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Legal Status of EPT in Tennessee

permissibleEPT is permissible.

This is a table caption for compliance. Please ignore it.
I. Statutes/regs on health care providers’ authority to prescribe for STDs to a patient’s partner(s) w/out prior evaluation (Explanation) minus symbol Nurses practicing at primary health centers shall not issue drugs for treatment of STDs without prior examination by physician. Tenn. Code Ann. § 63-7-124(c) (for all other STDs).

plus sign EPT by physicians authorized for chlamydia only. Tenn. Comp. R. & Regs. 1050-2-.13(9)(d), 0880-2-.14(9)

plus sign For the treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis, physicians may provide “an effective and safe treatment to the partners of patients infected with C. trachomatis, who for various reasons may not otherwise receive appropriate treatment.” As such, physicians may “provide to the treated patient non-named signed prescriptions, or dispense to the patient, the appropriate quantity and strength of azithromycin sufficient to provide curative treatment for the total number of unnamed ‘partners’ as defined in subparagraph (b) and indicated by the patient.” Tenn. Comp. R. & Regs. 0880-2-.14(9)(a)-(d)

II. Specific judicial decisions concerning EPT (or like practices) (Explanation)
III. Specific administrative opinions by the Attorney General or medical or pharmacy boards concerning EPT (or like practices) (Explanation)
IV. Laws that incorporate via reference guidelines as acceptable practices (including EPT) (Explanation)
V. Prescription requirements (Explanation)
VI. Assessment of EPT’s legal status with brief comments (Explanation) permissibleEPT is permissible.

Statutory authority allows EPT for the treatment of Chlamydia and is supported by medical board rules recognizing the need to treat the sexual partners of patients.

Status as of August 16, 2006

Legend

plus sign supports the use of EPT

minus symbol negatively affects the use of EPT

permissible EPT is permissible

potentially allowable EPT is potentially allowable

prohibited EPT is prohibited

This is a table caption for compliance. Ignore it please.
permissible EPT is permissible in 42 states: potentially allowable EPT is potentially allowable in 6 states: prohibited EPT is prohibited in 2 states:
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
EPT is permissible in the District of Columbia.
Alabama
Delaware
Kansas
New Jersey
Oklahoma
South Dakota
EPT is potentially allowable in Puerto Rico.
Kentucky
South Carolina

  

Summary Totals

The information presented here is not legal advice, nor is it a comprehensive analysis of all the legal provisions that could implicate the legality of EPT in a given jurisdiction.  The data and assessment are intended to be used as a tool to assist state and local health departments as they determine locally appropriate ways to control STDs.

For comments, feedback and updates, please contact CDC-INFO: https://www.cdc.gov/cdc-info/.

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