Health United States 2020-2021

International Classification of Diseases (ICD)

Used to code and classify cause-of-death data. ICD is developed collaboratively by the World Health Organization and 10 international centers, one of which is housed at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). ICD promotes international comparability in the collection, classification, processing, and presentation of health statistics. Since 1900, ICD has been modified about once every 10 years, except for the 20-year interval between the 9th and 10th revisions (ICD–9 and ICD–10) (ICD-Table). The purpose of the revisions is to stay up-to-date with advances in medical science. New revisions usually introduce major disruptions in the time series of mortality statistics (see Sources and Definitions, Cause of death). For more information, see the NCHS ICD–10 website at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10.htm. (Also see Sources and Definitions, Cause of death; Comparability ratio; International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification [ICD–CM].)

ICD-Table. Revision of International Classification of Diseases (ICD), by year of conference in which adopted and years in use in United States

ICD-Table. Revision of International Classification of Diseases (ICD), by year of conference in which adopted and years in use in United States
ICD revision Year of conference in which revision adopted Years in use in United States
1st 1900 1900–1909
2nd 1909 1910–1920
3rd 1920 1921–1929
4th 1929 1930–1938
5th 1938 1939–1948
6th 1948 1949–1957
7th 1955 1958–1967
8th 1965 1968–1978
9th 1975 1979–1998
10th 1990 1999–present

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9.htm.

Page last reviewed: August 12, 2022