2–58.9)

Missoula County, Montana

783

53.1

2.5

(48.1–58.1)

Yellowstone County, Montana

1,008

60.7

2.2

(56.5–65.0)

Adams County, Nebraska

556

53.4

2.9

(47.8–59.0)

Buffalo County, Nebraska

510

53.9

2.7

(48.5–59.2)

Dakota County, Nebraska

915

55.8

3.9

(48.1–63.4)

Douglas County, Nebraska

4,343

58.4

1.1

(56.3–60.6)

Hall County, Nebraska

715

51.3

2.3

(46.7–55.9)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

2,479

55.7

1.2

(53.3–58.1)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

625

57.3

2.4

(52.6–62.1)

Madison County, Nebraska

516

55.7

2.8

(50.3–61.1)

Platte County, Nebraska

596

57.4

2.5

(52.5–62.3)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

1,147

62.2

1.9

(58.4–66.0)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

848

55.9

2.3

(51.4–60.5)

Thurston County, Nebraska

515

66.3

3.5

(59.4–73.2)

Clark County, Nevada

2,183

61.8

1.5

(58.8–64.8)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,617

60.1

2.1

(56.0–64.2)

Cheshire County, New Hampshire

516

61.5

3.1

(55.4–67.7)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

501

73.0

3.0

(67.0–78.9)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,590

70.1

1.6

(67.0–73.3)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

708

70.1

2.4

(65.5–74.8)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,041

74.2

1.9

(70.6–77.8)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

634

71.8

2.8

(66.3–77.3)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

1,059

79.2

2.0

(75.3–83.1)

Bergen County, New Jersey

879

75.8

2.0

(71.9–79.7)

Burlington County, New Jersey

700

75.0

2.6

(69.9–80.0)

Camden County, New Jersey

792

73.5

2.4

(68.9–78.1)

Cape May County, New Jersey

603

77.5

2.8

(72.0–83.1)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,355

75.7

1.7

(72.3–79.2)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

573

70.9

3.1

(64.9–76.9)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,268

75.4

1.6

(72.2–78.6)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

571

69.9

3.1

(63.9–75.9)

Mercer County, New Jersey

621

78.1

2.3

(73.5–82.7)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

843

73.8

2.2

(69.5–78.1)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

716

71.8

2.4

(67.1–76.5)

Morris County, New Jersey

823

78.1

1.9

(74.4–81.9)

Ocean County, New Jersey

650

79.6

2.3

(75.1–84.1)

Passaic County, New Jersey

621

71.8

2.7

(66.6–77.0)

Somerset County, New Jersey

651

72.6

2.8

(67.1–78.0)

Sussex County, New Jersey

573

70.9

3.1

(64.7–77.0)

Union County, New Jersey

689

74.4

2.3

(69.9–78.9)

Warren County, New Jersey

572

73.6

2.6

(68.4–78.8)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,896

58.6

1.4

(55.8–61.4)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

728

58.9

2.6

(53.8–64.0)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

728

62.2

2.6

(57.1–67.3)

San Juan County, New Mexico

736

59.0

2.8

(53.6–64.4)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

790

58.5

2.5

(53.6–63.4)

Valencia County, New Mexico

499

50.8

3.2

(44.6–57.0)

Kings County, New York

1,023

71.8

1.9

(68.0–75.5)

New York County, New York

1,049

71.5

1.9

(67.8–75.2)

Queens County, New York

786

72.0

2.2

(67.8–76.3)

Durham County, North Carolina

535

76.0

3.7

(68.7–83.3)

Guilford County, North Carolina

625

68.0

3.3

(61.5–74.5)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

668

70.8

2.4

(66.1–75.6)

Wake County, North Carolina

570

74.7

2.4

(70.1–79.4)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

697

60.0

2.5

(55.2–64.9)

Cass County, North Dakota

945

62.3

2.3

(57.9–66.8)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

742

71.5

2.1

(67.4–75.6)

Franklin County, Ohio

715

72.6

2.4

(67.9–77.2)

Hamilton County, Ohio

718

72.5

2.6

(67.4–77.6)

Lucas County, Ohio

652

63.8

3.3

(57.3–70.3)

Mahoning County, Ohio

656

67.2

3.9

(59.5–74.8)

Montgomery County, Ohio

658

75.5

2.6

(70.3–80.6)

Stark County, Ohio

666

72.3

3.1

(66.3–78.4)

Summit County, Ohio

673

73.7

2.7

(68.3–79.0)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

493

57.0

3.4

(50.3–63.6)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,477

57.0

1.8

(53.5–60.6)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,696

58.4

1.8

(54.9–61.9)

Clackamas County, Oregon

541

58.8

2.9

(53.1–64.5)

Lane County, Oregon

643

52.9

2.8

(47.4–58.4)

Multnomah County, Oregon

1,040

54.8

2.1

(50.7–59.0)

Washington County, Oregon

692

56.1

2.7

(50.9–61.3)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

1,388

70.8

1.6

(67.6–74.0)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,470

77.7

1.5

(74.8–80.6)

Kent County, Rhode Island

975

78.3

1.9

(74.6–82.0)

Providence County, Rhode Island

3,957

74.8

1.1

(72.7–77.0)

Washington County, Rhode Island

793

74.6

2.3

(70.1–79.0)

Aiken County, South Carolina

604

66.1

2.8

(60.6–71.6)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

853

65.1

3.0

(59.2–71.0)

Charleston County, South Carolina

949

63.4

2.6

(58.3–68.4)

Greenville County, South Carolina

848

63.8

2.5

(59.0–68.7)

Horry County, South Carolina

794

62.2

2.4

(57.6–66.8)

Orangeburg County, South Carolina

522

68.7

3.3

(62.3–75.1)

Richland County, South Carolina

903

70.9

2.6

(65.9–75.9)

Spartanburg County, South Carolina

574

60.9

3.1

(54.9–67.0)

Brookings County, South Dakota

493

57.2

4.6

(48.1–66.2)

Brown County, South Dakota

523

65.7

3.9

(58.1–73.2)

Codington County, South Dakota

503

64.5

7.0

(50.8–78.2)

Hughes County, South Dakota

539

65.2

3.7

(57.9–72.6)

Lawrence County, South Dakota

527

58.5

3.7

(51.2–65.8)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

758

65.7

2.6

(60.5–70.8)

Pennington County, South Dakota

643

59.0

3.5

(52.2–65.8)

Bexar County, Texas

1,048

61.6

2.5

(56.7–66.6)

Eastland County, Texas

594

67.9

6.0

(56.1–79.7)

Fort Bend County, Texas

937

67.3

3.4

(60.7–74.0)

Harris County, Texas

1,493

60.5

1.7

(57.1–64.0)

Lubbock County, Texas

746

64.6

4.5

(55.9–73.4)

Midland County, Texas

536

63.4

7.1

(49.4–77.4)

Smith County, Texas

563

56.8

5.3

(46.4–67.2)

Tarrant County, Texas

566

61.9

2.7

(56.5–67.3)

Travis County, Texas

1,039

61.4

2.7

(56.1–66.8)

Davis County, Utah

1,150

58.6

1.8

(55.1–62.2)

Salt Lake County, Utah

4,119

55.0

1.0

(53.0–57.0)

Tooele County, Utah

598

63.0

3.0

(57.1–68.9)

Utah County, Utah

1,611

51.1

1.7

(47.7–54.5)

Wasatch County, Utah

492

56.4

3.5

(49.4–63.3)

Weber County, Utah

994

59.7

2.0

(55.8–63.5)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,527

61.4

1.7

(58.0–64.8)

Rutland County, Vermont

729

68.6

2.5

(63.8–73.5)

Washington County, Vermont

672

72.8

2.5

(67.8–77.7)

Windham County, Vermont

558

64.8

2.8

(59.3–70.4)

Windsor County, Vermont

679

70.6

2.5

(65.8–75.5)

Clark County, Washington

631

58.1

2.7

(52.7–63.5)

King County, Washington

3,290

61.0

1.4

(58.3–63.7)

Pierce County, Washington

956

65.7

2.2

(61.5–69.9)

Snohomish County, Washington

876

58.3

2.5

(53.5–63.2)

Spokane County, Washington

1,308

59.6

2.6

(54.5–64.6)

Thurston County, Washington

488

61.2

3.4

(54.6–67.8)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

637

72.5

2.3

(68.0–77.0)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,122

71.6

2.5

(66.6–76.6)

Fremont County, Wyoming

501

49.7

3.4

(43.0–56.4)

Laramie County, Wyoming

1,113

57.5

2.3

(52.9–62.1)

Natrona County, Wyoming

849

54.1

2.4

(49.3–58.9)

Median

66.5

Range

45.6–82.8

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.


TABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

2,513

62.6

1.2

(60.2–65.0)

Alaska

590

51.8

2.9

(46.2–57.4)

Arizona

2,423

58.8

1.7

(55.5–62.1)

Arkansas

1,753

57.3

1.5

(54.4–60.2)

California

4,879

57.2

1.0

(55.3–59.1)

Colorado

3,820

65.9

1.0

(64.0–67.8)

Connecticut

1,974

60.2

1.4

(57.4–63.0)

Delaware

1,512

63.4

1.8

(59.9–66.9)

District of Columbia

1,342

56.7

1.8

(53.3–60.2)

Florida

4,392

57.6

1.1

(55.4–59.8)

Georgia

2,942

55.2

1.2

(52.9–57.5)

Hawaii

2,420

64.7

1.4

(61.9–67.5)

Idaho

1,824

56.3

1.6

(53.2–59.4)

Illinois

1,726

54.7

1.6

(51.6–57.9)

Indiana

2,510

60.6

1.2

(58.2–63.0)

Iowa

2,312

70.2

1.2

(67.9–72.5)

Kansas

6,478

67.6

0.7

(66.3–69.0)

Kentucky

3,190

64.2

1.3

(61.6–66.8)

Louisiana

3,537

70.2

1.1

(68.1–72.3)

Maine

4,129

61.6

0.9

(59.8–63.4)

Maryland

2,713

62.8

1.3

(60.2–65.4)

Massachusetts

5,741

66.9

1.0

(65.0–68.8)

Michigan

3,449

58.0

1.2

(55.6–60.4)

Minnesota

3,537

63.6

1.1

(61.5–65.8)

Mississippi

2,861

65.4

1.1

(63.2–67.6)

Missouri

2,050

63.1

1.4

(60.4–65.8)

Montana

3,078

55.9

1.3

(53.3–58.5)

Nebraska

8,185

61.8

0.8

(60.3–63.3)

Nevada

1,510

53.7

2.3

(49.2–58.3)

New Hampshire

1,897

57.4

1.4

(54.8–60.1)

New Jersey

3,999

61.3

1.1

(59.0–63.5)

New Mexico

2,712

58.8

1.2

(56.5–61.1)

New York

1,949

60.0

1.4

(57.3–62.8)

North Carolina

3,637

66.6

1.2

(64.2–69.0)

North Dakota

1,519

58.0

1.5

(55.0–60.9)

Ohio

2,869

61.4

1.2

(59.1–63.8)

Oklahoma

2,860

62.4

1.1

(60.3–64.6)

Oregon

1,858

54.2

1.4

(51.4–56.9)

Pennsylvania

3,315

62.6

1.1

(60.4–64.7)

Rhode Island

1,881

56.6

1.4

(53.9–59.3)

South Carolina

4,092

65.2

1.1

(63.0–67.3)

South Dakota

2,654

68.3

1.7

(64.9–71.7)

Tennessee

2,037

67.7

2.0

(63.7–71.7)

Texas

4,696

59.1

1.2

(56.7–61.5)

Utah

2,876

56.9

1.1

(54.6–59.1)

Vermont

2,150

65.4

1.2

(63.0–67.8)

Virginia

1,753

63.3

1.6

(60.3–66.4)

Washington

4,979

60.7

1.0

(58.7–62.6)

West Virginia

1,578

68.5

1.4

(65.9–71.2)

Wisconsin

1,438

56.5

1.9

(52.8–60.3)

Wyoming

1,921

54.5

1.7

(51.1–57.9)

Guam

196

39.2

4.2

(31.0–47.5)

Puerto Rico

2,115

28.6

1.2

(26.3–30.9)

Median

60.7

Range

28.6–70.2

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.


TABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Abbeville, Louisiana

171

70.3

3.8

(62.9–77.7)

Aberdeen, South Dakota

201

61.7

7.7

(46.7–76.7)

Akron, Ohio

245

57.8

4.2

(49.5–66.0)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

846

60.9

2.0

(56.9–64.9)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

322

60.1

4.3

(51.6–68.5)

Anchorage, Alaska

195

54.5

4.8

(45.2–63.9)

Asheville, North Carolina

234

69.7

3.5

(62.9–76.6)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

1,015

54.6

2.0

(50.6–58.6)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

308

59.1

3.5

(52.1–66.0)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

375

63.9

3.4

(57.3–70.5)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

324

63.9

3.1

(57.8–70.0)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

355

66.7

4.7

(57.5–75.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

934

64.3

2.0

(60.4–68.2)

Bangor, Maine

328

63.4

3.3

(56.9–70.0)

Barnstable Town, Massachusetts

205

64.1

4.0

(56.3–72.0)

Barre, Vermont

218

67.8

4.1

(59.7–75.8)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

330

70.3

3.1

(64.3–76.4)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland*

432

68.5

3.0

(62.5–74.4)

Billings, Montana

363

59.9

3.3

(53.4–66.5)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

426

66.2

2.8

(60.8–71.6)

Bismarck, North Dakota

290

58.1

3.5

(51.3–65.0)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

405

60.2

3.4

(53.4–66.9)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts*

1,475

65.6

1.9

(61.9–69.3)

Boulder, Colorado

158

59.7

4.8

(50.3–69.1)

Bozeman, Montana

132

46.9

5.8

(35.5–58.3)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

474

58.7

3.0

(52.9–64.5)

Brookings, South Dakota

162

65.8

5.7

(54.6–77.0)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

144

62.3

4.6

(53.2–71.3)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

533

67.0

2.4

(62.4–71.7)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts*

1,027

71.9

2.1

(67.8–75.9)

Camden, New Jersey*

574

64.7

2.5

(59.8–69.6)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

237

65.5

3.9

(57.8–73.1)

Casper, Wyoming

234

53.7

4.2

(45.5–61.9)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

219

69.6

3.9

(62.0–77.1)

Charleston, West Virginia

274

70.5

3.3

(64.0–76.9)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

512

66.4

3.0

(60.5–72.3)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

502

61.9

2.8

(56.4–67.4)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

221

62.3

5.7

(51.1–73.4)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

328

63.5

3.5

(56.6–70.5)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

1,013

53.8

2.2

(49.4–58.1)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

541

61.4

2.8

(55.9–66.8)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

316

67.9

3.1

(61.8–74.1)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

356

65.6

3.1

(59.6–71.6)

Columbia, South Carolina

460

67.7

3.3

(61.2–74.1)

Columbus, Nebraska

209

58.4

3.9

(50.8–66.0)

Columbus, Ohio

331

67.5

3.2

(61.2–73.8)

Concord, New Hampshire

213

54.5

4.0

(46.7–62.3)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas*

189

61.1

4.6

(52.2–70.1)


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois

169

61.8

6.3

(49.4–74.2)

Dayton, Ohio

255

62.2

4.0

(54.4–70.0)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

1,456

71.5

1.5

(68.7–74.4)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

373

78.3

2.4

(73.5–83.1)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan*

548

49.7

3.3

(43.3–56.2)

Dover, Delaware

434

59.3

3.3

(52.8–65.8)

Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin

175

56.1

4.5

(47.3–64.9)

Durham, North Carolina

285

73.3

4.4

(64.7–81.9)

Edison, New Jersey*

780

64.0

2.3

(59.6–68.5)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

206

51.0

4.1

(42.9–59.1)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

187

65.8

4.2

(57.6–74.1)

Fairbanks, Alaska

99

44.8

6.0

(33.0–56.6)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

262

70.7

3.9

(63.0–78.3)

Farmington, New Mexico

217

60.9

4.3

(52.4–69.4)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

272

64.4

4.4

(55.9–73.0)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

191

68.4

3.8

(61.0–75.8)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

158

62.4

4.3

(53.9–70.9)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas*

199

61.0

4.0

(53.1–68.9)

Grand Island, Nebraska

346

64.4

2.9

(58.8–70.0)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

255

64.5

4.4

(55.9–73.2)

Great Falls, Montana

217

65.1

3.8

(57.6–72.6)

Greeley, Colorado

143

61.3

4.8

(51.9–70.8)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

395

61.5

4.2

(53.3–69.7)

Greenville, South Carolina

336

67.0

3.5

(60.1–73.9)

Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi

148

65.6

4.6

(56.5–74.7)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

201

59.4

4.4

(50.8–68.0)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

757

59.6

2.4

(55.0–64.3)

Hastings, Nebraska

238

73.7

3.2

(67.4–79.9)

Havre, Montana

158

42.0

4.9

(32.3–51.7)

Heber, Utah

134

57.9

4.7

(48.8–67.1)

Helena, Montana

214

54.0

4.2

(45.8–62.1)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

205

74.3

3.6

(67.3–81.3)

Hilo, Hawaii

465

60.0

3.2

(53.8–66.3)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

430

61.8

2.8

(56.2–67.3)

Honolulu, Hawaii

1,208

66.0

1.8

(62.4–69.5)

Houma-Bayou Cane-Thibodaux, Louisiana

175

72.7

4.5

(63.9–81.5)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

676

56.1

2.8

(50.6–61.5)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

224

67.9

4.1

(60.0–75.9)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

136

54.6

5.6

(43.7–65.5)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

576

58.5

2.8

(53.0–63.9)

Jackson, Mississippi

234

68.4

3.6

(61.3–75.5)

Jacksonville, Florida

305

63.6

3.6

(56.5–70.7)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

503

62.7

3.0

(56.8–68.6)

Kalispell, Montana

194

62.3

4.7

(53.2–71.5)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

1,974

63.3

1.8

(59.7–66.9)

Kapaa, Hawaii

244

60.4

3.8

(52.9–67.9)

Kearney, Nebraska

199

62.3

4.0

(54.4–70.2)

Keene, New Hampshire

159

61.8

4.4

(53.2–70.4)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

221

54.2

8.2

(38.1–70.3)

Knoxville, Tennessee

210

73.2

5.1

(63.2–83.2)

Lafayette, Louisiana

160

70.6

4.1

(62.6–78.7)

Lake Charles, Louisiana

201

71.0

4.1

(62.9–79.0)


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

229

57.2

3.7

(49.9–64.5)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

528

54.8

3.2

(48.5–61.0)

Lawrence, Kansas

208

72.0

3.5

(65.1–79.0)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

508

65.4

2.5

(60.5–70.3)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

181

49.9

5.0

(40.1–59.7)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

224

64.1

3.7

(56.8–71.4)

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

124

72.9

4.8

(63.5–82.3)

Lincoln, Nebraska

650

64.9

2.1

(60.7–69.0)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

330

64.1

3.3

(57.7–70.5)

Logan, Utah-Idaho

141

59.0

5.0

(49.3–68.8)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California*

736

57.8

2.4

(53.0–62.5)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

774

63.6

3.4

(57.0–70.2)

Lubbock, Texas

304

53.4

3.4

(46.7–60.1)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

408

59.0

2.8

(53.4–64.5)

Manhattan, Kansas

193

77.0

3.3

(70.5–83.4)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

357

69.5

4.1

(61.5–77.4)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

375

53.5

3.3

(47.0–60.0)

Midland, Texas

195

59.7

7.0

(46.1–73.4)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

318

53.6

5.1

(43.6–63.7)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

2,054

65.9

1.5

(63.0–68.8)

Minot, North Dakota

132

59.1

5.1

(49.2–69.0)

Missoula, Montana

191

61.0

4.5

(52.1–69.9)

Mobile, Alabama

215

59.8

4.0

(51.9–67.7)

Monroe, Louisiana

169

63.8

4.3

(55.3–72.3)

Montgomery, Alabama

138

53.4

4.9

(43.7–63.0)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

316

70.3

3.0

(64.5–76.1)

Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro, Tennessee

259

70.7

6.3

(58.3–83.0)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York*

203

56.4

4.3

(48.0–64.8)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania*

979

60.0

2.4

(55.3–64.7)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

425

58.7

3.0

(52.8–64.6)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

627

71.7

2.6

(66.6–76.8)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey*

1,470

61.1

1.9

(57.4–64.7)

Norfolk, Nebraska

246

63.0

3.4

(56.3–69.8)

North Platte, Nebraska

205

52.2

4.0

(44.5–60.0)

Ocean City, New Jersey

258

66.0

3.4

(59.3–72.7)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

504

61.2

2.5

(56.2–66.1)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

798

62.6

2.0

(58.7–66.5)

Olympia, Washington

152

61.5

4.9

(51.8–71.2)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

1,684

63.2

1.8

(59.7–66.8)

Orangeburg, South Carolina

190

57.6

4.3

(49.1–66.0)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

332

52.8

3.4

(46.2–59.4)

Peabody, Massachusetts

732

64.3

2.9

(58.7–70.0)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania*

657

62.0

2.5

(57.1–66.9)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

696

59.9

2.7

(54.6–65.2)

Pierre, South Dakota

183

73.0

5.5

(62.1–83.8)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

773

63.7

2.0

(59.7–67.7)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

1,344

63.3

1.6

(60.2–66.5)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

886

56.8

2.2

(52.5–61.0)


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

2,716

59.1

1.4

(56.5–61.8)

Provo-Orem, Utah

336

56.0

3.1

(49.9–62.0)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

205

64.6

4.4

(56.0–73.1)

Rapid City, South Dakota

390

66.9

4.8

(57.5–76.3)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

472

53.9

3.0

(48.0–59.9)

Richmond, Virginia

255

57.8

3.9

(50.1–65.5)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

529

52.0

2.8

(46.4–57.5)

Riverton, Wyoming

180

49.6

5.0

(39.7–59.4)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire*

497

56.0

2.7

(50.8–61.2)

Rockland, Maine

227

60.4

3.9

(52.7–68.1)

Rutland, Vermont

242

64.2

3.7

(57.0–71.5)

Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, California

355

61.2

3.1

(55.1–67.4)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

785

63.9

2.3

(59.4–68.4)

Salem, Oregon

191

52.1

4.3

(43.7–60.6)

Salt Lake City, Utah

1,101

59.2

1.9

(55.4–63.0)

San Antonio, Texas

400

57.7

3.7

(50.5–65.0)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

492

57.9

2.9

(52.1–63.6)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

647

53.6

2.8

(48.1–59.1)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

222

67.5

4.2

(59.4–75.7)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California*

367

61.0

3.3

(54.5–67.5)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

250

50.5

3.6

(43.3–57.6)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

361

66.2

3.0

(60.3–72.1)

Scranton–Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

169

64.7

4.4

(56.1–73.2)

Seaford, Delaware

540

66.8

2.4

(62.0–71.5)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington*

1,265

60.9

1.8

(57.3–64.5)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

190

73.8

4.0

(66.0–81.5)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

515

80.0

3.3

(73.5–86.5)


TABLE 11. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

MMSA(s)

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

354

66.2

5.3

(55.9–76.5)

Spartanburg, South Carolina

179

62.9

5.4

(52.3–73.5)

Spearfish, South Dakota

196

67.8

5.0

(58.0–77.5)

Spokane, Washington

472

62.4

3.1

(56.3–68.4)

Springfield, Massachusetts

690

69.3

2.7

(64.1–74.5)

Tacoma, Washington*

301

66.8

3.4

(60.1–73.4)

Tallahassee, Florida

169

66.6

4.4

(57.9–75.3)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

388

57.0

3.3

(50.5–63.4)

Toledo, Ohio

232

56.8

4.3

(48.4–65.3)

Topeka, Kansas

594

74.3

2.1

(70.1–78.4)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

146

74.1

4.2

(65.8–82.3)

Tucson, Arizona

323

57.2

3.5

(50.3–64.2)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

788

65.3

2.1

(61.1–69.5)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

149

69.1

4.2

(60.8–77.4)

Tyler, Texas

208

54.8

5.7

(43.7–65.9)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

371

61.9

3.6

(54.8–68.9)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan*

487

57.6

2.7

(52.3–62.9)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia*

1,984

62.8

2.4

(58.1–67.6)

Watertown, South Dakota

181

77.0

4.2

(68.7–85.2)

Wichita, Kansas

1,259

68.5

1.5

(65.5–71.5)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey*

697

62.7

2.4

(58.0–67.5)

Worcester, Massachusetts

650

63.5

3.0

(57.6–69.3)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

309

56.6

4.1

(48.7–64.6)

Median

62.4

Range

42.0–80.0

Abbreviations: MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Metropolitan division.


TABLE 12. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

224

66.5

3.6

(59.4–73.6)

Mobile County, Alabama

215

59.8

4.0

(51.9–67.7)

Anchorage Municipality, Alaska

100

59.7

5.9

(48.1–71.4)

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska

99

44.8

6.1

(32.9–56.7)

Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska

95

41.1

5.3

(30.6–51.5)

Maricopa County, Arizona

503

59.4

2.9

(53.6–65.2)

Pima County, Arizona

323

57.2

3.5

(50.3–64.2)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

213

66.0

3.9

(58.3–73.8)

Alameda County, California

183

56.0

4.9

(46.5–65.5)

Contra Costa County, California

178

56.5

5.6

(45.5–67.6)

Los Angeles County, California

736

57.8

2.4

(53.0–62.5)

Orange County, California

367

61.0

3.3

(54.5–67.5)

Riverside County, California

320

50.9

3.6

(43.9–57.9)

Sacramento County, California

194

60.9

4.3

(52.5–69.2)

San Bernardino County, California

209

54.8

4.5

(45.9–63.6)

San Diego County, California

492

57.9

2.9

(52.2–63.6)

Santa Clara County, California

210

68.1

4.2

(59.8–76.4)

Adams County, Colorado

255

67.6

3.6

(60.5–74.6)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

282

75.6

3.0

(69.8–81.4)

Boulder County, Colorado

158

59.7

4.8

(50.3–69.1)

Denver County, Colorado

285

69.8

3.3

(63.4–76.3)

Douglas County, Colorado

107

66.8

5.3

(56.4–77.2)

El Paso County, Colorado

308

66.1

3.1

(59.9–72.2)

Jefferson County, Colorado

399

73.1

2.5

(68.1–78.1)

Larimer County, Colorado

191

68.4

3.8

(61.0–75.8)

Weld County, Colorado

143

61.3

4.8

(51.9–70.8)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

474

58.7

3.0

(52.9–64.5)

Hartford County, Connecticut

617

60.6

2.6

(55.5–65.7)

New Haven County, Connecticut

425

58.7

3.0

(52.8–64.6)

Kent County, Delaware

434

59.3

3.3

(52.8–65.8)

New Castle County, Delaware

538

62.9

2.8

(57.4–68.5)

Sussex County, Delaware

540

66.8

2.4

(62.0–71.5)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

1,342

56.7

1.7

(53.3–60.1)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

158

46.7

5.5

(36.0–57.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

141

61.3

5.7

(50.2–72.5)

Fulton County, Georgia

154

51.6

5.2

(41.5–61.8)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

465

60.0

3.2

(53.8–66.3)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

1,208

66.0

1.8

(62.4–69.5)

Kauai County, Hawaii

244

60.4

3.8

(52.9–68.0)

Maui County, Hawaii

503

62.7

3.0

(56.8–68.7)

Ada County, Idaho

213

61.8

4.4

(53.2–70.3)

Canyon County, Idaho

133

57.3

6.2

(45.2–69.4)

Cook County, Illinois

439

51.6

3.2

(45.4–57.8)

Lake County, Indiana

244

54.5

4.8

(45.0–64.0)

Marion County, Indiana

416

62.0

3.1

(55.8–68.1)

Linn County, Iowa

198

68.9

3.9

(61.3–76.5)

Polk County, Iowa

285

78.2

2.8

(72.7–83.6)

Douglas County, Kansas

208

72.1

3.6

(65.1–79.1)

Johnson County, Kansas

912

68.0

1.8

(64.4–71.6)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

964

68.1

1.8

(64.6–71.6)

Shawnee County, Kansas

396

74.4

2.5

(69.4–79.3)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

361

64.0

3.3

(57.5–70.5)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

617

67.5

4.4

(59.0–76.1)

Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

184

69.9

4.1

(61.9–77.8)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

183

70.2

4.1

(62.3–78.2)

Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

171

70.3

3.7

(63.0–77.6)

Androscoggin County, Maine

224

64.1

3.7

(56.8–71.4)

Aroostook County, Maine

222

60.6

3.8

(53.1–68.0)


TABLE 12. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2011

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Cumberland County, Maine

697

61.5

2.1

(57.3–65.7)

Franklin County, Maine

164

55.4

4.7

(46.2–64.6)

Hancock County, Maine

209

57.6

4.0

(49.8–65.5)

Kennebec County, Maine

324

63.9

3.1

(57.8–70.0)

Knox County, Maine

227

60.4

3.9

(52.8–68.1)

Lincoln County, Maine

279

62.3

3.6

(55.3–69.3)

Oxford County, Maine

163

57.6

4.4

(48.9–66.2)

Penobscot County, Maine

328

63.4

3.3

(56.9–70.0)

Waldo County, Maine

185

54.5

4.4

(45.9–63.2)

Washington County, Maine

213

62.4

4.3

(53.9–70.9)

York County, Maine

470

66.0

2.7

(60.8–71.3)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

182

69.4

4.0

(61.6–77.3)

Baltimore County, Maryland

288

65.6

3.4

(58.8–72.3)

Frederick County, Maryland

136

60.6

5.5

(49.9–71.4)

Montgomery County, Maryland

296

70.2

3.4

(63.5–76.9)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

216

57.3

4.7

(48.2–66.5)

Baltimore city, Maryland

171

61.0

4.9