Who Should NOT Get Vaccinated with these Vaccines?

Because of age, health conditions, or other factors, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below for each vaccine.

Regularly Recommended Vaccines

Some children should not get DTaP vaccine or should wait.

DTaP is only for children younger than 7 years old. DTaP vaccine is not appropriate for everyone – a small number of children should receive a different vaccine that contains only diphtheria and tetanus instead of DTaP.

Tell your health care provider if your child:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of DTaP, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Has had a coma or long repeated seizures within 7 days after a dose of DTaP.
  • Has seizures or another nervous system problem.
  • Has had a condition called Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS).
  • Has had severe pain or swelling after a previous dose of DTaP or DT vaccine.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone your child’s DTaP vaccination to a future visit.

Children with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Children who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting DTaP vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the DTaP VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

Tell the person who is giving you the vaccine:

  • If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies.
    If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of hepatitis A vaccine, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you may be advised not to get vaccinated. Ask your health care provider if you want information about vaccine components.
  • If you are not feeling well.
    If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis A VIS.

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of hepatitis B vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone hepatitis B vaccination to a future visit.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting hepatitis B vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis B VIS.

Some people should not get this vaccine.

Hib vaccine should not be given to infants younger than 6 weeks of age.

A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of Hib vaccine, OR has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, should not get Hib vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccine about any severe allergies.

People who are mildly ill can get Hib vaccine. People who are moderately or severely ill should probably wait until they recover. Talk to your healthcare provider if the person getting the vaccine isn’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

This information was taken directly from the Hib VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

  • Anyone who has had a severe (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a dose of HPV vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe (life threatening) allergy to any component of HPV vaccine should not get the vaccine.
    Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies that you know of, including a severe allergy to yeast.
  • HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. If you learn that you were pregnant when you were vaccinated, there is no reason to expect any problems for you or your baby. Any woman who learns she was pregnant when she got HPV vaccine is encouraged to contact the manufacturer’s registry for HPV vaccination during pregnancy at 1-800-986-8999. Women who are breastfeeding may be vaccinated.
  • If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

This information was taken directly from the HPV VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of influenza vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Has ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (also called GBS).

 In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone influenza vaccination to a future visit.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting influenza vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Inactivated Influenza VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Is younger than 2 years or older than 49 years of age.
  • Is pregnant.
  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of influenza vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is a child or adolescent 2 through 17 years of age who is receiving aspirin or aspirin-containing products.
  • Has a weakened immune system.
  • Is a child 2 through 4 years old who has asthma or a history of wheezing in the past 12 months.
  • Has taken influenza antiviral medication in the previous 48 hours.
  • Cares for severely immunocompromised persons who require a protected environment.
  • Is 5 years or older and has asthma.
  • Has other underlying medical conditions that can put people at higher risk of serious flu complications (such as lung disease, heart disease, kidney disease, kidney or liver disorders, neurologic or neuromuscular or metabolic disorders).
  • Has had Guillain-Barré Syndrome within 6 weeks after a previous dose of influenza vaccine.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone influenza vaccination to a future visit.

For some patients, a different type of influenza vaccine (inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine) might be more appropriate than live, attenuated influenza vaccine.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting influenza vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Live Influenza VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of MMR or MMRV vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is pregnant, or thinks she might be pregnant.
  • Has a weakened immune system, or has a parent, brother, or sister with a history of hereditary or congenital immune system problems.
  • Has ever had a condition that makes him or her bruise or bleed easily.
  • Has recently had a blood transfusion or received other blood products.
  • Has tuberculosis.
  • Has gotten any other vaccines in the past 4 weeks.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone MMR vaccination to a future visit.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting MMR vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the MMR VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of MMRV, MMR, or varicella vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is pregnant, or thinks she might be pregnant.
  • Has a weakened immune system, or has a parent, brother, or sister with a history of hereditary or congenital immune system problems.
  • Has ever had a condition that makes him or her bruise or bleed easily.
  • Has a history of seizures, or has a parent, brother, or sister with a history of seizures.
  • Is taking, or plans to take salicylates (such as aspirin).
  • Has recently had a blood transfusion or received other blood products.
  • Has tuberculosis.
  • Has gotten any other vaccines in the past 4 weeks.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone MMRV vaccination to a future visit, or may recommend that the child receive separate MMR and varicella vaccines instead of MMRV.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Children who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting MMRV vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the MMRV VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of meningococcal ACWY vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone meningococcal ACWY vaccination to a future visit.

Not much is known about the risks of this vaccine for a pregnant woman or breastfeeding mother. However, pregnancy or breastfeeding are not reasons to avoid meningococcal ACWY vaccination. A pregnant or breastfeeding woman should be vaccinated if otherwise indicated.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting meningococcal ACWY vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of meningococcal B vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is pregnant or breastfeeding.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone meningococcal B vaccination to a future visit.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting meningococcal B vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Meningococcal B VIS.

Some people should not get this vaccine.

Anyone who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a dose of this vaccine, to an earlier pneumococcal vaccine called PCV7, or to any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid (for example, DTaP), should not get PCV13.

Anyone with a severe allergy to any component of PCV13 should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person being vaccinated has any severe allergies.

If the person scheduled for vaccination is not feeling well, your healthcare provider might decide to reschedule the shot on another day.

This information was taken directly from the PCV13 VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of PPSV should not receive it. Tell your provider if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill when the shot is scheduled may be asked to wait until they recover before getting the vaccine. Someone with a mild illness can usually be vaccinated.
  • Children less than 2 years of age should not receive this vaccine.
  • There is no evidence that PPSV is harmful to either a pregnant woman or to her fetus. However, as a precaution, women who need the vaccine should be vaccinated before becoming pregnant, if possible.

This information was taken directly from the PPSV VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

Tell the person who is giving the vaccine:

  • If the person getting the vaccine has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
    If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of IPV, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you may be advised not to get vaccinated. Ask your health care provider if you want information about vaccine components.
  • If the person getting the vaccine is not feeling well.
    If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

This information was taken directly from the IPV VIS.

Some babies should not get this vaccine.

A baby who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a dose of rotavirus vaccine should not get another dose. A baby who has a severe allergy to any part of rotavirus vaccine should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if your baby has any severe allergies that you know of, including a severe allergy to latex.

Babies with “severe combined immunodeficiency” (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine.

Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called “intussusception” should not get rotavirus vaccine.

Babies who are mildly ill can get the vaccine. Babies who are moderately or severely ill should wait until they recover. This includes babies with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting.

Check with your doctor if your baby’s immune system is weakened because of:

  • HIV/AIDS, or any other disease that affects the immune system
  • treatment with drugs such as steroids
  • cancer, or cancer treatment with x-rays or drugs

This information was taken directly from the Rotavirus VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

  • A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of any tetanus or diphtheria containing vaccine, OR has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, should not get Td vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccine about any severe allergies.
  • Talk to your doctor if you:
    • had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria or tetanus,
    • ever had a condition called Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS),
    • aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

This information was taken directly from the Td VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine.

  • A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of any diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis containing vaccine, OR has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, should not get Tdap vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccine about any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who had coma or long repeated seizures within 7 days after a childhood dose of DTP or DTaP, or a previous dose of Tdap, should not get Tdap, unless a cause other than the vaccine was found. They can still get Td.
  • Talk to your doctor if you:
    • have seizures or another nervous system problem,
    • had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis,
    • ever had a condition called Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS),
    • aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

This information was taken directly from the Tdap VIS

Talk with your health care provider.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of varicella vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is pregnant, or thinks she might be pregnant.
  • Has a weakened immune system, or has a parent, brother, or sister with a history of hereditary or congenital immune system problems.
  • Is taking salicylates (such as aspirin).
  • Has recently had a blood transfusion or received other blood products.
  • Has tuberculosis
  • Has gotten any other vaccines in the past 4 weeks.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone varicella vaccination to a future visit.

People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting varicella vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Varicella VIS

Some people should not get shingles vaccine or should wait.

Tell your vaccine provider if you:

  • Have any severe, life-threatening allergies. A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of live shingles vaccine, or has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine, may be advised not to be vaccinated. Ask your health care provider if you want information about vaccine components.
  • Are pregnant, or think you might be pregnant. Pregnant women should wait to get live shingles vaccine until they are no longer pregnant. Women should avoid getting pregnant for at least 1 month after getting shingles vaccine.
  • Have a weakened immune system due to disease (such as cancer or AIDS) or medical treatments (such as radiation, immunotherapy, high-dose steroids, or chemotherapy).
  • Are not feeling well. If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

This information was taken directly from the Live Shingles VIS

Some people should not get shingles vaccine or should wait.

Tell your vaccine provider if you:

  • Have any severe, life-threatening allergies. A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of recombinant shingles vaccine, or has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine, may be advised not to be vaccinated. Ask your health care provider if you want information about vaccine components.
  • Are pregnant or breastfeeding. There is not much information about use of recombinant shingles vaccine in pregnant or nursing women. Your healthcare provider might recommend delaying vaccination.
  • Are not feeling well. If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

This information was taken directly from the Recombinant Shingles VIS

Travel & Special Circumstance Vaccines

Some people should not get adenovirus vaccine:

  • Anyone with a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any component of the vaccine. Tell the doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Pregnant women or nursing mothers.
  • Anyone who is unable to swallow the vaccine tablets whole without chewing them.
  • Anyone younger than 17 or older than 50 years of age.

Other precautions:

  • Talk with a doctor if:
    • you have HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system, or
    • your immune system is weakened because of cancer or other medical conditions, a transplant, or radiation or drug treatment (such as steroids or cancer chemotherapy).
  • Women should not become pregnant for 6 weeks following vaccination.
  • Vaccination should be postponed for anyone with vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Virus from the vaccine can be shed in the stool for up to 28 days after vaccination. To minimize the risk of spreading vaccine virus to other people during this period, observe proper personal hygiene, such as frequent hand washing, especially following bowel movements. This is especially important if you have close contact with children 7 years of age and younger, with anyone having a weakened immune system, or with pregnant women.

Note: Adenovirus vaccine is approved for use only among military personnel.

This information was taken directly from the Adenovirus VIS

Some people should not get anthrax vaccine.

Tell your vaccine provider if you:

  • Have any severe, life-threatening allergies. A person who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of anthrax vaccine, or has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, may be advised not to be vaccinated. Ask your health care provider to explain the components of the vaccine. 
  • Are pregnant, or think you might be pregnant. Vaccination is not routinely recommended for pregnant women, but may be recommended for pregnant women who have been exposed to anthrax. 
  • Are not feeling well. If you are receiving the vaccine because you are at risk of exposure to anthrax bacteria and have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise.

    If you are receiving the vaccine because you have been exposed to anthrax and are not feeling well, you should seek medical care immediately.

This information was taken directly from the Anthrax VIS

Some people should not get this vaccine or should wait

Tell the person who is giving you the vaccine:

  • If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies.
    If you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of any cholera vaccine, or if you have a severe allergy to any ingredient in this vaccine, you should not get the vaccine. Tell your health care provider if you have any severe allergies that you know of. He or she can tell you about the vaccine’s ingredients.
  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
    Not much is known about the potential risks of this vaccine for a pregnant or breastfeeding woman. A registry has been set up to learn more about vaccination during pregnancy. If you get the vaccine and later learn you were pregnant at the time, you are encouraged to contact this registry at 1-800-533-5899.
  • If you’ve recently taken antibiotics.
    Antibiotics taken within 14 days before vaccination may cause the vaccine to not work as well.
  • If you are taking anti-malaria drugs.
    Cholera vaccine should not be taken with the anti-malaria drug chloroquine. It is best to wait at least 10 days after the vaccine to take anti-malaria drugs.

Always wash your hands thoroughly after using the bathroom and before preparing or handling food. Cholera vaccine can be shed in feces for at least 7 days.

If you have a mild illness, like a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, your doctor might recommend waiting until you recover.

This information was taken directly from the Cholera VIS

 Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of JE vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Is pregnant. Pregnant women should usually not get JE vaccine.
  • Will be traveling for fewer than 30 days and only traveling to urban areas. You might not need the vaccine.

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone JE vaccination to a future visit.

 People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting JE vaccine.

Your health care provider can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Japanese Encephalitis VIS

Talk with a doctor before getting rabies vaccine if you:

  1. ever had a serious (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a previous dose of rabies vaccine, or to any component of the vaccine; tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies,
  2. have a weakened immune system because of:
    • HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids,
    • cancer, or cancer treatment with radiation or drugs.

If you have a minor illnesses, such as a cold, you can be vaccinated. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover before getting a routine (non-exposure) dose of rabies vaccine.

If you have been exposed to rabies virus, you should get the vaccine regardless of any other illnesses you may have.

This information was taken directly from the Rabies VIS

This medication guide replaces the Smallpox VIS. It is to be used before one receives the vaccination. Medical Guide for vaccination with ACAM2000 pdf icon[6 pages]external icon (10/1/09)

Some people should not get typhoid vaccine or should wait.

Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)

  • Should not be given to children younger than 2 years of age.
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine should not get it. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting the vaccine.

Live typhoid vaccine (oral)

  • Should not be given to children younger than 6 years of age.
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine should not get it. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the vaccine is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting it. Tell your doctor if you have an illness involving vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Anyone whose immune system is weakened should not get this vaccine. They should get the typhoid shot instead. This includes anyone who:
    • has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids for 2 weeks or longer,
    • has any kind of cancer,
    • is taking cancer treatment with radiation or drugs.
  • Oral typhoid vaccine should not be given until at least 3 days after taking antibiotics.

Ask your doctor for more information.

This information was taken directly from the Typhoid VIS

Who should not get the yellow fever vaccine?

  • Anyone with a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of yellow fever vaccine should not get yellow fever vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Infants younger than 6 months of age should not get the vaccine.
  • Tell your doctor if:
    • You have HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system.
    • Your immune system is weakened as a result of cancer or other medical conditions, a transplant, or radiation or drug treatment (such as steroids, cancer chemotherapy, or other drugs that affect immune cell function).
    • Your thymus has been removed or you have a thymus disorder, such as myasthenia gravis, DiGeorge syndrome, or thymoma.

    Your doctor will help you decide whether you can receive the vaccine.

  • Adults 60 years of age and older who cannot avoid travel to a yellow fever area should discuss vaccination with their doctor. They might be at increased risk for severe problems following vaccination.
  • Infants 6 through 8 months of age, pregnant women, and nursing mothers should avoid or postpone travel to an area where there is risk of yellow fever. If travel cannot be avoided, discuss vaccination with your doctor.

If you cannot get the vaccine for medical reasons, but require proof of yellow fever vaccination for travel, your doctor can give you a waiver letter if he considers the risk acceptably low. If you plan to use a waiver, you should also contact the embassy of the countries you plan to visit for more information.

This information was taken directly from the Yellow Fever VIS

Page last reviewed: August 15, 2019