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Global Health Security Action Packages to prevent, rapidly detect, and effectively respond to infectious disease threats:

  • Countries Committing to Implementation of All Action Packages

     

  • Prevent, Detect, Respond: Commitments Across the Globe

     

  • Prevent 1: Combat antimicrobial resistance.

     

  • Prevent 2: Minimize spillover of zoonotic diseases from animals to humans.

     

  • Prevent 3: Create and strengthen national biosafety and biosecurity systems.

     

  • Prevent 4: Create and strengthen national vaccine delivery systems.

     

  • Detect 1: Establish real-time biosurveillance with laboratory systems and effective point-of care/laboratory-based diagnostics.

     

  • Detect 2: Strengthen surveillance systems to rapidly detect public health, animal health, and health security threats.

     

  • Detect 3: Strengthen surveillance systems to rapidly detect public health, animal health, and health security threats.

     

  • Detect 4: Strengthen ability of countries to accurately and rapidly report infectious disease in line with international requirements and guidelines.

     

  • Detect 5: Establish fully component, coordinate, and multi-disciplinary national workforce to identify and respond to infectious disease threats.

     

  • Respond 1: Establish and strengthen national emergency operations centers.

     

  • Respond 2: Strengthen nations' abilities to conduct rapid, multi-sectoral response to infectious disease threats.

     

  • Respond 3: Establish national frameworks for transferring medical countermeasures and health personnel among international partners during emergencies.

     

Global Health Security Agenda Milestones

Helsinki, Finland Meeting - May 5-6, 2014

What Global Health Security Is

The importance of global health security has never been clearer. New microbes are emerging and spreading, drug resistance is rising, and laboratories around the world could intentionally or unintentionally release dangerous microbes. Globalization of travel and trade increase the chance and speed of these risks spreading. To address these challenges, CDC is joining with other U.S. government agencies and global partners to advance a Global Health Security Agenda. The aim of this agenda is to accelerate progress toward a safe world and to promote global health security as an international priority.

CDC's role in global health security is rooted in science and based on three concepts long embedded in the agency's mission to protect public health worldwide:

Prevent        Detect        Respond

Why It Matters

Disease Threats Can Spread Faster and More Unpredictably Than Ever Before

People are traveling more. Food and medical product supply chains stretch across the globe. Biological threats (such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV) anddrug-resistant illnesses pose a growing danger to people everywhere, whether diseases are naturally occurring, intentionally produced, or the result of a laboratory accident. In today's interconnected world, poorly treated cases of TB or pneumonia in Asia and Africa have shown up in U.S. hospitals within days.


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U.S. Agenda

In partnership with U.S. government sister agencies, other nations, international organizations, and public and private stakeholders, CDC seeks to accelerate progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and to promote global health security as an international security priority, to

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What CDC Is Doing

CDC has been a leader in improving global health security (GHS) for many decades and plays an important role in the GHS agenda. CDC's strategy is rooted in science and based on three concepts long embedded in the agency's mission to protect public health worldwide:

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  • Page last reviewed: September 26, 2014
  • Page last updated: September 26, 2014
  • Content source: Global Health
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