Strategize and Act

Collaborate with Worksite Wellness Staff

Building relationships with worksite wellness staff can be a successful entry point for food service guidelines implementation. Worksite wellness staff are credentialed professionals such as registered dietitians who are trained to maintain employee health and have the responsibility for implementing programs and making environmental changes that promote health and well-being.

Man in front of a laptop

Worksite wellness staff often have direct access to organizational leadership and can more easily obtain buy-in from leaders to move forward with food service guidelines implementation. They also have established communication channels with staff which they can use to promote the sales of healthy foods and beverages and link health information with healthy eating. Since they are often the champions who are the key to your success, it is important to engage them early in the process.

Worksite wellness staff can also help to adopt food and beverage practices that are related to food service guidelines but are not considered part of food service guideline implementation. For example, they can facilitate putting healthy meeting and breakroom policies into practice at the organizational level. CDC has developed guidance, Tips for Offering Healthier Options and Physical Activity at Workplace Meetings and Events pdf icon[PDF-665KB], that can be used in conjunction with food service guidelines to create a workplace supportive of healthy eating.

Resources

The CDC Worksite Health ScoreCard was developed to help employers determine gaps in the health-promoting interventions within their worksite. Although the nutrition section of the scorecard tool overlaps with the Food Service Guidelines Organizational Assessment Tool pdf icon[PDF-479KB], which is more specific to food service guidelines, the scorecard also assesses strategies for related health behaviors such as physical activity and weight management, and strategies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and stroke, cancer, and more.