Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Group of people.High blood pressure is a common and dangerous condition. Having high blood pressure means the pressure of the blood in your blood vessels is higher than it should be. But you can take steps to control your blood pressure and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.

About 1 of 3 U.S. adults—or about 70 million people—have high blood pressure.1 Only about half (52%) of these people have their high blood pressure under control.1 This common condition increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, 2 of the leading causes of death for Americans.2 Get more quick facts about high blood pressure, or learn more about high blood pressure in the United States.

High blood pressure is called the "silent killer" because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people do not know they have it. That's why it is important to check your blood pressure regularly.

The good news is that you can take steps to prevent high blood pressure or to control it if your blood pressure is already high.

Featured Items

2016 Vital SignsVital Signs: Blood Pressure Control
Seven out of 10 U.S. adults ages 65 or older have high blood pressure, yet nearly half of these adults don’t have it under control. Taking blood pressure medicine as directed lowers the risk of heart disease and stroke. Health care teams, including doctors, pharmacists, and insurers, can work with patients to make taking medicine easier and help improve blood pressure control.
2015 Million Hearts Hypertension Control ChampionsCDC Announces 2015 Million Hearts® Hypertension Control Champions
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for stroke. Many health care providers, practices, and systems across the nation are focusing on controlling blood pressure. Million Hearts® has recognized 18 Champions who achieved blood pressure control for at least 70% of their adult patients with hypertension. Find out if there is a Champion near you!
African American Family African American Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet
People of all ages, genders, and ethnicities are at risk for heart disease and stroke. However, certain populations, including African Americans, are at higher risk than others. The good news is you can beat these conditions. When it comes to reducing your risk for heart disease and stroke, the decisions you make every day—and can control—play a big role.
Vital Signs Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke
Nearly 1 in 3 deaths in the U.S. each year is caused by heart disease and stroke. At least 200,000 of these deaths could have been prevented through changes in health habits, such as stopping smoking, more physical activity, and less salt in the diet; community changes to create healthier living spaces, such as smoke-free areas and safe places to exercise; and managing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes.
May is High Blood Pressure Education Month When it Comes to Blood Pressure, Make Control Your Goal
Have you talked about a goal for your blood pressure with your health care provider? If not, consider doing so at your next visit. One in three American adults has high blood pressure, also called hypertension. Learn how to make control your goal.
BP Control Make Control Your Goal Infographic
Did you know that 67 million American adults have high blood pressure? That’s 1 in every 3 American adults, and only about half of these individuals have their condition under control. This infographic can help you make blood pressure control your goal, every day.
Self-Measure Blood Pressure Monitoring Million Hearts® Action Guide: Self-Measured Blood Pressure Monitoring [PDF-1M]
Clinicians, public health practitioners, health care systems, and individuals can improve blood pressure control and health outcomes for patients with high blood pressure. Self-measured blood pressuring monitoring is one strategy to reach those objectives.
Food full of sodium. Most Americans Should Consume Less Sodium
Most of the sodium we eat is in the form of salt. Too much sodium is bad for your health. It can increase your blood pressure and your risk for a heart attack or stroke. Heart disease and stroke are the first and fourth killers of men and women in the United States.


  1. Nwankwo T, Yoon SS, Burt V, Gu Q. Hypertension among adults in the US: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012. NCHS Data Brief, No. 133. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Dept of Health and Human Services, 2013.
  2. Farley TA, Dalal MA, Mostashari F, Frieden TR. Deaths preventable in the US by improvements in the use of clinical preventive services. Am J Prev Med. 2010;38:600-9.