Bringing an Animal into the United States

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Beginning July 14, 2021, there is a temporary suspension for dogs imported from high-risk countries for dog rabies. CDC has the authority to issue a CDC Dog Import Permit for US citizens and lawful residents relocating from high-risk countries to bring their dogs into the United States. Such permits will be issued on an extremely limited basis.

First 90-Day Transition Process
From July 14 through October 14, 2021, dogs coming from high-risk countries  with CDC Dog Import Permits can enter the United States at one of these 18 airports: Anchorage (ANC), Atlanta (ATL), Boston (BOS), Chicago (ORD), Dallas (DFW), Detroit (DTW), Honolulu (HNL), Houston (IAH), Los Angeles (LAX), Miami (MIA), Minneapolis (MSP), New York (JFK), Newark (EWR), Philadelphia (PHL), San Francisco (SFO), San Juan (SJU), Seattle (SEA), and Washington DC (IAD).

After October 14, 2021, dogs coming from high-risk countries with CDC Dog Import Permits must enter only at approved ports of entry.

All dogs imported into the United States must be healthy on arrival.

Dogs that have not been in a high-risk country in the previous 6 months are not required by CDC to present a rabies vaccination certificate or other paperwork, but vaccination against rabies is recommended.

CDC regulations govern the importation of animals and animal products capable of causing human disease. Pets taken out of the United States are subject upon return to the same regulations as those entering for the first time.

CDC does not require general certificates of health for pets for entry into the United States. However, health certificates may be required for entry into some states or may be required by airlines. Check with officials in the state of final destination and with the airline before your travel date.

CDC is aware that Internet scammers are falsely representing themselves as CDC employees in emails to US citizens. Learn more about internet pet adoption scams.

A CDC public health officer checks the rabies vaccination certificate of a dog in a kennel just arrived into the United States. Photo credit to Derek Sakris, CDC.

Photo credit: Derek Sakris, CDC

Animals Regulated by CDC

Animals NOT Regulated by CDC