Health United States 2020-2021

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

More than a million Americans are currently living with HIV, and the U.S. government spends $20 billion in direct health expenditures for HIV prevention and care annually (1). Although HIV can affect anyone, certain communities and groups are disproportionately impacted (2).

Key Findings

Change: 2015 to 2019
Decrease

The number of new HIV diagnoses per 100,000 population aged 13 years and over decreased 10.8% from 14.8 in 2015 to 13.2 in 2019. In 2019, 36,337 people aged 13 years and over were newly diagnosed with HIV infection in the United States. See Featured Charts for additional analysis.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. See Sources and Definitions, National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) Health, United States, 2020–2021 Table HIV.

Featured Charts

In 2019, among those aged 13 years and over, males were four times more likely to be diagnosed with HIV infection than females.

Figure 1 is a bar graph showing the number of new HIV diagnoses per 100,000 resident population among people aged 13 years and over, by reported sex at birth for 2015 and 2019.

SOURCE: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. See Sources and Definitions, National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) and Health, United States, 2020–2021 Table HIV.

  • Among males aged 13 years and over, the number of new HIV diagnoses per 100,000 population was 11.7% lower in 2019 (21.8) than 2015 (24.7).
  • Among females aged 13 years and over, the number of new HIV diagnoses per 100,000 population was 9.3% lower in 2019 (4.9) than 2015 (5.4).
  • In both 2015 and 2019, the rate of new HIV diagnoses was more than four times higher for males than for females.

From 2015 to 2019, HIV diagnosis rates were higher for non-Hispanic Black people than any other race and Hispanic-origin group.

Figure 2 is a line graph showing the number of new HIV diagnoses per 100,000 resident population among people of all ages, by race and Hispanic origin for 2015 through 2019.

SOURCE: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. See Sources and Definitions, National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) and Health, United States, 2020–2021 Table HIV.

  • The rate of new HIV infection diagnoses in non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native people was higher in 2019 than in 2015, while the rates for all other race and Hispanic-origin groups were lower in 2019 than in 2015.
  • In 2019, the rate of new HIV infection diagnoses per 100,000 population was highest in non-Hispanic Black people (37.3), followed by Hispanic (16.7), non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (11.1), non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (8.6), and non-Hispanic White (4.6) people. The lowest rate of diagnoses was among non-Hispanic Asian people (3.9).

Explore Data

Download the data

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics: United States, 2015–2019

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TP Prevention.


Selected nationally notifiable disease rates and number of new cases: United States, selected years 1950–2019

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.

Definitions

References

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Ending the HIV epidemic: About ending the HIV epidemic in the U.S.: Overview. 2021. Available from: https://www.hiv.gov/federal-response/ending-the-hiv-epidemic/overview.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2019 HIV Surveillance Report 2021. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/hiv-surveillance.html.
Page last reviewed: August 12, 2022