Outbreak of Cyclospora Infections Linked to Fresh Basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico

Last Updated AUGUST 15, 2019 4:00 PM EDT

At a Glance

  • Reported laboratory-confirmed cases: 205
  • States: 11; exposures occurred in 5 states
  • Hospitalizations: 5
  • Deaths: 0
  • Recall: Yes

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora infections linked to fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico.

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, Retailers, and Suppliers/Distributors

CDC is advising that consumers do not eat or serve any fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico. This investigation is ongoing and the advice will be updated when more information is available.

  • Consumers who have fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, in their homes should not eat it. Throw the basil away, even if some has been eaten and no one has gotten sick.
    • Do not eat salads or other dishes that include fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico. This includes dishes garnished or prepared with fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, such as salads or fresh pesto.
    • If you aren’t sure the fresh basil you bought is from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, you can ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat the fresh basil. Throw it out.
    • Wash and sanitize places where fresh basil was stored: countertops and refrigerator drawers or shelves. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.
  • The FDA strongly advises importers, suppliers, and distributors, as well as restaurants, retailers, and other food service providers to not sell, serve or distribute fresh basil imported from Siga Logistics de RL de CV located in Morelos, Mexico. If you are uncertain of the source, do not sell, serve or distribute the fresh imported basil.

Take action if you have symptoms of a Cyclospora infection:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Write down what you ate in the two weeks before you started to get sick.
  • Report your illness to the health department.
  • Assist public health investigators by answering questions about your illness.

Latest Outbreak Information

  • Two hundred and five people with laboratory-confirmed Cyclospora infections and who reported eating fresh basil have been reported from 11 states; exposures occurred at restaurants in 5 states (Florida, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, and Wisconsin).
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 10, 2019 to July 18, 2019.
    • Five people have been hospitalized. No deaths attributed to Cyclospora have been reported in this outbreak.
  • Epidemiologic evidence and early product distribution information indicate that fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico is a likely source of this outbreak.
  • This investigation is ongoing. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Investigation Details

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora infections linked to consumption of fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico.

As of August 15, 2019, a total of 205 people with laboratory-confirmed Cyclospora infections associated with this outbreak have been reported from 11 states:  CT (1), FL (50), GA (2), IA (2), MA (1), MN (33), NY (107), OH (3), RI (1), SC (1), and WI (4).  Exposures were reported in 5 states (Florida, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, and Wisconsin).

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 10, 2019 to July 18, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from 15 to 98 years with a median age of 51 and 70% were female. Five (2%) people have been hospitalized. No deaths attributed to Cyclospora have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 4 to 6 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Cyclospora Infection for more details.

There are typically multiple clusters of Cyclospora infections that occur during a given season. It is unknown at this time if other reported cases of Cyclospora infection in the United States this season are linked to fresh basil. This investigation is ongoing.

Investigation of the Outbreak

Epidemiologic evidence and early product distribution information indicate that fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, is a likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. Investigating illness clusters provides critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. In this fresh basil-associated cluster, there were several situations in which people reported eating at the same restaurants.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states are collecting records to determine the source of the fresh basil that ill people ate in the five affected states. Product distribution information available at this time indicates that the fresh basil that made people sick was exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico. This traceback investigation is ongoing to determine the source of contamination. Additional illness clusters are currently under investigation to determine if they are linked to fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico.

Consumers should not eat fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, until we learn more about this outbreak. This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Outbreak by the Numbers

People infected with Cyclospora, and who reported eating basil by state of residence, as of August 15, 2019 (n=205). Data are preliminary and subject to change. Note that the Massachusetts and Connecticut case-patients were exposed in New York State; the Iowa, Rhode Island, and two Wisconsin case-patients were exposed in Minnesota; and the Georgia, South Carolina, one Wisconsin and two Minnesota case-patients were exposed in Florida.

*N=202. Data are current as of 8/15/19. Date of illness onset was not available for 3 cases. Data are preliminary and subject to change. Illnesses that started after 7/4/2019 might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 4 to 6 weeks

 

Onset Date Number of Cases
6/10/2019 1
6/11/2019 0
6/12/2019 0
6/13/2019 0
6/14/2019 1
6/15/2019 3
6/16/2019 2
6/17/2019 3
6/18/2019 5
6/19/2019 9
6/20/2019 10
6/21/2019 5
6/22/2019 8
6/23/2019 9
6/24/2019 14
6/25/2019 22
6/26/2019 11
6/27/2019 12
6/28/2019 8
6/29/2019 6
6/30/2019 9
7/1/2019 11
7/2/2019 8
7/3/2019 12
7/4/2019 3
7/5/2019 8
7/6/2019 6
7/7/2019 3
7/8/2019 2
7/9/2019 2
7/10/2019 1
7/11/2019 2
7/12/2019 2
7/13/2019 1
7/14/2019 0
7/15/2019 1
7/16/2019 0
7/17/2019 1
7/18/2019 1
7/19/2019 0
7/20/2019 0
7/21/2019 0
7/22/2019 0
7/23/2019 0
7/24/2019 0
7/25/2019 0
7/26/2019 0
7/27/2019 0
7/28/2019 0
7/29/2019 0
7/30/2019 0
7/31/2019 0
8/1/2019 0
8/2/2019 0
8/3/2019 0
8/4/2019 0
8/5/2019 0
8/6/2019 0
8/7/2019 0
8/8/2019 0
8/9/2019 0
8/10/2019 0
8/11/2019 0
8/12/2019 0
8/13/2019 0
8/14/2019 0
8/15/2019 0

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora infections linked to consumption of fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico.

As of July 24, 2019, a total of 132 people with laboratory-confirmed Cyclospora infections associated with this outbreak have been reported from 11 states:  CT (1), FL (22), GA (2), IA (2), MA (1), MN (29), NY (69), OH (3), RI (1), SC (1), and WI (1).  Exposures were reported at restaurants in 4 states (Florida, Minnesota, New York, and Ohio).

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 14, 2019 to July 9, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from 19 to 98 years with a median age of 54. Of 96 people with available information, 74 % were female. Four (3%) have been hospitalized. No deaths attributed to Cyclospora have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 4 to 6 weeks.

There are typically multiple clusters of Cyclospora infections that occur during a given season. It is unknown at this time if other reported cases of Cyclospora infection in the United States this season are linked to fresh basil. This investigation is ongoing.

Investigation of the Outbreak

Epidemiologic evidence and early product distribution information indicate that fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, is a likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. Investigating illness clusters provides critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. In this fresh basil-associated cluster, several ill people reported eating at the same restaurants.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states are collecting records to determine the source of the fresh basil that ill people ate in the four affected states. Early product distribution information available at this time indicates that the fresh basil that made people sick was from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico. This traceback investigation is ongoing to determine the source of contamination. Additional illness clusters are currently under investigation to determine if they are linked to fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico.

Consumers should not eat fresh basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico, until we learn more about this outbreak. This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Outbreak by the Numbers

People infected with Cyclospora, and who reported eating basil by state of residence, as of July 24, 2019 (n=132). Data are preliminary and subject to change. Note that the Massachusetts and Connecticut case-patients were exposed in New York State; the Iowa and Rhode Island case-patients were exposed in Minnesota; and the Georgia, South Carolina, Wisconsin and one Minnesota case-patients were exposed in Florida.

*N=128. Data are current as of 7/24/19. Date of illness onset was not available for 4 cases. Data are preliminary and subject to change. Illnesses that started after 6/12/2019 might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 4 to 6 weeks

 

Onset Date Number of Cases
6/14/2019 1
6/15/2019 0
6/16/2019 1
6/17/2019 3
6/18/2019 4
6/19/2019 4
6/20/2019 4
6/21/2019 3
6/22/2019 5
6/23/2019 6
6/24/2019 11
6/25/2019 13
6/26/2019 8
6/27/2019 10
6/28/2019 7
6/29/2019 4
6/30/2019 7
7/1/2019 8
7/2/2019 5
7/3/2019 11
7/4/2019 3
7/5/2019 4
7/6/2019 4
7/7/2019 0
7/8/2019 1
7/9/2019 1
7/10/2019 0
7/11/2019 0
7/12/2019 0
7/13/2019 0
7/14/2019 0
7/15/2019 0
7/16/2019 0
7/17/2019 0
7/18/2019 0
7/19/2019 0
7/20/2019 0
7/21/2019 0
7/22/2019 0
7/23/2019 0
7/24/2019 0
7/25/2019 0
Page last reviewed: August 16, 2019