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Health Risks and Disparities Experienced by Hispanic Youth
Health Disparities Experienced by Hispanic Children, Youth, and Adults

Disparities Experienced by Hispanic Children/Youth

  • During 2003-2004, 65% of Hispanic children and adolescents were reported by their parents to be in excellent or very good health compared with 90% of white children.1
     

  • During 2003-2004, teeth conditions for 21% of Hispanic children and adolescents were poor or fair compared with 11% of black and 6% of white children.1
     

  • Studies have found that Hispanic youth experience proportionately more anxiety-related behaviors, delinquency, and depression than do non-Hispanic white youth.2-5
     

  • During 2001-2002, 39.9% of Mexican-American males aged 2-19 years were obese or overweight compared to 28.4% of non-Hispanic white males. Among Mexican-American females aged 2-5 years, 31.8% were obese or overweight compared with 18.9% of non-Hispanic white females.6
     

  • During 2004-2006, the overall asthma prevalence rate for children aged 5-17 years was higher for both non-Hispanic whites (9.4%) and for non-Hispanic blacks (13.6%) than for Hispanics (9.2%). However, a large disparity exists within the Hispanic population. Puerto Rican children as a subgroup had an asthma prevalence rate of 21.8% during the same time period.7

Disparities Experienced by Hispanic Adults

  • In 2005, after adjusting for population age differences, Mexican-Americans were 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites.8
     

  • The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer is 85% for non-Hispanic white women, but only 76% for Hispanic women.9
     

  • In 2004, Hispanics were about 3 times more likely to have chlamydia than non-Hispanic whites (436.1/100,000 vs. 143.6/100,000).10
     

  • In 2005, the rate of HIV/AIDS cases among the Hispanic population was more than 3 times greater compared with non-Hispanic whites.11
     

  • The 2006 National Health Interview Survey found that 26.3% of Hispanics lacked health insurance for more than a year, compared with 6.9% of non-Hispanic whites and 10.4% of non-Hispanic blacks.12
     

  • During 2001-2004, Mexican women aged 20-74 years were significantly more likely to be obese compared with non-Hispanic white women (40.3% vs. 30.5%).13
     

  • In 2003, the age-adjusted incidence rate for cervical cancer in Hispanic women was 13.8 per 100,000 population compared with 6.3 for non-Hispanic white women.13


References

  1. Flores G, Tomany-Korman SC. Racial and ethnic disparities in medical and dental health, access to care, and use of services in US children. Pediatrics 2008;121(2):286-298.
     
  2. Glover SH, Pumariega AJ, Holzer CE, Wise BK, Rodriquez M. Anxiety symptomatology in Mexican American adolescents. Journal of Child and Family Studies 1999;(8):47-57.
     
  3. Roberts RE, Chen Y. Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation among Mexican-origin and Anglo adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 1995;(34):81-90.
     
  4. Roberts RE, Roberts C, Chen YR. Ethnocultural differences in prevalence of adolescent depression. American Journal of Community Psychology 1997;(25):95-110.
     
  5. Vazsonyi AT, Flannery D. Early adolescent delinquent behaviors: Associations with family and school domains. Journal of Early Adolescence 1997;(17):271-293.
     
  6. Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Curtin LR, McDowell MA, Tabak CJ, Flegal KM. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States, 1999-2004. JAMA 2006;95(13):1549-1555.
     
  7. CDC. National Center for Health Statistics. Health Data Interactive.  Accessed on September 2008.
     
  8. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet: general information and national estimates on diabetes in the United States, (2005). Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.
     
  9. Abraido-Lanza A, Chao M, Gammon M. Breast and cervical cancer screening among Latinas and non-Latina Whites. American Journal of Public Health 2004;94(8):1393-1398.
     
  10. CDC. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance, 2004, Table 11B. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2005.
     
  11. CDC. HIV/AIDS surveillance report, 2005. Vol. 17. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2006:1-54.
     
  12. Cohen RA, Martinez ME. Health insurance coverage: early release of estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2006. [pdf 328K]
     
  13. CDC. Health, United States; 2006. [pdf 7.73M] Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2006 .

 

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Page last reviewed: December 05, 2008
Page last modified: October 21, 2008
Content source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health

Division of Adolescent and School Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Department of Health and Human Services