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Resources

Web, print, and other resources for partners and the public

Federal NARMS Partners

  • FDA NARMS
    FDA coordinates NARMS and leads the retail meat testing portion of the NARMS program
  • USDA NARMS
    USDA leads the food animal sampling portion of the NARMS program

Annual NARMS Reports

NARMS Now: Human Data

Graphic: Narms Now

A new interactive tool from CDC makes it easier and quicker to find out how antibiotic resistance for four bacteria transmitted commonly through food – Campylobacter, E. coli O157, Salmonella, and Shigella – has changed over the past 20 years.

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Antibiotic Resistance from the Farm to the Table

Graphic: Antibiotic Resistance: From the Farm to the Table. Resistance: All animals carry bacteria in their intestines. Antibiotics are given to animals. Antibiotics kill most bacteria. But resistant bacteria survive and multiply. Spread: Resistant bacteria can spread to animal products, produce through contaminated water or soil, prepared food through contaminated surfaces, and the environment when animals poop. Exposure: People can get sick with resistant infections from contaminated food and contaminated environment. Impact: Some infections cause mild illness, severe illness, and may lead to death.

Learn how bacteria become resistant to antibiotics and how antibiotic-resistant bacteria can be transmitted by food and cause human illness .

  • Each year, antibiotic-resistant infections from foodborne germs cause an estimated 440,000 illnesses in the United States.
  • Ensuring that our food is safe includes tracking the spread of antibiotic resistant infections between people, the food they eat, and sources of our food supply.
  • Learn more about antibiotic resistance and food safety.

CDC and Antimicrobial Resistance

Antimicrobial Resistance Education

NARMS Antibiotic Report Cover

International and Consensus Organizations

Country-Specific Programs

CDC Foodborne Illnesses and Food Safety Websites

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