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TRAUMATIC OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES

Data and Statistics

collage of images - logger, wrecked truck, farm tractor

Identifying problems in traumatic injury research, as in much of public health, is driven by surveillance. Surveillance is "the ongoing collection, analysis and interpretation of health data in the process of describing and monitoring a health [injury] event."* For occupational safety research, this refers to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on injuries, hazards, and exposures for identifying potential risk factors for further research, and for prevention planning and intervention evaluation. (From Traumatic Occupational Injury Research Needs and Priorities: A Report by the NORA Traumatic Injury Team, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 98-134.)

* Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [1988] Guidelines for Evaluating Surveillance Systems. MMWR 37 (S-5):1-18. May 6, 1988.

Fatal Injury Data

The NIOSH Worker Health Chartbook, 2004 Fatal Injury Charts

NIOSH National Traumatic Occupational Fatality (NTOF) Surveillance System
NTOF provides a nationwide surveillance system for occupational injury deaths. NTOF is based on death certificates as a sole source of case identification and has been estimated to include an average of 81 percent of all occupational injury deaths nationwide. NTOF data are currently available for the years 1980 through 1995. NTOF is the most comprehensive source of data on occupational injury fatalities prior to 1992.

Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) Injuries, Illnesses and Fatalities Web site

BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)
--a national census of occupational injury fatalities, including self-employed workers, agricultural workers, and government employees. CFOI, developed and maintained by BLS, uses multiple sources of information, e.g. death certificates, OSHA reports, workers' compensation data, police reports, and newspaper clippings. CFOI is a Federal/State cooperative program in which costs are shared. States provide data to BLS for inclusion in a national database and maintain their own State databases.

Nonfatal Injury Data

CAIS: The Childhood Agricultural Injury Survey (CAIS)
CAIS data tables provide results from multiple years of CAIS. These tables provide national estimates of demographics and nonfatal injuries for youth less than 20 years of age on US farms and ranches.

M-CAIS: The Minority Farm Operator Childhood Agricultural Injury Survey (M-CAIS)
M-CAIS data tables provide results from multiple years of M-CAIS. These tables provide national estimates of demographics and nonfatal injuries for youth less than 20 years of age on minority-operated farms and ranches in the US.

OISPA:  The Occupational Injury Surveillance of Production Agriculture (OISPA)
OISPA data tables provide results from multiple years of OISPA. These tables provide national and regional estimates of demographics and nonfatal occupational injuries for adults 20 years of age and older on US farms and ranches.

M-OISPA: Minority Farm Operator Occupational Injury Surveillance of Production Agriculture Survey (M-OISPA)
The M-OISPA data tables providing results from two surveys are divided into two broad categories, demographics and injury. The data are further broken out by racial minority and Hispanic operated farms. Because it is possible for an operator to report being of Hispanic origin and a racial minority on the Census of Agriculture, the Hispanic and racial minority estimates are not mutually exclusive and cannot be combined to produce an overall estimate for minority farm operations.

Work-RISQS: Work-Related Injury Statistics Query System
Work-RISQS is an interactive system for obtaining national estimates (number of cases) and rates (number of cases per hours worked) for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments.

NIOSH collaborates with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to capture nonfatal work-related injuries and illnesses treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments by using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). The NEISS—Occupational Supplement (NEISS-Work) is the source of the data made available through Work-RISQS.

The NIOSH Worker Health Chartbook, 2004Nonfatal Injury Charts

BLS Annual Survey Data

Other Links:

Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS)

Tracking Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Hazards: The NIOSH Surveillance Strategic Plan

 
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