Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

CDC Prevention Checklist

Preventive Care: Everyone needs an ounce of prevention.

	This graphic states that if everyone in the US received recommended clinical preventive care, we could save over 100,000 lives each year

Preventive health care can help you stay healthier throughout your life. For many people, certain preventive health care is now free, with no copays or deductibles. Learn about the preventive care that you and your loved ones need and ask your healthcare provider what health care you need to stay healthy.

What is preventive care?

Preventive care includes health services like screenings, check-ups, and patient counseling that are used to prevent illnesses, disease, and other health problems, or to detect illness at an early stage when treatment is likely to work best. Getting recommended preventive services and making healthy lifestyle choices are key steps to good health and well-being.

	Infographic depicting tests, screenings, health interventions, doctor visits, and vaccinations.

Child Preventive Services

A recent CDC report indicates that millions of infants, children, and adolescents in the U.S. did not receive selected clinical preventive services. Increased use of preventive services could improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents and promote healthy lifestyles that will enable them to achieve their full potential. Read all about clinical preventive services for children .

Click below to see the comprehensive list of recommended preventive services by group.

Preventive Services

Preventive Care for Adults

Free preventive care: Many insurance plans provide these services at no cost, without charging co-pays or deductible payments.

Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
If you have ever smoked, talk with your doctor about abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Men aged 65-75 who have ever smoked tobacco
More information from CDC

Talk with a Doctor about Your Alcohol Use
If you are concerned about your drinking, ask your doctor about screening and counseling. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC

Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day
Talk to your doctor about taking an aspirin every day to help lower your risk of heart attack or stroke. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Men aged 45-79 and women aged 55-79
More information from CDC

Get Your Blood Pressure Checked
Get your blood pressure checked at least once every 1-2 years. Ask your doctor how often you need to get checked. (USPSTF)
arrowRecommended for: Adults
More information from CDC

Get Your Cholesterol Checked
Get your cholesterol checked once every 5 years. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Men aged 35 and older, and men and women at high risk aged 20 and older
More information from CDC

Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer
Talk with your doctor about options for getting tested. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults aged 50-75
More information from CDC
Colorectal Cancer Screening: Questions for the doctor

Get Tested for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis
Talk with your doctor to find out if you need to be tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis. (USPSTF Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis. )
arrow Recommended for: Adults who have had sex or are at high risk
More information from CDC

Talk with Your Doctor about Depression
Talk with your doctor about how you are feeling if you have been sad, down, or hopeless. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
If you have high blood pressure, ask your doctor if you need to be screened for type 2 diabetes. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults with high blood pressure
More information from CDC
Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Get Help with Healthy Eating
If your doctor has told you that you are at risk for heart disease or diabetes, ask about dietary counseling. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults with high cholesterol or at risk for heart disease or diabetes
More information from CDC
Losing Weight: Questions for the doctor

Talk to Your Doctor about Preventing Falls
If you are worried about falls, ask how exercise, physical therapy, and vitamin D supplements might help you prevent falls. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults over 65
More information from CDC

Get Tested for Hepatitis C
Get tested for hepatitis C at least one time if you were born between 1945 and 1965. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults born between 1945 and 1965
More information from CDC
Hepatitis C: Talking with the doctor 

Get Tested for HIV
Get tested for HIV at least once. You may need to get tested more often depending on your risk. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC
HIV Testing: Questions for the doctor

Get Screened for Lung Cancer
Ask the doctor about screening for lung cancer if you have a history of heavy smoking and you smoke now or have quit within the past 15 years. An example of heavy smoking is smoking 1 pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years – or 2 packs a day for 15 years. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults aged 55-80 who have smoked heavily
More information from CDC

Watch Your Weight
Ask your doctor if you are at a healthy weight. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC

Talk to the Doctor about Skin Cancer
If you have fair (pale) skin, talk to the doctor about how to reduce your risk for skin cancer. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults under 24 years old with fair skin
More information from CDC

Get Help to Quit Tobacco
If you use tobacco, ask your doctor about services to help you quit. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Adults who use tobacco
More information from CDC

Get a Pneumonia Vaccine
Ask your doctor for a pneumonia vaccine. (ACIP)
arrow Recommended for: Adults over 65 and others at high risk
More information from CDC

Get a Seasonal Flu Vaccine
Get a flu vaccine every year to protect yourself and others from the flu. (ACIP)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC

Get Important Vaccines
Get important adult vaccines (vaccinations). (ACIP)
arrow Recommended for: Adults
More information from CDC
CDC: What vaccines do you need?

The recommendations on this page come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the Bright Futures (BF) Guidelines, and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Preventive Services for Women.

Preventive Care for Women

Free preventive care: Many insurance plans provide these services at no cost, without charging co-pays or deductible payments.

Get Your Well-Woman Visit Every Year
See a doctor or nurse for a checkup once a year. (IOM)
arrow Recommended for: Women under 65
More information from CDC

Choose the Right Birth Control
If you are interested in birth control, talk with a doctor about your options. (IOM)
More information from CDC

Get a Bone Density Test
Get your bone density tested starting at age 65. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Women over 65, and younger women at high risk
More information from CDC
Preventing Osteoporosis: Questions for the doctor 

Talk with a Doctor If Breast or Ovarian Cancer Runs in Your Family
Talk with your doctor if you have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. (USPSTF Genetic screening, counseling, and testing; Preventive medications)
arrow Recommended for: Women
More information from CDC
Genetic Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Questions for the doctor

Get Tested for Breast Cancer
Get a mammogram every 2 years. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Women aged 50-74
More information from CDC
Mammograms: Questions for the doctor

Get Tested for Cervical Cancer
Get a Pap test every 3 years. If you are age 30 or older and get a Pap test and an HPV test, you can get screened every 5 years instead. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Women aged 21-65
More information from CDC

Get Enough Folic Acid
Learn why women who could become pregnant need folic acid. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Women who could become pregnant
More information from CDC

Take Steps to Protect Yourself from Relationship Violence
If you think your partner might be abusive, talk with your doctor about getting help. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Women of childbearing age
More information from CDC

The recommendations on this page come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the Bright Futures (BF) Guidelines, and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Preventive Services for Women.

Preventive Care for Children

Free preventive care: Many insurance plans provide these services at no cost, without charging co-pays or deductible payments.

Talk with your child's doctor about getting all of the preventive care that is recommended for your child’s age.
arrowPreventive care recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics

Additional information about some important services for children:

Get Physical Exams On Time
Children need regular checkups. Talk to your child's doctor about when checkups are needed. Doctors commonly recommend checkups every year for children 3 years and older. For children under 3 years old, more frequent checkups are needed. The doctor or nurse will check to make sure your child is healthy and developing on schedule. (BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children, from birth to adulthood
More information from CDC

Get Your Child's Vaccines on Schedule
Check with your child's doctor to find out which vaccines your child needs. (ACIP)
arrow Recommended for: Children, from birth to adulthood
More information from CDC
CDC: What vaccines do you need?

Choose the Right Birth Control
If you are interested in birth control for your daughter, talk to her doctor about her options. (IOM)
More information from CDC

Get Your Child’s Blood Pressure Checked
Have a doctor measure your child’s blood pressure during regular checkups. (BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children age 3 years and older
More information from CDC

Get Tested for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis
If your son or daughter is sexually active, ask the doctor if he or she should get tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis. Ask the doctor about prevention counseling. (USPSTF Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis)
arrowRecommended for: Young people who have had sex
More information from CDC

Get Screened for Depression
Ask your child's doctor to screen him or her for depression, even if you don't see signs of a problem. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Children at least 12 years old
More information from CDC

Follow Development with Monitoring and Screening
Watch your child’s development and talk with your child’s doctor at every check-up about how your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves. Ask your child’s doctor about developmental screening when your child is 9, 18, and either 24 or 30 months, and autism screening at 18 and either 24 or 30 months or whenever there is a concern. (BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children, from birth to adulthood
More information from CDC

Get Your Child a Seasonal Flu Vaccine
Once your child 6 months old, your son or daughter needs a flu shot every year. Your child’s doctor can tell you if he or she needs one or two doses this year. (ACIP)
arrow Recommended for: Children at least 6 months old
More information from CDC

Check on Your Child's Hearing
If your baby did not pass the newborn hearing screening or if you have concerns about your child’s hearing, ask your child’s doctor about a full hearing test to see if there is a hearing loss. (USPSTF & BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children from birth
More information from CDC

Get Tested for HIV
All teens at least 15 years old need to get tested for HIV at least once. (USPSTF & BF)
arrow Recommended for: Teens age 15 years and older, and younger children at increased risk
More information from CDC
HIV Testing: Questions for the doctor

Get Your Child Tested for Lead Exposure
There are usually no signs or symptoms of lead poisoning. A lead test is the only way to know for sure if your child has lead poisoning. Talk with your child’s doctor about a simple blood lead test. (BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children under 6 years of age living in older housing (built before 1978), and according to state or local requirements.
More information from CDC

Get Screened for Obesity
Talk to your child's doctor to make sure he or she is at a healthy weight.
(USPSTF & BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children age 2 years and older
More information from CDC

Talk to the Doctor about Skin Cancer
If your son or daughter has fair (pale) skin, talk to the doctor about how to reduce the risk of skin cancer. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Children age 10 years and older with fair skin
More information from CDC

Take Care of Your Child's Teeth
Talk to a doctor about fluoride and finding a dentist, starting at age 6 months. (USPSTF & BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children from 6 months to adulthood
More information from CDC

Get Tobacco Screening and Education
Ask your child's doctor to screen your child for tobacco use. (BF) Ask your child's doctor to provide education or brief counseling to help prevent tobacco use. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: School-aged children and adolescents
More information from CDC

Get Your Child's Vision Checked
Have your child's vision checked, starting by age 3. (USPSTF & BF)
arrow Recommended for: Children age 3 years and older
More information from CDC

The recommendations on this page come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the Bright Futures (BF) Guidelines, and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Preventive Services for Women.

Preventive Care for Pregnant Women

Free preventive care: Many insurance plans provide these services at no cost, without charging co-pays or deductible payments.

Have a Healthy Pregnancy
Start prenatal care as early as possible. Don't use tobacco or drink alcohol during pregnancy. Your doctor will screen you for anemia, bacteria in the urine, HIV, Hepatitis B, Rh disease, and other conditions. (USPSTF Anemia , Bacteriuria , Hepatitis B , RH )
arrow Recommended for: Pregnant women
More information from CDC

Breastfeed Your Baby
Doctors recommend exclusive breastfeeding for your baby for the first 6 months and continuing to breastfeed for at least 12 months, if possible. You can get help with breastfeeding from a trained provider. Many health insurance plans provide access to breastfeeding supplies. (USPSTF and IOM)
arrow Recommended for: Pregnant women and new mothers
More information from CDC

Get Tested for HIV
Protect yourself and your baby by getting tested for HIV. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Pregnant women
More information from CDC

Talk with Your Doctor about Newborn Screening
Talk to your doctor about important newborn screening tests. (BF, USPSTF)
arrowRecommended for: Pregnant women
More information from CDC

Get Tested for Syphilis
Get tested for syphilis at your first prenatal doctor's visit. Ask the doctor about prevention counseling. (USPSTF)
arrow Recommended for: Pregnant women
More information from CDC

The recommendations on this page come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the Bright Futures (BF) Guidelines, and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Preventive Services for Women.

New to Insurance?

A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You is a guide for people with new health care coverage. It can help with understanding benefits for important preventive services as well as all health services.

Top