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	Countries Where CDC Works

  
	child with nurse for global HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

CDC leverages its core strengths to advance four overarching global health goals:
1) improving the health and well-being of people around the world,
2) improving capabilities for preparing for and responding to infectious diseases and emerging health threats,
3) building country public health capacity, and
4) maximizing organizational capacity.
 

To learn more about these goals and our vision, see our global strategy(http://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/strategy/default.htm).

 

The most effective and least expensive way to protect Americans from diseases and other health threats that begin overseas is to stop them before they spread to our shores. CDC works 24/7 to protect the American people from disease both in the U.S. and overseas. CDC detects and controls outbreaks at their source, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. In addition, fighting diseases like HIV/AIDS, malaria, and TB help reduce poverty and strengthen political stability in developing countries.

	CDC Roybal Campus Atlanta, GA

For more than 60 years, CDC has used its scientific expertise to help people throughout the world live healthier, safer, longer lives. CDC's Center for Global Health coordinates and manages the agency's resources and expertise to address global challenges such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, emergency and refugee health, non-communicable diseases, injuries, and more.

Making a Difference

Blog

	Blog of the week
Think NoHep this World Hepatitis Day

CDC’s vision is to eliminate viral hepatitis in the United States and worldwide. World Hepatitis Day - July 28, 2016 - is an opportunity to highlight the global burden of disease and our efforts to combat viral hepatitis around the world...
Posted July 25, 2016

Video

Make the elimination of viral hepatitis our next greatest achievement

On 28 May, 194 Member States made a historic commitment to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. At the 69th World Health Assembly, governments unanimously voted to adopt the first ever Global Viral Hepatitis Strategy, signalling the greatest global commitment in viral hepatitis to date.

Story

	Story of the week
Country of Georgia: Putting Data to Work

To stop a disease in its tracks, you need to get ahead of it. But if the disease you’re tracking doesn’t respect boundaries, then neither can you. This may mean going off the beaten path into remote villages where your GPS doesn’t work...

Infographic

CDC Zika Updates

	Zika Outbreak World Map

Latest Outbreak Info

On January 22, 2016, CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to respond to outbreaks of Zika occurring in the Americas and increased reports of birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome in areas affected by Zika. On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) because of clusters of microcephaly and other neurological disorders in some areas affected by Zika. On February 8, 2016, CDC elevated its EOC activation to a Level 1, the highest level.

CDC is working with international public health partners and with state and local health departments to

  • Alert healthcare providers and the public about Zika.
  • Post travel notices and other travel-related guidance.
  • Provide state health laboratories with diagnostic tests.
  • Detect and report cases, which will help prevent further spread.
  • Page last reviewed: July 25, 2016
  • Page last updated: July 25, 2016
  • Content source: Global Health
    Notice: Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS, CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.
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