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FETP - Partners

Partnerships

FELTP resident Dr. Abid Saeed, accompanied by two police officers for security, examines children in rural Taluka Salehpat, district Sukkur, Pakistan, January 2013.

FELTP resident Dr. Abid Saeed, accompanied by two police officers for security, examines children in rural Taluka Salehpat, district Sukkur, Pakistan, January 2013.

Our work is only possible through partnerships. Developing partnerships is an important element of establishing, supporting, and sustaining our programs. Ministries of health are our main partners in building workforce and systems capacity. Other collaborations and partnerships include other CDC units, especially CDC’s Division of Global HIV/AIDS and the Global Disease Detection Program.

Externally, we have built strong partnerships with many national and international organizations such as the World Health Organization, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the government of the United Kingdom, Ellison Medical Foundation, the Carter Center, and the World Bank.

FETP Networks

Many of the countries that host or send residents to a neighboring country’s FETP collaborate with the Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network (TEPHINET), a global network of Field Epidemiology Training Programs, to share resources and best practices. Regional FETP networks also exist, including:

Resident Advisors

An FETP resident gives a child a Vitamin A supplement in response to detecting malnutrition as a risk factor for measles in the Monduli District, Tanzania, August 2011. Photo by Remidius Kakulu.

An FETP resident gives a child a Vitamin A supplement in response to detecting malnutrition as a risk factor for measles in the Monduli District, Tanzania, August 2011. Photo by Remidius Kakulu.

Partner countries develop FETPs to address their severe shortage of skilled epidemiologists in country. In most cases, the country also lacks a sufficient number of experts in country who can serve as mentors to the residents during the first few years of the program. In such situations, CDC will place an expert field epidemiologist and trainer to serve as the “Resident Advisor” until a sufficient number of FETP residents have graduated who are able to serve as mentors and trainers to incoming residents. The Resident Advisor is usually a graduate of EIS or another FETP and his or her role is to facilitate the development and implementation of the curriculum; ensure the scientific excellence of the training; supervise the

Support from CDC Headquarters

At CDC headquarters in Atlanta, a team of medical officers, epidemiologists and health scientists, public health advisors, and instructional designers provide scientific expertise, training consultations, and other programmatic support and ad vice to help ministries of health implement their FETP. For example, CDC develops customized classroom curricula for epidemiology, biostatistics, management, and public health communication skills to be used by the FETPs in country. CDC also conducts health system assessments in order to target training content, as well as the placement of residents in the field, to best meet the needs of the country or region.

 
  • Page last reviewed: March 13, 2014
  • Page last updated: March 13, 2014
  • Content source: Global Health
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