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The African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology (ANISE)

African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology (ANISE)The African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology (ANISE) was founded in 2009 to help scientists share and standardize influenza surveillance methods in Africa. ANISE encourages African countries to generate and disseminate data on the burden and epidemiology of influenza.

Members can use the Network to coordinate with one another and provide laboratory and epidemiologic support to other members.

The objectives of the ANISE Network are to:

  • Generate and disseminate data on the burden and epidemiology of influenza in Africa
  • Share and promote use of standardized surveillance methods in the region
  • Coordinate and provide laboratory and epidemiologic support for the continued surveillance of seasonal influenza and for the detection of pandemic strains

The Network is open to professionals working on influenza-related projects or research in Africa.

Send an email to ANISE@cdc.gov to receive emails from the ANISE listserv.

Announcing...

The 4th African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology (ANISE) Meeting will be held in Cape Town, South Africa on December 5-6, 2014 following ASLM2014. The ANISE Meeting will bring together approximately 130 participants from over 20 African countries, international public health organizations, and academic institutions working on influenza in Africa.

Visit the conference site

Past Conferences

The first ANISE Meeting took place in South Africa in December 2009. The meeting was co-hosted by CDC and South Africa’s National Institute for Communicable Disease. It was originally scheduled for May 2009, but postponed due to the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. The meeting showcased efforts to start and/or improve influenza surveillance in Africa. The first ANISE meeting brought together approximately 110 attendees from 20 countries.

In January 2011, ANISE had its second meeting in Ghana. The meeting was co-hosted by CDC, the Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, and Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3. It brought together approximately 100 members from 23 African countries, along with representatives from Ghana Health Services, World Health Organization (WHO), Agence de Médecine Préventive, and Institut Pasteur. Attendees discussed influenza surveillance and research projects conducted over the past two years. Highlights of the meeting included brief presentations given by each country showcasing their surveillance achievements and epidemiologic and laboratory data.

In February 2012, CDC’s Influenza Division and the Kenya Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation hosted the 3rd ANISE meeting in Kenya. The meeting brought together 170 participants representing 30 countries, including 24 African countries. Additionally, members from organizations such as the WHO, Institut Pasteur, and the U.S. Army Medical Research Unit in Kenya attended and provided updates.

Related Web Articles

Influenza in Africa

An influenza surveillance nurse collects a sample from a child with acute respiratory illness at a local hospital in Rwanda.

An influenza surveillance nurse collects a sample from a child with acute respiratory illness at a local hospital in Rwanda.

Influenza infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. At particular risk of severe disease are young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and persons with underlying medical conditions. The burden and epidemiology of influenza have been studied almost exclusively in developed settings, but influenza may have a different epidemiology in lesser resourced settings such as Africa due to untreated co-morbidities, malnutrition and other factors. Vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza illness but, due to cost, most vulnerable populations in low-income countries do not have access to influenza vaccines.

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