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What to Say...

The following tips will help you talk with your child’s doctor’s office and the evaluation centers.

Mom on the phone and computer while holding her babyDoctor’s Office

When you call your child’s doctor’s office, say, "I would like to make an appointment to see the doctor because I am concerned about my child’s development."

Be ready to share your specific concerns about your child when you call. If you wrote down notes about your concerns, keep them. Your notes will be helpful during your visit with the doctor.

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (1.800.695.0285)

When you call the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, say, "My child is (child’s age) and I live in (state). I am concerned about my child’s development and would like to request a developmental evaluation. Can you tell me who to call and give me the phone number?"

  • Write down all the information you are given and keep it; you might need it another time.

Early Intervention Services Office

When you call your state’s early intervention services office (if your child is not yet 3 years old), say, "I am concerned about my child’s development and would like to request an evaluation. Can you help me or let me speak with someone who can?"

  • Be ready to share your specific concerns about your child. You will also be asked for some general information about yourself and your child (your name, your child’s name and age, where you live, and more).
  • Write down who you speak to, the date, and what was said; you might need this information later.

Elementary School or Board of Education

When you call your local elementary school or board of education (if your child is 3 or older), say, "I am concerned about my child’s development and would like to talk with someone about having my child evaluated. Can you help me or let me speak with someone who can?"

  • Be ready to share your specific concerns about your child. You will also be asked for some general information about yourself and your child (your name, your child’s name and age, where you live, and more).
  • Write down who you speak to, the date, and what was said; you might need this information later.

While You Wait

If you have to wait to get an appointment to see a specialist or start intervention services, know that there are some simple things you can do today and everyday to help your child’s development.

Tips for while you wait »

 

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