BSC Member Profiles

Joanne Martha Bartkus, PhD
Joanne Martha Bartkus, PhD

Director, Public Health Laboratory, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul

Dr. Bartkus received her BS and MS degrees in biology from Northern Illinois University and a PhD in microbiology from Cornell University. As a National Research Council Fellow at the United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases, she conducted research on toxin gene regulation in Bacillus anthracis. Prior to becoming involved in public health, Dr. Bartkus was involved in product development and clinical research in the Infection Prevention Division at 3M Health Care. She has served as the Director of the Public Health Laboratory at the Minnesota Department of Health for 12 years, where she supervises a management team responsible for oversight of environmental testing, infectious disease surveillance and outbreak investigation, newborn screening, and laboratory operations. Dr. Bartkus is board certified in medical microbiology by the American Board of Medical Microbiology and as a High Complexity Laboratory Director by the American Board of Bioanalysis. She is past-president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories and is the Board liaison to the Environmental Health and Knowledge Management committees. Her interests include identification of and response to social, political, and technological trends that may impact the public health laboratory, implementation of advanced technologies for detection of chemical and infectious disease threats and heritable conditions, and continuous improvement of laboratory quality and efficiency.

Alexander Carl Billioux, MD, DPhil
Alexander Carl Billioux

Assistant Secretary of Health, Office of Public Health, Louisiana Department of Health, Baton Rouge

Dr. Billioux is the Louisiana Assistant Secretary for the Office of Public Health, where he oversees the state’s centralized public health system and programs, including Louisiana’s Hepatitis C Elimination Program. He is also a part-time Assistant Professor of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and previously served as Senior Advisor to the Director and Director of the Division of Population Health Incentives and Infrastructure at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI). He was a 2015–2016 White House Fellow, serving in the Department of Health and Human Services under Secretary Sylvia Burwell. He trained in internal medicine on the Osler Medical Service at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and served as Assistant Chief of Service. Dr. Billioux was an Afya Bora Fellow in Global Health Leadership, University of Washington, serving in Uganda and focusing on tuberculosis care. Additionally, he is a Fellow of the America College of Physicians.

Jeffrey S. Duchin, MD
Jeffrey S. Duchin, MD

Health Officer and Chief, Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Immunization Section, Public Health – Seattle & King County, Seattle, Washington

Dr. Duchin is Health Officer and Chief of the Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Immunization Section at Public Health – Seattle & King County, and a nationally recognized leader in public health, infectious diseases, and epidemiology. His work has spanned a broad range of infectious disease topic areas, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, zoonotic diseases, bioterrorism preparedness, vaccine safety, antimicrobial resistance, and outbreak investigation. In addition to his local health department position, Dr. Duchin is Professor in Medicine at the University of Washington and Adjunct Professor in the university’s School of Public Health and has served in a variety of leadership roles at the national, state, and local level. He is a member of the Forum on Microbial Threats at the National Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), serving as the immediate past-chair of IDSA’s Public Health Committee, and continues to be a chief IDSA spokesperson for matters related to pandemic influenza, vaccines, and U.S. public health infrastructure.

Ann Peters Garvey, DVM, MPH, MA
Ann Peters Garvey

State Public Health Veterinarian and Deputy State Epidemiologist, Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines

Dr. Garvey has served as Iowa’s State Public Health Veterinarian since 2007. She is also the Deputy State Epidemiologist and leads the state’s Center for Acute Disease Epidemiology at the Iowa Department of Public Health. In this capacity, she oversees the department’s vaccine-preventable disease, influenza, healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance, foodborne illness, zoonotic disease, and vector-borne disease surveillance and control programs. She also serves as adjunct faculty at the University of Iowa, College of Public Health. Dr. Garvey is active in the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists and is the immediate past president of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians.

Jesse L. Goodman, MD, MPH
Jesse L. Goodman, MD, MPH

Professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases, and Director of the Center on Medical Product Access, Safety and Stewardship (COMPASS), Georgetown University, Washington, DC

Dr. Goodman is Professor of Medicine and Attending Physician in Infectious Diseases at Georgetown University, where he also directs the Center on Medical Product Access, Safety and Stewardship (COMPASS). He previously was Chief Scientist and Deputy Commissioner for Science and Public Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), where he worked with stakeholders to better prepare for and respond to public health threats, including serving in U.S. leadership for the 2019 H1N1 pandemic response. Prior to that, he directed FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research and co-chaired the U.S. Task Force to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance. Before serving in government, Dr. Goodman was Chief of Infectious Diseases at the University of Minnesota, where his laboratory isolated Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the etiologic agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis. He has served on numerous expert committees, including of the World Health Organization, CEPI, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Institutes of Health, and currently is president of the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP), a standards-setting organization promoting global quality of medicines and food. He has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

Timothy F. Jones, MD
Timothy F. Jones, MD

State Epidemiologist, Communicable and Environmental Diseases and Emergency Preparedness, Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville

Dr. Jones is State Epidemiologist and directs the Communicable and Environmental Diseases and Emergency Preparedness section of the Tennessee Department of Health. He is responsible for many programs relevant to infectious disease prevention and control, including emerging infections, hospital infections, immunization, public health preparedness, strategic national stockpile, tuberculosis, disease surveillance, appropriate antibiotic use, and HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. He also serves as clinical professor in the Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. As a family physician, Dr. Jones has focused on providing medical care to underserved/impoverished patients. He is a widely recognized expert in foodborne disease epidemiology and serves as an international consultant on the topic for the World Health Organization and as chair of the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response. In addition, he is vice-president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists and a member of the editorial board of the journal Foodborne Pathogens and Disease.

Salmaan Keshavjee, MD, PhD
Salmaan Keshavjee, MD, PhD

Director, Harvard Medical School Center for Global Health Delivery—Dubai, and Professor,
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Dr. Keshavjee is Director of the Harvard Medical School Center for Global Health Delivery–Dubai, and Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine. A globally recognized public health leader, Dr. Keshavjee’s research spans three key areas: 1) multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment and policy; 2) health-sector reform and access to healthcare and medical technology in transitional societies; and 3) social institutions and public health in the Middle East and Central Asia. Dr. Keshavjee has led the implementation of MDR-TB treatment programs in Russia and Lesotho and has served as Chair of the World Health Organization’s Green Light Committee Initiative. In addition, he is Associate Physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Photo courtesy of Steve Lipofsky

James W. Le Duc, PhD, MSPH
James W. Le Duc, PhD, MSPH

Director, Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston

Dr. Le Duc is Director of the Galveston National Laboratory and Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), where he holds the John Sealy Distinguished University Chair in Tropical and Emerging Virology. He is a globally respected authority and leader on emerging infections, with particular focus on vector-borne diseases. He has more than four decades of biodefense and public health experience. Before joining UTMB, he served in infectious disease leadership positions at CDC and the World Health Organization, and as a career officer in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command. Dr. Le Duc is a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, the World Health Organization’s Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network Steering Committee, and the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on International Security and Arms Control. He is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences.

Michael J. Loeffelholz, PhD
Michael J. Loeffelholz, PhD

Senior Director of Medical Affairs, Cepheid, Sunnyvale, California

Dr. Loeffelholz is Senior Director of Medical Affairs at Cepheid. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is a highly accomplished expert in microbiology and laboratory research, with specific interests in molecular diagnosis of infectious diseases, quality improvement in laboratory medicine and outcomes-based research, and impact of laboratory testing and practices on patient management and hospitalization costs. Previous professional positions include Director of Clinical Microbiology in the Department of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch; Director, Virology/Serology, ViroMed Laboratories (LabCorp); and Director, Public Health Laboratory, Arkansas Department of Health. Additionally, Dr. Loeffelholz has served on the Board of Directors of the Association of Public Health Laboratories, is secretary/treasurer of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, and is an editor of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Ruth Lynfield, MD
Ruth Lynfield, MD

State Epidemiologist and Medical Director, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul

Dr. Lynfield, State Epidemiologist and Medical Director at the Minnesota Department of Health, is a highly regarded, nationally recognized public health leader and expert in infectious disease medicine and epidemiology. She leads Minnesota’s component of CDC’s Emerging Infections Program Active Bacterial Core Surveillance System, influenza projects, and healthcare-associated infections projects. She is also Adjunct Professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota. Previously, she attended in Pediatric Infectious Disease at Massachusetts General Hospital, and was Assistant Director of the New England Regional Newborn Screening Program, Massachusetts State Laboratory and Department of Health. Dr. Lynfield has served on many public health and infectious disease committees, including as a current member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, member of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and co-chair of CDC’s Emerging Infections Program Steering Committee. In addition, she is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA); is a member of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society; and has served as chair of IDSA’s National and Global Public Health Committee, and Antibiotic Resistance Working Group. Dr. Lynfield is chair of the BSC, OID.

Jeanne Marrazzo, MD, MPH
Photo of Jeanne Marrazzo

Professor and Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dr. Marrazzo is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is internationally recognized for her research and education efforts in the field of sexually transmitted infections, especially as they affect women’s health and in the setting of HIV. She is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and was elected to the IDSA Board of Directors in 2018. She conducts research on the human microbiome, specifically as it relates to female reproductive tract infections and hormonal contraception. Other research interests include pathogenesis and management of bacterial vaginosis, sexually transmitted diseases in people with HIV, and management of antibiotic resistance in gonorrhea.

Lee W. Riley, MD
Lee W. Riley, MD

Professor and Chair, Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, University of California, Berkeley

Dr. Riley is Professor and Chair, Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology at the University of California, Berkeley, and directs UC Berkeley’s Global Health Equity Scholars program of the Fogarty International Center. He is an internationally known expert in infectious diseases and public health. His research interests include molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases and bacterial pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on tuberculosis, enteric diseases, and drug-resistant gram-negative bacterial infections, as well as field epidemiology and international health, with a focus on urban informal settlements. He has decades of experience as a researcher in Asia, South America, and Mexico, including current tuberculosis research projects in Brazil. Additionally, he is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Infectious Diseases Society of America, and American Academy of Microbiology, and he serves on the editorial board of the journal Pathogens and Disease. Early in his career, Dr. Riley served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer at CDC.

Susan Elaine Sharp, PhD
Susan Sharp, PHD

Scientific Director—USA, Copan Diagnostics, Inc., Murrieta, California

Susan Sharp, Scientific Director—USA for Copan Diagnostics, is a nationally and internationally recognized leader in clinical microbiology. She previously served as Regional Director of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Laboratories for Kaiser Permanente Northwest, where she oversaw the daily operations of the microbiology laboratory and routinely consulted with clinicians regarding interpretation of complex laboratory data. She also served as an Affiliate Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Sciences University, and has presented numerous lectures, seminars, and workshops locally, nationally, and internationally. Dr. Sharp is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Microbiology (ABMM), chair of the American Society for Microbiology’s (ASM’s) Committee on Laboratory Practices, vice-chair of the ABMM, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. In 2012, Dr. Sharp was the recipient of the prestigious Sonnenwirth Award for Leadership in Clinical Microbiology.

Emily S. Spivak, MD, MHS
Emily Spivak

Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City

Dr. Spivak is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, and Medical Director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs at University of Utah Health and the Salt Lake City VA. She came to Utah in 2011 after completing residency and fellowship training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her clinical research focuses on evaluating antibiotic prescribing practices and opportunities for improvement, and patient outcomes related to various antibiotic use strategies. She is a member of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), where she serves on the Public Policy and Government Affairs Committee and the Antibiotic Stewardship Committee. She is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and serves as the vice chair of the IDSA Antimicrobial Resistance Committee.

Kathryn L. Talkington, MPAff
Kathryn L. Talkington, MPAff

Project Director, Antibiotic Resistance Project, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Washington, DC

Ms. Talkington directs Pew’s work on antibiotics, which seeks to address the growing threat of antibiotic resistance by spurring the innovation of new antibiotics and ensuring the appropriate use of antibiotics in both human healthcare settings and in food animals. Before joining Pew, she managed the immunization and infectious disease programs at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, where she developed policies on hospital-acquired infections, antimicrobial resistance, and issues related to immunization. Previously, she led strategic initiatives and programs on a wide range of healthcare issues for numerous nonprofit advocacy organizations and also state and federal policymakers.

Ms. Talkington has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia and a master’s degree in public affairs from the University of Texas at Austin.

Tina Quanbee Tan, MD

Attending Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Biography available soon

Jonathan Lane Temte, MD, PhD
Jonathan Lane Temte, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison

Dr. Temte is Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He is board-certified in family medicine and has been involved for more than two decades in the interface between public health and primary care medicine. His research interests include viral disease surveillance in primary care, seasonality and epidemiology of influenza, and attitudes toward immunization. In addition to teaching, Dr. Temte practices primary care medicine for an underserved, highly diverse community at Wingra Family Medical Center. He is the Medical Director for Madison/Dane County Public Health. He also is a past chair of the American Academy of Family Physicians Commission on Science, is current chair of the Wisconsin Council on Immunization Practices, and has served as chair of CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

Page last reviewed: October 8, 2019