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About the National Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum

(In English and Spanish)


The Lifestyle Change Curriculum

The National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle training curriculum is based on the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). The DPP was a clinical research study led by the National Institutes of Health and supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This research was published in the February 7, 2002, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. Studies subsequent to the DPP determined how best to implement the program where people live and work.

The one-year lifestyle program is divided into two components:

Core Sessions: The 16, one-hour core sessions are focused on the process of adopting lifestyle changes for healthy eating and physical activity. These sessions are designed to help participants develop lifelong skills for healthy living and reinforce step-by-step change. Groups generally meet with their lifestyle coach each week at the same time and location.

Post-Core Sessions: Following the core phase, participants attend one hour “post-core” sessions on a monthly basis. The post-core sessions are intended to provide additional support and learning opportunities to participants, and help them transition to independently maintaining their lifestyle changes.

The following materials are used in the program:

Participant Notebook (Core) contains worksheets and handouts for participants to use in each of the 16 core sessions of the lifestyle intervention.

Participant Notebook (Post-Core) contains worksheets and handouts for participants to use in the post-core phase of the lifestyle intervention.

Lifestyle Coach Facilitation Guide (Core) step-by-step guide assists lifestyle coaches in facilitating each of the 16 core sessions of the lifestyle program.

Lifestyle Coach Facilitation Guide (Post-Core) is an annotated version of the post-core participant notebook that includes additional facilitation tips for lifestyle coaches.

Additional materials used by participants during the lifestyle intervention include the following:

Food and Activity Tracker log books are for participants to write down daily food intake, physical activity, and weight, which the lifestyle coach reviews to provide feedback to the participant. An example of this resource is My Game Plan [PDF–350KB] from the National Diabetes Education Program, which you can download for free to share, print, and copy.

Fat and Calorie Counter guides support a participants’ ability to track his or her daily fat grams and calorie consumption/intake. An example of this resource is Your Game Plan [PDF–405KB] from the National Diabetes Education Program, which you can download for free to share, print, and copy.

Learn more about fat in different kinds of food here.

Learn more about healthy eating and nutrition here.

Learn more about physical activity here.

For information about offering a lifestyle class in your community or at your work site,
contact DTTAC.

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Guidance from the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) is a key component of the National Diabetes Prevention Program. The purpose of the DPRP is to recognize organizations that have shown that they can effectively deliver a lifestyle change program to prevent type 2 diabetes. The DPRP strongly encourages local organizations to use the evidence based, effective National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum. Organizations that want to use a different curriculum must submit a copy of the curriculum to the DPRP with their application for recognition. This curriculum will be reviewed to ensure that it is effective, evidence based, and contains the key elements of the curriculum from the DPP research trial before recognition is granted.

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Development of the Curriculum

The National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum was developed with funds from CDC by the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center (DTTAC) at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University in collaboration with

  • Ann Albright PhD, RD, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC
  • Kristina Ernst, RN, BSN, CDE, of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC
  • M. Kaye Kramer, DrPH, MPH, BSN, CCRC, director, Diabetes Support Center, University of Pittsburgh
  • Andrea Kriska, PhD, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh
  • Valerie Lawson, MS, RD, LDN, of the YMCA of the USA
  • David G. Marrero, PhD, of the Diabetes Translation Research Center at Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, CDE, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh
  • Elizabeth Venditti, PhD, of the Diabetes Prevention Support Center at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

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