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Frequently Asked Questions

Acronyms and Terminology

Acronyms and abbreviations commonly used in DPRP FAQs

Frequently used terms in DPRP FAQs

FAQs

How does the CDC recognize and support organizations that deliver the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention?

How can an organization prepare to participate in the DPRP?

Why should an organization apply to be recognized by the DPRP?

How long does it take to complete and process the application?

What format should be used to submit an alternative curriculum?

What is the process for earning recognition in the DPRP?

What does “pending recognition” status mean?

What would cause an organization’s application to be rejected?

Can an organization lose its recognition status?

If an application is rejected, is there an appeals process?

Where can an individual or organization find the DPRP-recommended lifestyle curriculum?

How are supporting documents for an application submitted to DPRP?

Once an organization’s lifestyle change program satisfies the requirements for full recognition, how long does that designation last?

Once an organization is recognized by DPRP, will health insurance companies reimburse participants covered by their policies?

Is any information on participants required for a new application?

When does reporting start and how long does it continue?

How should an organization send its evaluation data reports about participant progress in the lifestyle classes to DPRP?

What information is needed for the reports?

Will DPRP, CDC, or anyone else be able to find out personal information from the evaluation data reports?

Is there a spreadsheet template available for my organization to use when recording session data?

If a participant wishes to make up a session by attending the same class in a different core group, is this allowed?

Acronyms and abbreviations commonly used in DPRP FAQs

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

DDT Division of Diabetes Translation (part of CDC)

DPP Diabetes Prevention Program (research trial)

DPRP Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program

DPRP Standards
CDC Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program Standards and Operating Procedures
(training and specifications manual for the lifestyle intervention)

DTTAC Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center

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Frequently used terms in DPRP FAQs:

Community organization: employer or group in a community, such as a YMCA, that offers the lifestyle intervention.

Lifestyle class: The 16-core sessions and 6-post-core sessions attended by participants in the lifestyle change program offered by an organization.

Lifestyle coach: Person trained to lead the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle classes.

Lifestyle intervention: Lifestyle change program offered by an organization.

Participant: Person with prediabetes or at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes who is enrolled in a lifestyle class.

Prediabetes: Condition in which an individual has a blood glucose level higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. A person with prediabetes has an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Site: Physical location in which a lifestyle class meets.

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FAQs

How does the CDC recognize and support organizations that deliver the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention?

CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation established the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) to assure that the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention is delivered effectively and consistently across participating sites. Organizations interested in offering lifestyle classes can apply for recognition through DPRP. CDC will provide recognized programs listed in the DPRP registry with supportive tools, including performance analysis, training, and technical assistance. This assistance should improve the classes and help with the required reporting of program evaluation data. For more information, please contact DPRP.Ask@cdc.gov.

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How can an organization prepare to participate in the DPRP?

A community organization considering whether to offer the lifestyle change program can prepare by:

  • Reviewing the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculumon the CDC Web site.
  • Using the capacity assessment test in the DPRP Standards to assess its current ability to offer the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle change program.
  • Identifying potential lifestyle coaches affiliated with the organization and contacting DTTAC for assistance in training a coach using DTTAC master trainers.

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Why should an organization apply to be recognized by the DPRP?

Among the many good reasons to apply include the following:

  • Recognition by DPRP assures potential participants and others that the organization delivers an effective, high-quality, evidence-based lifestyle change program.
  • A health care provider may be more likely to refer patients who are at high risk for prediabetes to a DPRP-recognized program.
  • CDC offers technical assistance to DPRP-recognized organizations.
    • Helps improve the quality of the lifestyle intervention.
    • Helps the organization to achieve and maintain "full recognition" status.
  • Contact information for recognized organizations will be published on this Web site in the DPRP National Registry of Recognized Diabetes Prevention Programs.
    • Helps an interested person to find local organizations offering lifestyle change programs.
  • A growing number of insurance companies are working with employers to offer the National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention as a covered benefit to employees. Insurers may be more likely to reimburse organizations that deliver programs that have received CDC recognition because DPRP assures fidelity to the evidence underlying the program and outcomes.

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How long does it take to complete and process the application?

It should take about 60 minutes to read the DPRP Standards and fill out the application. If the applicant organization is using the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum, DPRP will notify the organization about whether or not its application has been approved within 15 working days. If the applicant organization proposes to use an alternate curriculum, DPRP staff will notify the organization within 30 working days from the date that the alternate curriculum is received by DPRP staff.

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What format should be used to submit an alternative curriculum?

Alternative curriculum may be submitted via zip or pdf format.

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What is the process for earning recognition in the DPRP?

As soon as a new application has been approved, DPRP will assign the applicant organization "pending recognition" status and list it in the National Registry of Recognized Diabetes Prevention Programs. (The specific requirements for "pending" and "full" recognition status are described in DPRP Standards document available on this site.)

After an organization receives pending recognition status, it is required to submit an evaluation data report to DPRP every 6 months with information about how participants in its classes are progressing toward intervention goals. DPRP will determine whether an organization receives "full recognition" status by evaluating the information from these reports over the first 24 months of the lifestyle classes, as detailed in the DPRP Standards.

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What does "pending recognition" status mean?

Pending recognition means that an organization's application has been approved by DPRP.

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What would cause an organization’s application to be rejected?

An application may be rejected because of the following:

  • The application was incomplete or improperly completed.
  • The lifestyle program curriculum submitted with the application (if the organization chooses to use an alternative to the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum) did not meet the requirements established by DPRP and was not approved.

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Can an organization lose its recognition status?

Recognition status will be assessed 24 months after the first session. The organization must achieve all of the requirements (5–12) described in the "Requirements for Pending and Full Recognition" section of the DPRP Standards. If, after 24 months, the organization has not achieved all of the requirements for full recognition, it will remain in pending recognition status for an additional 12 months. During this period, DPRP will provide technical assistance to the organization to help it achieve full recognition. If the organization has not achieved full recognition at the end of this period, it will lose pending recognition and must wait 12 months before reapplying for recognition.

If DPRP does not receive the first evaluation data submission within 12 months of an organization’s acceptance date, DPRP will send a second email reminder to the organization’s contact person. If the first evaluation data submission is not received within 18 months, the organization will lose recognition and will be removed from the DPRP Registry. After the first evaluation data submission, if subsequent data submissions are not received by DPRP within four weeks of the due date, the organization will lose recognition and will be removed from the DPRP registry.

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If an application is rejected, is there an appeals process?

If an application is rejected because the form was completed improperly, then the organization can correct any errors and resubmit the application to DPRP.

If an application was rejected because an alternative curriculum was not approved by DPRP, no appeal is possible. However, the organization can reapply to DPRP if it agrees to use the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculumor submits another curriculum that is approved by DPRP. The DTTAC Web site provides more information about how to offer an effective lifestyle change program.

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Where can an individual or organization find the DPRP-recommended lifestyle curriculum?

The National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum is available is available on this site.

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How are supporting documents for an application submitted to DPRP?

After submitting the electronic application form on this Web site, the organization will receive a confirmation e-mail. This e-mail will include instructions for submitting an alternative curriculum, if the organization chooses to use one. DPRP staff will review the alternative curriculum along with the application. DPRP will notify the organization by e-mail whether or not its application has been approved within 30 working days of receiving its alternative curriculum. No other supporting documents are required.

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Once an organization’s lifestyle change program satisfies the requirements for full recognition, how long does that designation last?

An organization’s full recognition status will be reevaluated every 24 months, as detailed in the DPRP Standards.

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Once an organization is recognized by DPRP, will health insurance companies reimburse participants covered by their policies?

That decision is entirely up to the insurer. DPRP recognition does not guarantee that an insurer will decide to cover the cost of the lifestyle change program.

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Is any information on participants required for a new application?

No.

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When does reporting start and how long does it continue?

After an organization has applied for and been approved for pending recognition status, it will need to send its first evaluation data report on participant progress six months after the starting date of the first lifestyle class. All DPRP-recognized organizations (pending or full recognition) must send evaluation data to DPRP every six months. Each data-submission must include information from all participants in all of the lifestyle classes held during the preceding 6 months, as detailed in the DPRP Standards.

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How should an organization send its evaluation data reports about participant progress in the lifestyle classes to DPRP?

Once an organization’s application has been accepted, DPRP will send an e-mail to the organization’s contact person with instructions for submitting the evaluation data. The e-mail will include an organization code (assigned by DPRP) unique to that organization.

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What information is needed for the reports?

Information is required on participants for all of the data elements listed in the DPRP Standards. This information must be reported to DPRP every 6 months.

Transmitted data must conform to the specifications in the data dictionary included in the DPRP Standards. The variable names, codes, and values, contained in the data dictionary must be used. Applicant organizations should take time to become familiar with all of the data elements and specifications.

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Will DPRP, CDC, or anyone else be able to find out personal information from the evaluation data reports?

No. The evaluation data report will include no information that could be used to identify individual participants or lifestyle coaches. Any information on individual participants or lifestyle coaches will be maintained by the community organization offering the class.

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Is there a spreadsheet template available for my organization to use when recording session data?

Here is a sample spreadsheet [CSV–1 KB] template and Data Definition Document [PDF–46 KB] for your organization to use, but is optional.

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If a participant wishes to make up a session by attending the same class in a different core group, is this allowed?

Organizations are discouraged from allowing participants to attend classes with other core groups because it disrupts group cohesion and has the potential to negatively affect group trust and faith in confidentiality. However, if this is done, the class should be recorded using the Core Group Code (ORGCODE), Session Date (DATE), Coach ID (COACH), and Session ID (SESSID) of the session they attended. The SESSTYPE should be ”M” to indicate that it is a make-up session.

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