Selected Charts on Young Worker Employment, Injuries and Illnesses

Selected Charts on Young Worker Employment, Injuries and Illnesses

These charts include currently available data as well as trend data for multiple years.

Chart Thumbnail Image Description
Numbers of Employed Youth FTEs by year
Numbers of Employed Youth FTEs (Ages 16-24) by year, United States, 2000-2019
This graph shows the numbers of full-time equivalents (FTEs) for employed youth ages 16-24 years in the United States for the time period 2000-2019. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey. NIOSH analyses using public microdata files.)
Distribution of Employed Youth (16-17) FTEs by industry sector
Distribution of Employed Youth FTEs (Ages 16-17) by Industry Sector, United States, 2019
This chart shows the distribution of full time equivalents (FTEs) for employed youth ages 16-17 years by industry sector in 2019. The industry sector with the largest numbers of employed youth was the services sector, accounting for 64% of all youth employment, mostly in restaurants and other food services. This was followed by trade sector with 20% of youth employment, then the healthcare and social services sector with 6% of youth employment. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey. NIOSH analyses using public microdata files.)
Distribution of Employed Youth FTEs by occupation
Distribution of Employed Youth FTEs (Ages 16-17) by Occupation, United States, 2019
This chart shows the distribution of full-time equivalents (FTEs) for employed youth ages 16-17 years by occupation in 2019.  Service jobs were the primary occupation for 47% of all youth employment.  This was followed by sales and office occupations with 32% of youth employment. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey. NIOSH analyses using public microdata files.)
Number of Employed Youth by year
Numbers of Employed Youth (Ages 15-17) by Year, United States
This graph shows the numbers of employed youth ages 15- 17 years in the United States for the time period 1994 to 2019. The numbers of employed youth began a steady decline in 2007, however, the number of employed youth has increased in recent years. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey. NIOSH analyses using public microdata files.)
Distribution of Employed youth (15-17) by industry sector
Distribution of Employed Youth (Ages 15-17) by Industry Sector, United States, 2019
This chart shows the distribution of employed youth ages 15-17 years by industry sector in 2019. The industry sector with the largest numbers of employed youth was the leisure and hospitality sector, accounting for 51% of all youth employment, with 83% of youth employed in restaurants and drinking establishments. This was followed by the retail trade sector with 18% of youth employment, then the educational and health services sector with 8% of youth employment. (Source: NIOSH analyses of Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey using the Employed Labor Force query system)
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Percentage of teenagers (16-19) who are enrolled in school and working in the United States from 1985 to 2019external icon
This chart shows the percentage of youth who were working while being enrolled in school between 1985 and 2019.  In 2019, around 19.2 percent of teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19 were employees while enrolled at school in the United States. This is a slight decrease from the previous year, when 19.4 percent of teenagers were working while at school.
Data Overview of Young Worker Deaths and injuries, united States
Data Overview of Young Worker Deaths and Injuries, United States
Facts of young worker deaths and nonfatal injuries from different data sources.
Distribution of Youth (<18 Years) Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Involving Days Away from Work Reported by Private Sector Employers by Industry Sector, United States
Distribution of Youth (<18 Years) Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Involving Days Away from Work Reported by Private Sector Employers by Industry Sector, United States, 2019
This chart shows employer-reported work-related injuries and illnesses among youth that required at least a day away from work by industry sector in 2019. The industry sector with the largest numbers of injured youth was the leisure and hospitality sector, accounting for 62% of reported injuries and illnesses among youth, with most of these injuries and illnesses in accommodations and food services. The retail trade sector had the second highest frequency with 18% of reported injuries and illnesses among youth. (Source: NIOSH analyses of Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey using the Employed Labor Force query system.)
StatesThis graph shows work-related injury fatality rates for 15 to 17 year oldsin the United States for the time period 1994 to 2017. There is not a clear trend in these numbers, with rises and falls in youth fatality rates over the time period. The highest fatality rate, 3.8 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, was in the years 1995 and 1999. The lowest fatality rate, 1.3 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, was in 2017.
Fatality Rates/100,000 Fulltime Equivalents (FTE) for 15-17 Year-Olds by Year, United States
This graph shows work-related injury fatality rates for 15 to 17 year olds in the United States for the time period 1994 to 2019. There is not a clear trend in these numbers, with rises and falls in youth fatality rates over the time period. The highest fatality rate, 3.8 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, was in the years 1995 and 1999. The lowest fatality rate, 1.3 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, was in 2017. (Source: Fatal injury totals and rates were generated by NIOSH researchers with restricted access to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)external icon and BLS Current Population Survey dataexternal icon. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of BLS.)
Rates of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments by Year, 15-17 Year-Olds, United States
Rates of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments by Year, 15-17 Year-Olds, United States
This graph shows rates for work-related nonfatal injuries and illnesses treated in emergency departments for 15 to 17 year olds in the United States for the time period 2005 to 2018. Rates were generally declining from 2005 to 2009, then variable for the next few years. The highest rate, 4.4 injuries and illnesses per 100 fulltime equivalents, was in 2005. The lowest rate, 2.56 injuries and illnesses per 100 fulltime equivalents, was in 2016. (Source: National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS)-NIOSH Work Supplement –Work-Related Injury Statistics Query System
Rates of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Treated in Emergency Departments by Age Group, United States
Rates of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses Treated in Emergency Departments by Age Group, United States, 2018
This graph shows rates for work-related nonfatal injuries and illnesses treated in emergency departments by age group in the United States for 2017. The highest rate is seen for workers 18 to 24 years of age, with a rate of 2.9 injuries per 100 fulltime equivalents. The next highest rate is seen for workers 15 to 17 years of age, with a rate of 2.6 injuries per 100 fulltime equivalents. Rates decline for older age groups from a rate of 2.1 injuries per 100 fulltime equivalents for workers 25 to 34 years of age to a rate of 1.1 for workers 65 years and older. (Source: National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS)-NIOSH Work Supplement –Work-Related Injury Statistics Query System
Rates of Work-related Injuries Reported by Farm Operators, 15-17 Year-Olds, United States
Rates of Work-related Injuries Reported by Farm Operators, 15-17 Year-Olds, United States
This graph shows rates of work-related injuries among 15 to 17 year olds reported by farm operators in the United States for 7 points in time between 1998 and 2014. Rates steadily declined from a high of 9.6 injuries per 1,000 youth working on farms in 1998 to 3.7 injuries per 1,000 youth working on farms in 2012, before showing an increase in 2014 to 5.6 injuries per 1,000 youth working on farms. (Source: NIOSH Childhood Agricultural Injury Survey.)
2017This graph shows work-related injury fatality rates by age groups ranging from 15 year-olds to workers 55 to 64 years of age in the United States for the time period 1994 to 2017. The highest fatality rates are seen at the ends of this spectrum, with the highest rates for workers 55 to 64 years of age, 5.2 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, followed by the rate for 15 year olds, 4.6 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents. Rates generally increase from younger to older age groups for the mediate age groups with rates increasing from a low of 2.6 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents for 16 to 17 year-olds to a rate of 4.0 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents for workers 45-54 years of age.
Fatality Rates/100,000 Fulltime Equivalents (FTE) by Age Group, United States, 1994-2019
This graph shows work-related injury fatality rates by age groups ranging from 15 year-olds to workers 55 to 64 years of age in the United States for the time period 1994 to 2019. The highest fatality rates are seen at the ends of this spectrum, with the highest rates for workers 55 to 64 years of age, 5.2 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents, followed by the rate for 15 year olds, 4.6 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents. Rates generally increase from younger to older age groups for the mediate age groups with rates increasing from a low of 2.6 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents for 16 to 17 year-olds to a rate of 4.0 deaths per 100,000 fulltime equivalents for workers 45-54 years of age. (Source: Fatal injury totals and rates were generated by NIOSH researchers with restricted access to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) microdata and BLS Current Population Survey data; additional information at BLS: Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) – Currentexternal icon and BLS: Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Surveyexternal icon. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of BLS.)
Page last reviewed: September 20, 2021