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Test Your Smarts!Test Your Smarts - Tricks of the Trade


Question Icon The smoke from cigarettes has how many different things in it that cause cancer:

 


Question Icon In 1989, millions of cases of fruit were tossed out after a teeny bit of cyanide was found in just two grapes. How much cyanide is there in a cigarette, compared to those grapes? 

 


Question Icon Tobacco companies add ammonia to cigarettes because it makes the nicotine (the addictive stuff) in cigarettes stronger, which makes people get hooked faster. Where else can you find ammonia?   

 

Sorry, that is incorrect.

Cartoon drawing of bug spray and detergentLooks like cigarettes are much more dangerous than you thought! There are no fewer than 69 cancer-causing agents in cigarette smoke! Cigarettes companies add all kinds of dangerous chemicals to cigarettes to give smokers a stronger hit of nicotine (and keep them hooked on smoking).

Sorry, that is incorrect.

Cartoon drawing of bug spray and detergentLooks like cigarettes are much more dangerous than you thought! There are no fewer than 69 cancer-causing agents in cigarette smoke! Cigarettes companies add all kinds of dangerous chemicals to cigarettes to give smokers a stronger hit of nicotine (and keep them hooked on smoking).

Correct!

Cartoon drawing of bug spray and detergentRight on! You know that there are no fewer than 69 cancer-causing agents in cigarette smoke! Cigarettes companies add all kinds of dangerous chemicals to cigarettes to give smokers a stronger hit of nicotine (and keep them hooked on smoking).

Sorry, that is incorrect.

No way! Cigarettes have way more cyanide than the fruit had. Cyanide is a dangerous poison—so dangerous that they threw out tons of fruit after two measly grapes had traces of the chemical. Your average cigarette, on the other hand, has thirty-three times the cyanide that was found in those two grapes.

Sorry, that is incorrect.

No way! Cigarettes have way more cyanide than the fruit had. Cyanide is a dangerous poison—so dangerous that they threw out tons of fruit after two measly grapes had traces of the chemical. Your average cigarette, on the other hand, has thirty-three times the cyanide that was found in those two grapes.

Correct!

TThat's right! Cigarettes have way more cyanide than the fruit had. Cyanide is a dangerous poison—so dangerous that they threw out tons of fruit after two measly grapes had traces of the chemical. Your average cigarette, on the other hand, has thirty-three times the cyanide that was found in those two grapes.

Correct!

Cartoon drawing of a young boyThey're all right! Ammonia is in fertilizers, explosives, and refrigerants. It's also what makes cat pee stink. Smokers are breathing ammonia in, along with all sorts of other nasty chemicals, like carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas also found in car exhaust, and arsenic, a poisonous metal used in bug and weed sprays.

Correct!

Cartoon drawing of a young boyThey're all right! Ammonia is in fertilizers, explosives, and refrigerants. It's also what makes cat pee stink. Smokers are breathing ammonia in, along with all sorts of other nasty chemicals, like carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas also found in car exhaust, and arsenic, a poisonous metal used in bug and weed sprays.

Correct!

Cartoon drawing of a young boyThey're all right! Ammonia is in fertilizers, explosives, and refrigerants. It's also what makes cat pee stink. Smokers are breathing ammonia in, along with all sorts of other nasty chemicals, like carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas also found in car exhaust, and arsenic, a poisonous metal used in bug and weed sprays.

Correct!

Cartoon drawing of a young boyThey're all right! Ammonia is in fertilizers, explosives, and refrigerants. It's also what makes cat pee stink. Smokers are breathing ammonia in, along with all sorts of other nasty chemicals, like carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas also found in car exhaust, and arsenic, a poisonous metal used in bug and weed sprays.

 

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