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Guideline for the Prevention and Control of Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Healthcare Settings, 2011

GRADE Table Q1 What person, virus or environmental characteristics increase or decrease the risk of norovirus infection in healthcare settings?

Person characteristics

Virus characteristics

Comparison Outcome Quantity and type of evidence Findings Starting grade Decrease GRADE Increase GRADE GRADE of Evidence for Outcome Overall GRADE of Evidence Base
S
t
u
d
y
 
Q
u
a
l
i
t
y
**
C
o
n
s
i
s
t
e
n
c
y
**
D
i
r
e
c
t
n
e
s
s
**
P
r
e
c
i
s
i
o
n
**
P
u
b
l
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
 
B
i
a
s
**
L
a
r
g
e
 
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
**
D
o
s
e
-
r
e
s
p
o
n
s
e
C
o
n
f
o
u
n
d
e
r
s
Virus characteristics Duration of illness* 1 OBS 57 Community acquired norovirus was an independent risk factor for increased duration of vomiting in 1 OBS in the healthcare setting 57 Low 0 0 0 −1 0 0 0 0 Very Low Very Low
Acute kidney disease 1 OBS 57 Community acquired norovirus was a possible risk factor for an increase in creatinine 57 Low 0 0 0 −1 0 0 0 0 Low
Undefined norovirus infections* 3 DES 108-110 An increase in norovirus activity coincided with the emergence of a new GII-4 variantin 1 DES 109
 
GII-3a strain was identified in 100% symptomatic patients while GII-4 was identified in 27% asymptomatic patients and staff in 1 DES 110
 
G-II.4 strain was the predominant strain associated with outbreaks of norovirus in Australia in 1 DES 108
Very Low 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 very Low

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