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Q and AQUESTIONS ANSWERED

 

I'm in my house with my parents all the time and nothing bad happens. Why is it such a big deal to stay home alone? I can totally handle it!

Why should I talk to my family about what to do in case of a house fire? If something happens, we will all just figure out what to do. It will be fine!

All animals can be family household pets, right?

Having a pet is easy. Don't they just need food and water?

Sometimes it's best if my parents don't find out exactly what I've been up to in my room (my mom doesn't need to see the paint on the carpet)—so I clean up the evidence with every cleanser and scrub in the cabinet. That's OK, right?

Everybody has a microwave and no one said anything about rules. They are totally safe and I can use it for just about anything, right?

Parents
QuestionI'm in my house with my parents all the time and nothing bad happens. Why is it such a big deal to stay home alone? I can totally handle it!

AnswerYou think it is no big deal to stay home alone. But, it's actually a lot of responsibility. Before going solo, make sure you and your parents discuss an emergency plan. That way, you'll know exactly what to do if something happens. Be sure you know how to get in touch with them and have an adult you can call in case you can't reach your mom and dad.


QuestionWhy should I talk to my family about what to do in case of a house fire? If something happens, we will all just figure out what to do. It will be fine!

AnswerEveryone thinks they will know what to do in an emergency situation. But, when you are actually in one, it is easy to panic or freeze. So, instead of freaking out, you and your family can come up with a plan in advance. That way, everyone knows exactly what to do, where to go, and who to call when something does happen. Practice at least two ways to get out of your house, and have a fire drill with your parents-that way, if anything ever happens, you will be prepared. The more times you practice, the easier it will be to remember what do if you are faced with an emergency.

Walking the dog
QuestionAll animals can be family household pets, right?

 

AnswerDefinitely not! Some animals carry really dangerous diseases that are seriously harmful. These animals are better left in their natural environment and not cooped up inside.

Raccoons, coyotes, certain types of birds, foxes, deer, skunks, and squirrels might look really cute, but they are not family pets. Wild animals are called "wild" because that's what they are! They live in woods, parks, and oceans and don't know how to play with us like house pets do. Even if they seem cute, they can bite and put you at risk for serious diseases like rabies, Lime disease, or tularemia. Get your fix by watching your favorite wild animal from a distance or learning more about them online, at the zoo, in a book or magazine, or on a nature TV show. Speaking of TV, keep in mind that people involved with those shows are trained experts. They make the hard stuff look easy and know what to do if an animal freaks out. Don't try their tricks at home!


QuestionHaving a pet is easy. Don't they just need food and water?

 

AnswerPets must be cared for, and it takes time, money, and love! Some need to be walked, washed (to prevent ticks), fed, and cuddled (like dogs). Others just need to be left alone (like snakes). And almost all pets have to go to the animal doctor (a veterinarian). They may even have to get shots and medicine. That can cost a pretty penny. When you decide to get a pet of your very own, be sure you know all that is involved so you can be the best owner possible, providing a healthy and safe environment for your new critter.


QuestionSometimes it's best if my parents don't find out exactly what I've been up to in my room (my mom doesn't need to see the paint on the carpet)—so I clean up the evidence with every cleanser and scrub in the cabinet. That's OK, right?

AnswerMany of the products used to clean are made with ingredients that can be dangerous. You need to be really careful about how you use them. Some cleaners are safe on their own but can be very dangerous when mixed with other cleaners. Read the label on each cleaning product and talk with your folks about what products you can and can't use. Make sure you know what to do if you accidentally mix them, or if you swallow bleach or touch any chemicals you should have avoided.


QuestionEverybody has a microwave and no one said anything about rules. Microwaves are totally safe and I can use them for just about anything, right?

AnswerYes, microwaves are a huge time-saver and very easy to use. But anything that can melt your cheese that fast has some serious fire power. So, like any other appliance, you need to know a few things before you start microwave cooking. First, figure out which bowls, plates, and glasses are safe to use in the microwave. Remember that metal should never, ever be used in the microwave. That means no silverware, foil, or metal bowls or plates. If you use the wrong container, you can start a microwave fire.

Check the cooking time and directions of your favorite foods. You can find them on the box or ask your parents. Remember that munchies you heat up in the microwave can get super hot and burn you big time! Food can also heat up unevenly in a microwave. The outside of your favorite breakfast pastry might be cool but the inside might be piping hot. So, stir the food if you can and check before you bite. Chill out with your food before you chow down.

 

 

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