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Statistics Overview

Unless otherwise noted, the following data are from CDC’s HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2011; Vol. 23.

Definitions

For more definitions and details about how HIV infection and AIDS data are tabulated, read the "Technical Notes" from the HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2011.

For additional details on HIV disease surveillance, view the Kaiser Family Foundation tutorial: Understanding HIV/AIDS Surveillance Data in the United States.

HIV Prevalence Estimate

Prevalence is the number of people living with HIV infection at a given time, such as at the end of a given year.

At the end of 2009, an estimated 1,148,200 persons aged 13 and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, including 207,600 (18.1%) persons whose infections had not been diagnosed.a

aCDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 U.S. dependent areas—2010. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012;17(No. 3, part A).

HIV Incidence Estimate

Incidence is the number of new HIV infections that occur during a given year. CDC estimates that approximately 50,000 people in the United States are newly infected with HIV each year. In 2010 (the most recent year that data are available), there were an estimated 47,500 new HIV infections.a Nearly two thirds of these new infections occurred in gay and bisexual men. Black/African American men and women were also highly affected and were estimated to have an HIV incidence rate that was almost 8 times as high as the incidence rate among whites. Visit the HIV incidence page for more details.

aCDC. Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007-2010. HIV Supplemental Report 2012). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/slideSets/index.html.

Incidence Infographic

The infographic New HIV Infections in the United States, 2010, is based on incidence numbers from: Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007–2010. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012;17(4).

Diagnoses of HIV Infection

In 2011, the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States was 49,273. There were 38,825 diagnoses in adult and adolescent males and 10,257 in adult and adolescent females. There were an estimated 192 diagnoses of HIV infection among children aged less than 13 years at diagnosis.

Diagnoses of HIV Infection, by Age

In 2011, the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States, by age at diagnosis, was as follows:

Age (Years) Estimated Number of Diagnoses
of HIV Infection, 2011
Under 13 192
Ages 13-14 53
Ages 15-19 2,240
Ages 20-24 8,054
Ages 25-29 7,484
Ages 30-34 6,209
Ages 35-39 5,285
Ages 40-44 5,753
Ages 45-49 5,564
Ages 50-54 3,951
Ages 55-59 2,312
Ages 60-64 1,229
Ages 65 or older 948

Diagnoses of HIV Infection, by Race/Ethnicity

CDC tracks diagnoses of HIV infection information on seven racial and ethnic groups: American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander, white, and multiple races.

In 2011, the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States was as follows:

Race or Ethnicity Estimated Number of Diagnoses
of HIV Infection, 2011
American Indian/Alaska Native 212
Asian 982
Black/African American 23,168
Hispanic/Latinoa 10,159
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 78
White 13,846
Multiple Races 827

aHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

For more details on HIV infection and race/ethnicity, see CDC's Populations and Surveillance fact sheets.

Diagnoses of HIV Infection, by Transmission Category

Six common transmission categories are male-to-male sexual contact, injection drug use, male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use, heterosexual contact, mother-to-child (perinatal) transmission, and other (includes blood transfusions and unknown cause).

The distribution of the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection among adults and adolescents in the United States by transmission category follows. A breakdown by sex is provided where appropriate.

Transmission Category Estimated Number of Diagnoses of HIV Infection, 2011
Adult and Adolescent Males Adult and Adolescent Females Total
Male-to-male sexual contact 30,573 NA 30,573
Injection drug use 2,220 1,428 3,648
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,407 NA 1,407
Heterosexual contacta 4,588 8,814 13,402
Otherb 36 15 51

aHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
bIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk not reported or not identified.

The distribution of the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection among children aged less than 13 years at the time of diagnosis in the United States, by transmission category, follows:

Transmission Category Estimated Number of Diagnoses of HIV Infection, 2011
Perinatal 127
Othera 65

aIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, and risk not reported or not identified.

HIV Diagnoses, by Top 10 States/Dependent Areas

These are the 10 states or dependent areas reporting the highest number of HIV diagnoses in 2011:

State/Dependent Area Number of Diagnoses of HIV Infection, 2011
California 5,973
Florida 5.403
Texas 5,065
New York 4,960
Georgia 2,522
Illinois 2,142
Maryland 1,783
North Carolina 1,672
New Jersey 1,567
Pennsylvania 1,545

Persons Living with a Diagnosis of HIV Infection

At the end of 2010, an estimated 872,990 persons in the United States were living with diagnosed HIV infection.

Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of the stage of disease at diagnosis. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for delays in reporting to the health department (but not for incomplete reporting) and missing transmission category, where appropriate.

Because of delays in reporting of deaths, death and prevalence data are only available through the end of 2010. The exclusion of data from the most recent year allows at least 18 months for deaths to be reported and for these persons to be removed from calculations of persons living with diagnosed HIV infection.

Totals include persons of unknown race/ethnicity. Because totals for the estimated numbers were calculated independently of the values for the subpopulations, the subpopulation values may not equal these totals.

AIDS Diagnoses

In 2011, the estimated number of persons diagnosed with AIDS in the United States was 32,052. Of these, 24,088 AIDS diagnoses were among adult and adolescent males, 7,949 were among adult and adolescent females, and 15 diagnoses were among children aged less than 13 years.

The cumulative estimated number of AIDS diagnoses through 2010 in the United States was 1,155,792.

Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for delays in reporting to the health department (but not for incomplete reporting) and missing transmission category, where appropriate.

Cumulative totals include persons of unknown race/ethnicity. Because totals for the estimated numbers were calculated independently of the values for the subpopulations, the subpopulation values may not equal these totals.

AIDS Diagnoses, by Age

In 2011, the estimated number of AIDS diagnoses in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, by distribution of ages at time of diagnosis, was as follows:

Age (Years) Estimated Number of AIDS Diagnoses, 2011
Under 13 15
Ages 13-14 49
Ages 15-19 510
Ages 20-24 2,425
Ages 25-29 3,433
Ages 30-34 4,001
Ages 35-39 4,071
Ages 40-44 4,783
Ages 45-49 4,994
Ages 50-54 3,567
Ages 55-59 2,198
Ages 60-64 1,107
Ages 65 or older 899

AIDS Diagnoses, by Race/Ethnicity

CDC tracks AIDS information on seven racial and ethnic groups: American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander, white, and multiple races.

In 2011, the estimated number of AIDS diagnoses in the United States, by race or ethnicity was as follows:

Race or Ethnicity Estimated Number of AIDS Diagnoses, 2011 Cumulative Estimated Number of AIDS Diagnoses, Through 2011a
American Indian/Alaska Native 146 3,787
Asianb 492 9,054
Black/African American 15,958 486,282
Hispanic/Latinoc 6,355 202,182
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 47 901
White 8,304 435,613
Multiple Races 750 17,804

aFrom the beginning of the epidemic through 2011.
bIncludes Asian/Pacific Islander legacy cases.
cHispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

For more details on AIDS and race/ethnicity, see CDC's fact sheets.

AIDS Diagnoses, by Transmission Category

CDC collect HIV and AIDS data using six common transmission categories: male-to-male sexual contact, injection drug use, male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use, heterosexual contact, mother-to-child (perinatal) transmission, and other (includes blood transfusions and unknown cause).

The distribution of the estimated number of AIDS diagnoses among adults and adolescents in the United States, by transmission category, follows. A breakdown by sex is provided where appropriate.

Transmission Category Estimated Number of AIDS Diagnoses, 2011
Adult and Adolescent Males Adult and Adolescent Females Total
Male-to-male sexual contact 16,694 NA 16,694
Injection drug use 2,346 1,615 3961
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 1,392 NA 1,392
Heterosexual contacta 3,526 6,206 9,732
Otherb 131 129 260

aHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
bIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk not reported or not identified.

Transmission Category Cumulative Estimated Number of AIDS Diagnoses, Through 2010a
Adult and Adolescent Males Adult and Adolescent Females Total
Male-to-male sexual contact 555,032 NA 555,032
Injection drug use 187,938 89,800 277,738
Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 80,902 NA 80,902
Heterosexual contactb 77,521 136,675 214,196
Otherc 11,975 6,427 18,402

aFrom the beginning of the epidemic through 2011.
bHeterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
cIncludes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk not reported or not identified.

Persons Living with an AIDS Diagnosis

At the end of 2010, an estimated 487,692 persons in the United States were living with an AIDS diagnosis.

Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for delays in reporting to the health department (but not for incomplete reporting) and missing transmission category, where appropriate.

Because of delays in reporting of deaths, data are only available through the end of 2010. The exclusion of data from the most recent year allows at least 18 months for deaths to be reported and for these persons to be removed from calculations of persons living with an AIDS diagnosis.

Totals include persons of unknown race/ethnicity. Because totals for the estimated numbers were calculated independently of the values for the subpopulations, the subpopulation values may not equal these totals.

Deaths of Persons with an AIDS Diagnosis

In 2010, the estimated number of deaths of persons ever receiving a diagnosis of AIDS in the United States was 15,529.

The cumulative estimated number of deaths of persons with an AIDS diagnosis in the United States, through 2010, was 636,048.

Deaths of persons with an AIDS diagnosis may be due to any cause.

Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for delays in reporting to the health department (but not for incomplete reporting) and missing transmission category, where appropriate. Because of delays in reporting of deaths, data are only available through the end of 2010. The exclusion of data from the most recent year allows at least 18 months for deaths of persons with an AIDS diagnosis to be reported.

Totals include persons of unknown race/ethnicity. Because totals for the estimated numbers were calculated independently of the values for the subpopulations, the subpopulation values may not equal these totals.

State-by-State HIV infection and AIDS Data

International Statistics

HIV disease continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. Worldwide, there were about 2.5 million new cases of HIV in 2011. About 34.2 million people are living with HIV around the world. In 2010, there were about 1.8 million deaths in persons with AIDS, and nearly 30 million people with AIDS have died worldwide since the epidemic began. Even though Sub-Saharan Africa bears the biggest burden of HIV/AIDS, countries I South and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and those in Latin America are significantly affected by HIV and AIDS. CDC’s Global AIDS web site explains what CDC is doing in countries where HIV and AIDS have had great impact. Other resources for international HIV and AIDS statistics:

 


 

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