Data Visualization: Vaccinating Pregnant Women


Data Visualization: Vaccines often offered, but many pregnant women and babies left unprotected

Vaccines often offered, but many pregnant women and babies left unprotected. Women who report provider offer or referral for flu and Tdap vaccine: Most (75 percent) women reported provider offer or referral for flu and Tdap vaccine and 25 percent reported that they had not been offered or received referral for flu and Tdap vaccine. Flu and Tdap vaccination coverage for pregnant women: Most women reported receiving Tdap during pregnancy (55 percent) or the flu vaccine before/during pregnancy (54 percent). Some (35 percent) women reported receiving both vaccines.

SOURCE: CDC Internet Panel Survey 2019

Text Description:

Vaccines often offered, but many pregnant women and babies left unprotected

Women who report provider offer or referral for flu and Tdap vaccine

Most (75%) women reported provider offer or referral for flu and Tdap vaccine and 25% reported that they had not been offered or received referral for flu and Tdap vaccine.

Flu and Tdap vaccination coverage for pregnant women

Most women reported receiving Tdap during pregnancy (55%) or the flu vaccine before/during pregnancy (54%). Some (35%) women reported receiving both vaccines.


Data Visualization: Women vaccinated during pregnancy pass protective antibodies to babies.

Women vaccinated during pregnancy pass protective antibodies to babies. Graphic of a pregnant woman and the fetus. About 2 weeks after vaccination, the mother develops antibodies to influenza and whooping cough. Antibodies enter the placenta and transfer to the baby.Graphic of a woman holding a baby. The baby is born with antibodies that provide protection against influenza and whooping cough for the first few months of life.

SOURCES: Lancet, April 2017, https://bit.ly/2lNYsgZexternal icon. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, October 2017, https://bit.ly/2monhkeexternal icon.

Text Description:

Women vaccinated during pregnancy pass protective antibodies to babies.

Graphic of a pregnant woman and the fetus

About 2 weeks after vaccination, the mother develops antibodies to influenza and whooping cough.

Antibodies enter the placenta and transfer to the baby.

Graphic of a woman holding a baby

The baby is born with antibodies that provide protection against influenza and whooping cough for the first few months of life.

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Publication date: October 8, 2019

Page last reviewed: October 8, 2019
Content source: Office of the Associate Director for Communication