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Measles: It Isn’t Just a Little Rash Infographic

Infographic. Measles: it isn’t just a little rash. Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children. Measles symptoms typically include high fever (may spike to more than 104 degrees F), cough, runny nose, red watery eyes; rash breaks out 3-6 days after symptoms begin. Measles can be serious. About 1 out of 4 people who get measles will be hospitalized. 1 out of every 1,000 people with measles will develop brain swelling (encephalitis), which may lead to brain damage. 1 or 2 out of 1,000 people with measles will die, even with the best care. You have the power to protect your child. Provide your children with safe and long-lasting protection agains measles by making sure they get the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine according to CDC’s recommended immunization schedule.

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Measles

It isn’t just a little rash

Measles can be dangerous, especially for babies and young children.

[Illustration of 6 boys and girls of various races]

 

Measles symptoms typically include:

  • High fever (may spike to more than 104° F)
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Red, watery eyes
  • Rash breaks out 3-5 days after symptoms begin

[Illustration of a little boy with watery eyes, runny nose and a thermometer in his mouth]

 

Measles Can Be Serious

About 1 out of 4 people who get measles will be hospitalized.

1 out of every 1,000 people with measles will develop brain swelling due to infection (encephalitis), which may lead to brain damage.

1 or 2 out of 1,000 people with measles will die, even with the best care.

[Illustration of a hospital]

[Illustration of the brain]

[Illustration of many people that symbolize the community, all colored in blue, except 2 that are gray]

 

You have the power to protect your child.

Provide your children with safe and long-lasting protection against measles by making sure they get the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine according to CDC’s recommended immunization schedule.

[Illustration of a mom and her son smiling]

www.cdc.gov/measles

[logo] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[logo] American Academy of Pediatrics

[logo] American Academy of Family Physicians

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